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Auditory evoked responses to a frequency glide following a static pure tone

In this study, we look at the auditory evoked response to a frequency glide following a static pure tone. A frequency glide is a frequency ramp with specific frequency change range (Δf) and duration (Δt). Frequency change rate (Δf/ Δt) and direction (increasing or decreasing frequency) of a glide ar... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America May 2013, Vol.133(5), pp.3429-3429
Main Author: Wang, Wen-Jie
Other Authors: Tan, Chin-Tuan , Martin, Brett A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: © 2013 Acoustical Society of America (AIP)
ID: ISSN: 0001-4966 ; DOI: 10.1121/1.4806040
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4806040
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recordid: aip_complete10.1121/1.4806040
title: Auditory evoked responses to a frequency glide following a static pure tone
format: Article
creator:
  • Wang, Wen-Jie
  • Tan, Chin-Tuan
  • Martin, Brett A.
subjects:
  • Ica 2013 Montréal
ispartof: The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, May 2013, Vol.133(5), pp.3429-3429
description: In this study, we look at the auditory evoked response to a frequency glide following a static pure tone. A frequency glide is a frequency ramp with specific frequency change range (Δf) and duration (Δt). Frequency change rate (Δf/ Δt) and direction (increasing or decreasing frequency) of a glide are important cues for speech perception. P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex (ACC) responses to increasing or decreasing frequency glides were observed in the recordings of normal hearing subjects. Subjects were also asked to behaviorally discriminate similar stimuli with a fixed Δt at 50 ms or 200 ms and a varying Δt in a separate experiment. Similar findings were obtained with glides at both 500 and 1 kHz base frequency. In these preliminary data, we observed larger N1-P2 responses with the glides of fixed Δt 50 ms at both 500 Hz and 1000 Hz base frequency. However, larger N1-P2 responses for increasing glides than for decreasing glides were only observed with glides at 500 Hz base frequency. Larger N1-P2 response at shorter Δt seems to tally with the smaller behavioral threshold of Δt difference between stimulus with a fixed Δt at 50 ms and stimulus with varying Δt.
language: eng
source: © 2013 Acoustical Society of America (AIP)
identifier: ISSN: 0001-4966 ; DOI: 10.1121/1.4806040
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0001-4966
  • 00014966
url: Link


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titleAuditory evoked responses to a frequency glide following a static pure tone
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descriptionIn this study, we look at the auditory evoked response to a frequency glide following a static pure tone. A frequency glide is a frequency ramp with specific frequency change range (Δf) and duration (Δt). Frequency change rate (Δf/ Δt) and direction (increasing or decreasing frequency) of a glide are important cues for speech perception. P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex (ACC) responses to increasing or decreasing frequency glides were observed in the recordings of normal hearing subjects. Subjects were also asked to behaviorally discriminate similar stimuli with a fixed Δt at 50 ms or 200 ms and a varying Δt in a separate experiment. Similar findings were obtained with glides at both 500 and 1 kHz base frequency. In these preliminary data, we observed larger N1-P2 responses with the glides of fixed Δt 50 ms at both 500 Hz and 1000 Hz base frequency. However, larger N1-P2 responses for increasing glides than for decreasing glides were only observed with glides at 500 Hz base frequency. Larger N1-P2 response at shorter Δt seems to tally with the smaller behavioral threshold of Δt difference between stimulus with a fixed Δt at 50 ms and stimulus with varying Δt.
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descriptionIn this study, we look at the auditory evoked response to a frequency glide following a static pure tone. A frequency glide is a frequency ramp with specific frequency change range (Δf) and duration (Δt). Frequency change rate (Δf/ Δt) and direction (increasing or decreasing frequency) of a glide are important cues for speech perception. P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex (ACC) responses to increasing or decreasing frequency glides were observed in the recordings of normal hearing subjects. Subjects were also asked to behaviorally discriminate similar stimuli with a fixed Δt at 50 ms or 200 ms and a varying Δt in a separate experiment. Similar findings were obtained with glides at both 500 and 1 kHz base frequency. In these preliminary data, we observed larger N1-P2 responses with the glides of fixed Δt 50 ms at both 500 Hz and 1000 Hz base frequency. However, larger N1-P2 responses for increasing glides than for decreasing glides were only observed with glides at 500 Hz base frequency. Larger N1-P2 response at shorter Δt seems to tally with the smaller behavioral threshold of Δt difference between stimulus with a fixed Δt at 50 ms and stimulus with varying Δt.
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abstractIn this study, we look at the auditory evoked response to a frequency glide following a static pure tone. A frequency glide is a frequency ramp with specific frequency change range (Δf) and duration (Δt). Frequency change rate (Δf/ Δt) and direction (increasing or decreasing frequency) of a glide are important cues for speech perception. P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex (ACC) responses to increasing or decreasing frequency glides were observed in the recordings of normal hearing subjects. Subjects were also asked to behaviorally discriminate similar stimuli with a fixed Δt at 50 ms or 200 ms and a varying Δt in a separate experiment. Similar findings were obtained with glides at both 500 and 1 kHz base frequency. In these preliminary data, we observed larger N1-P2 responses with the glides of fixed Δt 50 ms at both 500 Hz and 1000 Hz base frequency. However, larger N1-P2 responses for increasing glides than for decreasing glides were only observed with glides at 500 Hz base frequency. Larger N1-P2 response at shorter Δt seems to tally with the smaller behavioral threshold of Δt difference between stimulus with a fixed Δt at 50 ms and stimulus with varying Δt.
pubAcoustical Society of America
doi10.1121/1.4806040
date2013-05