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Reflections on Religious Belief and Prosociality: Comment on Galen (2012)

Luke Galen (2012) offers a timely analysis of associations between religiosity and prosocial and antisocial attitudes and behaviors. After identifying 10 points of agreement, I raise 8 questions for further reflection and research: (1) Is ingroup giving and volunteerism not prosocial? (2) Are religi... Full description

Journal Title: Psychological Bulletin 2012, Vol.138(5), pp.913-917
Main Author: Myers, David G.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0033-2909 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1455 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0029009
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029009
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0029009
title: Reflections on Religious Belief and Prosociality: Comment on Galen (2012)
format: Article
creator:
  • Myers, David G.
subjects:
  • Religiosity
  • Religion
  • Altruism
  • Prosocial
ispartof: Psychological Bulletin, 2012, Vol.138(5), pp.913-917
description: Luke Galen (2012) offers a timely analysis of associations between religiosity and prosocial and antisocial attitudes and behaviors. After identifying 10 points of agreement, I raise 8 questions for further reflection and research: (1) Is ingroup giving and volunteerism not prosocial? (2) Are religion-related prosocial norms part of the religious factor? (3) Is social support also appropriately considered part of the religious factor? (4) Are self-report data from more and less religious people invalid? (5) How should we disentangle gender and religiosity? (6) How might we resolve “the religious engagement paradox”? (7) Does religion serve an adaptive, evolutionary function? And (8) Might research further explore religiosity, in its varieties, and prosociality?
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0033-2909 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1455 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0029009
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0033-2909
  • 00332909
  • 1939-1455
  • 19391455
url: Link


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descriptionLuke Galen (2012) offers a timely analysis of associations between religiosity and prosocial and antisocial attitudes and behaviors. After identifying 10 points of agreement, I raise 8 questions for further reflection and research: (1) Is ingroup giving and volunteerism not prosocial? (2) Are religion-related prosocial norms part of the religious factor? (3) Is social support also appropriately considered part of the religious factor? (4) Are self-report data from more and less religious people invalid? (5) How should we disentangle gender and religiosity? (6) How might we resolve “the religious engagement paradox”? (7) Does religion serve an adaptive, evolutionary function? And (8) Might research further explore religiosity, in its varieties, and prosociality?
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abstractLuke Galen (2012) offers a timely analysis of associations between religiosity and prosocial and antisocial attitudes and behaviors. After identifying 10 points of agreement, I raise 8 questions for further reflection and research: (1) Is ingroup giving and volunteerism not prosocial? (2) Are religion-related prosocial norms part of the religious factor? (3) Is social support also appropriately considered part of the religious factor? (4) Are self-report data from more and less religious people invalid? (5) How should we disentangle gender and religiosity? (6) How might we resolve “the religious engagement paradox”? (7) Does religion serve an adaptive, evolutionary function? And (8) Might research further explore religiosity, in its varieties, and prosociality?
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