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Photoacoustic imaging for ultrasound tissue characterization and treatment monitoring

Photoacoustic imaging relies on generation of ultrasound waves from optically absorbing structures. The ultrasound produced in photoacoustic imaging can be analyzed by methods developed to analyze ultrasound backscatter signals for ultrasound tissue characterization, but the interpretation of the an... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America October 2016, Vol.140(4), pp.2951-2951
Main Author: Kolios, Michael C.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: © 2016 Acoustical Society of America (AIP)
ID: ISSN: 0001-4966 ; DOI: 10.1121/1.4969111
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4969111
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recordid: aip_complete10.1121/1.4969111
title: Photoacoustic imaging for ultrasound tissue characterization and treatment monitoring
format: Article
creator:
  • Kolios, Michael C.
subjects:
  • 5th Joint Meeting Of The Acoustical Society Of America And The Acoustical Society Of Japan
ispartof: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, October 2016, Vol.140(4), pp.2951-2951
description: Photoacoustic imaging relies on generation of ultrasound waves from optically absorbing structures. The ultrasound produced in photoacoustic imaging can be analyzed by methods developed to analyze ultrasound backscatter signals for ultrasound tissue characterization, but the interpretation of the analysis is based on the physics of photoacoustic wave generation. In the absence of exogenous absorbers, blood is one of the dominant optically absorbing tissues. Hemoglobin in red blood cells is the main endogenous chromophore in blood. The spatial distribution of red blood cells in tissue determines the spectral characteristics of the ultrasound signals produced. We are interested in cancer treatment monitoring. Tumor blood vessels have distinct organizational structure compared to normal blood vessels: normal vessel networks are hierarchically organized, with vessels that are evenly distributed to ensure adequate oxygen and nutrient delivery. Tumor vessels are structurally different: they are torturous and hyperpermeable. Therapies that target the vasculature can induce changes in the vascular networks that in principle should be detected using photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we will show how the frequency content of the photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels that can be used to assess treatment response.
language: eng
source: © 2016 Acoustical Society of America (AIP)
identifier: ISSN: 0001-4966 ; DOI: 10.1121/1.4969111
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0001-4966
  • 00014966
url: Link


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descriptionPhotoacoustic imaging relies on generation of ultrasound waves from optically absorbing structures. The ultrasound produced in photoacoustic imaging can be analyzed by methods developed to analyze ultrasound backscatter signals for ultrasound tissue characterization, but the interpretation of the analysis is based on the physics of photoacoustic wave generation. In the absence of exogenous absorbers, blood is one of the dominant optically absorbing tissues. Hemoglobin in red blood cells is the main endogenous chromophore in blood. The spatial distribution of red blood cells in tissue determines the spectral characteristics of the ultrasound signals produced. We are interested in cancer treatment monitoring. Tumor blood vessels have distinct organizational structure compared to normal blood vessels: normal vessel networks are hierarchically organized, with vessels that are evenly distributed to ensure adequate oxygen and nutrient delivery. Tumor vessels are structurally different: they are torturous and hyperpermeable. Therapies that target the vasculature can induce changes in the vascular networks that in principle should be detected using photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we will show how the frequency content of the photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels that can be used to assess treatment response.
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descriptionPhotoacoustic imaging relies on generation of ultrasound waves from optically absorbing structures. The ultrasound produced in photoacoustic imaging can be analyzed by methods developed to analyze ultrasound backscatter signals for ultrasound tissue characterization, but the interpretation of the analysis is based on the physics of photoacoustic wave generation. In the absence of exogenous absorbers, blood is one of the dominant optically absorbing tissues. Hemoglobin in red blood cells is the main endogenous chromophore in blood. The spatial distribution of red blood cells in tissue determines the spectral characteristics of the ultrasound signals produced. We are interested in cancer treatment monitoring. Tumor blood vessels have distinct organizational structure compared to normal blood vessels: normal vessel networks are hierarchically organized, with vessels that are evenly distributed to ensure adequate oxygen and nutrient delivery. Tumor vessels are structurally different: they are torturous and hyperpermeable. Therapies that target the vasculature can induce changes in the vascular networks that in principle should be detected using photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we will show how the frequency content of the photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels that can be used to assess treatment response.
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abstractPhotoacoustic imaging relies on generation of ultrasound waves from optically absorbing structures. The ultrasound produced in photoacoustic imaging can be analyzed by methods developed to analyze ultrasound backscatter signals for ultrasound tissue characterization, but the interpretation of the analysis is based on the physics of photoacoustic wave generation. In the absence of exogenous absorbers, blood is one of the dominant optically absorbing tissues. Hemoglobin in red blood cells is the main endogenous chromophore in blood. The spatial distribution of red blood cells in tissue determines the spectral characteristics of the ultrasound signals produced. We are interested in cancer treatment monitoring. Tumor blood vessels have distinct organizational structure compared to normal blood vessels: normal vessel networks are hierarchically organized, with vessels that are evenly distributed to ensure adequate oxygen and nutrient delivery. Tumor vessels are structurally different: they are torturous and hyperpermeable. Therapies that target the vasculature can induce changes in the vascular networks that in principle should be detected using photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we will show how the frequency content of the photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels that can be used to assess treatment response.
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