schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Divergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation

Despite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omnisci... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2012, Vol.102(1), pp.4-21
Main Author: Laurin, Kristin
Other Authors: Kay, Aaron C. , Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
God
ID: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0025971
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025971
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0025971
title: Divergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation
format: Article
creator:
  • Laurin, Kristin
  • Kay, Aaron C.
  • Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
subjects:
  • God
  • Religion
  • Self-Regulation
  • Self-Control
  • Goal Pursuit
ispartof: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2012, Vol.102(1), pp.4-21
description: Despite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omniscient, all-knowing being. Given these 2 characteristic features, how might exposure to the concept of God influence behavior? Leveraging classic and recent theorizing on self-regulation and social cognition, we predict and test for 2 divergent effects of exposure to notions of God on self-regulatory processes. Specifically, we show that participants reminded of God (vs. neutral or positive concepts) demonstrate both decreased active goal pursuit (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and increased temptation resistance (Studies 3, 4, and 5). These findings provide the first experimental evidence that exposure to God influences goal pursuit and suggest that the ever-present cultural reminders of God can be both burden and benefit for self-regulation.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0025971
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-3514
  • 00223514
  • 1939-1315
  • 19391315
url: Link


@attributes
ID310043887
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1037/a0025971
sourceidapa_articles
recordidTN_apa_articles10.1037/a0025971
sourcesystemOther
pqid1010969624
galeid276135036
display
typearticle
titleDivergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation
creatorLaurin, Kristin ; Kay, Aaron C. ; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2012, Vol.102(1), pp.4-21
identifier
subjectGod ; Religion ; Self-Regulation ; Self-Control ; Goal Pursuit
descriptionDespite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omniscient, all-knowing being. Given these 2 characteristic features, how might exposure to the concept of God influence behavior? Leveraging classic and recent theorizing on self-regulation and social cognition, we predict and test for 2 divergent effects of exposure to notions of God on self-regulatory processes. Specifically, we show that participants reminded of God (vs. neutral or positive concepts) demonstrate both decreased active goal pursuit (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and increased temptation resistance (Studies 3, 4, and 5). These findings provide the first experimental evidence that exposure to God influences goal pursuit and suggest that the ever-present cultural reminders of God can be both burden and benefit for self-regulation.
languageeng
source
version12
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025971$$EView_this_record_in_PsycARTICLES
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Laurin, Kristin
1Kay, Aaron C.
2Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
titleDivergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation
descriptionDespite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omniscient, all-knowing being. Given these 2 characteristic features, how might exposure to the concept of God influence behavior? Leveraging classic and recent theorizing on self-regulation and social cognition, we predict and test for 2 divergent effects of exposure to notions of God on self-regulatory processes. Specifically, we show that participants reminded of God (vs. neutral or positive concepts) demonstrate both decreased active goal pursuit (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and increased temptation resistance (Studies 3, 4, and 5). These findings provide the first experimental evidence that exposure to God influences goal pursuit and suggest that the ever-present cultural reminders of God can be both burden and benefit for self-regulation.
subject
0God
1Religion
2Self-Regulation
3Self-Control
4Goal Pursuit
general
0English
110.1037/a0025971
2PsycARTICLES (American Psychological Association)
sourceidapa_articles
recordidapa_articles10.1037/a0025971
issn
00022-3514
100223514
21939-1315
319391315
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
addtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
searchscopeapa_articles
scopeapa_articles
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages, galeid, date]
sort
titleDivergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation
authorLaurin, Kristin ; Kay, Aaron C. ; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
creationdate20120100
facets
frbrgroupid8955123902039208751
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2012
topic
0God
1Religion
2Self-Regulation
3Self-Control
4Goal Pursuit
collectionPsycARTICLES (American Psychological Association)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Laurin, Kristin
1Kay, Aaron C.
2Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
jtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Laurin
1Kay
2Fitzsimons
aufirst
0Kristin
1Aaron C.
2Gráinne M.
au
0Laurin, Kristin
1Kay, Aaron C.
2Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.
atitleDivergent Effects of Activating Thoughts of God on Self-Regulation
jtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
risdate201201
volume102
issue1
spage4
epage21
pages4-21
issn0022-3514
eissn1939-1315
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractDespite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omniscient, all-knowing being. Given these 2 characteristic features, how might exposure to the concept of God influence behavior? Leveraging classic and recent theorizing on self-regulation and social cognition, we predict and test for 2 divergent effects of exposure to notions of God on self-regulatory processes. Specifically, we show that participants reminded of God (vs. neutral or positive concepts) demonstrate both decreased active goal pursuit (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and increased temptation resistance (Studies 3, 4, and 5). These findings provide the first experimental evidence that exposure to God influences goal pursuit and suggest that the ever-present cultural reminders of God can be both burden and benefit for self-regulation.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0025971
date2012-01-01