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The Impact of Religious Faith and Internalized Homonegativity on Resiliency for Black Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Emerging Adults

Religious faith has been instrumental in fostering positive mental health outcomes for historically disenfranchised populations, such as Black Americans. However, the religious institutional devaluing of same-sex behavior and identity fuels internalized homonegativity (i.e., negative thoughts regard... Full description

Journal Title: Developmental Psychology 2013, Vol.49(9), pp.1723-1731
Main Author: Walker, Ja’nina J.
Other Authors: Longmire-Avital, Buffie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0031059
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031059
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0031059
title: The Impact of Religious Faith and Internalized Homonegativity on Resiliency for Black Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Emerging Adults
format: Article
creator:
  • Walker, Ja’nina J.
  • Longmire-Avital, Buffie
subjects:
  • Black
  • Lesbian–Gay–Bisexual (Lgb)
  • Religion
  • Resilience
  • Internalized Homonegativity
ispartof: Developmental Psychology, 2013, Vol.49(9), pp.1723-1731
description: Religious faith has been instrumental in fostering positive mental health outcomes for historically disenfranchised populations, such as Black Americans. However, the religious institutional devaluing of same-sex behavior and identity fuels internalized homonegativity (i.e., negative thoughts regarding one’s same-sex sexual behavior) for nonheterosexual congregants. This study sought to examine the relations between religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) emerging adults. One hundred seventy-five Black LGB emerging adults, ranging in age between 18 and 25 years old, completed an online survey designed to examine multiple identities and psychological well-being. Utilizing hierarchical linear regression, we found that internalized homonegativity moderated the relationship between religious faith and resiliency. Religious faith was a significant contributor to resiliency when the participant concurrently reported high internalized homonegativity. This finding highlights the importance of understanding the complex interplay of religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black LGB emerging adults.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0031059
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0012-1649
  • 00121649
  • 1939-0599
  • 19390599
url: Link


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descriptionReligious faith has been instrumental in fostering positive mental health outcomes for historically disenfranchised populations, such as Black Americans. However, the religious institutional devaluing of same-sex behavior and identity fuels internalized homonegativity (i.e., negative thoughts regarding one’s same-sex sexual behavior) for nonheterosexual congregants. This study sought to examine the relations between religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) emerging adults. One hundred seventy-five Black LGB emerging adults, ranging in age between 18 and 25 years old, completed an online survey designed to examine multiple identities and psychological well-being. Utilizing hierarchical linear regression, we found that internalized homonegativity moderated the relationship between religious faith and resiliency. Religious faith was a significant contributor to resiliency when the participant concurrently reported high internalized homonegativity. This finding highlights the importance of understanding the complex interplay of religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black LGB emerging adults.
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abstractReligious faith has been instrumental in fostering positive mental health outcomes for historically disenfranchised populations, such as Black Americans. However, the religious institutional devaluing of same-sex behavior and identity fuels internalized homonegativity (i.e., negative thoughts regarding one’s same-sex sexual behavior) for nonheterosexual congregants. This study sought to examine the relations between religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) emerging adults. One hundred seventy-five Black LGB emerging adults, ranging in age between 18 and 25 years old, completed an online survey designed to examine multiple identities and psychological well-being. Utilizing hierarchical linear regression, we found that internalized homonegativity moderated the relationship between religious faith and resiliency. Religious faith was a significant contributor to resiliency when the participant concurrently reported high internalized homonegativity. This finding highlights the importance of understanding the complex interplay of religious faith, internalized homonegativity, and resiliency for Black LGB emerging adults.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0031059
date2013-09