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Experimental Findings on God as an Attachment Figure: Normative Processes and Moderating Effects of Internal Working Models

Four studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2–4 were subliminal... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2012, Vol.103(5), pp.804-818
Main Author: Granqvist, Pehr
Other Authors: Mikulincer, Mario , Gewirtz, Vered , Shaver, Phillip R.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
God
ID: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0029344
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029344
Zum Text:
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0029344
title: Experimental Findings on God as an Attachment Figure: Normative Processes and Moderating Effects of Internal Working Models
format: Article
creator:
  • Granqvist, Pehr
  • Mikulincer, Mario
  • Gewirtz, Vered
  • Shaver, Phillip R.
subjects:
  • Religion
  • God
  • Attachment
  • Internal Working Models
  • Implicit Processes
ispartof: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2012, Vol.103(5), pp.804-818
description: Four studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2–4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with “God” heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0029344
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-3514
  • 00223514
  • 1939-1315
  • 19391315
url: Link


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descriptionFour studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2–4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with “God” heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.
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descriptionFour studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2–4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with “God” heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.
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abstractFour studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2–4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with “God” heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0029344
date2012-11