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Strategy Repetition in Young and Older Adults: A Study in Arithmetic

We investigated a new phenomenon that sheds light on age-related differences in strategy selection: the strategy repetition phenomenon (i.e., tendency to repeat the same strategy over consecutive items). Young and older adults had to provide the best estimates of multiplication problems like 47 × 86... Full description

Journal Title: Developmental Psychology 2014, Vol.50(2), pp.460-468
Main Author: Lemaire, Patrick
Other Authors: Leclère, Mariel
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0033527
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033527
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0033527
title: Strategy Repetition in Young and Older Adults: A Study in Arithmetic
format: Article
creator:
  • Lemaire, Patrick
  • Leclère, Mariel
subjects:
  • Aging
  • Strategic Development
  • Strategy Selection
  • Strategy Repetition
  • Arithmetic
ispartof: Developmental Psychology, 2014, Vol.50(2), pp.460-468
description: We investigated a new phenomenon that sheds light on age-related differences in strategy selection: the strategy repetition phenomenon (i.e., tendency to repeat the same strategy over consecutive items). Young and older adults had to provide the best estimates of multiplication problems like 47 × 86. They had to select the best of 2 rounding strategies on each problem, the rounding-down strategy (i.e., doing 40 × 80 = 3,200) or the rounding-up strategy (i.e., doing 50 × 90 = 4,500). Data showed that both young and older adults repeated the same strategy over consecutive problems more often than chance and repeated strategies more often in the 2-prime condition (i.e., after executing one strategy to solve the 2 immediately preceding problems) than in the 1-prime condition (i.e., after executing a strategy on one immediately preceding problem). Moreover, this strategy repetition phenomenon increased with age, especially in the most difficult condition (e.g., when participants solved rounding-up problems in the 2-prime condition). Our findings have important theoretical and empirical implications for computational models of strategy selection and for furthering our understanding of strategic development during adulthood.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0033527
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0012-1649
  • 00121649
  • 1939-0599
  • 19390599
url: Link


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descriptionWe investigated a new phenomenon that sheds light on age-related differences in strategy selection: the strategy repetition phenomenon (i.e., tendency to repeat the same strategy over consecutive items). Young and older adults had to provide the best estimates of multiplication problems like 47 × 86. They had to select the best of 2 rounding strategies on each problem, the rounding-down strategy (i.e., doing 40 × 80 = 3,200) or the rounding-up strategy (i.e., doing 50 × 90 = 4,500). Data showed that both young and older adults repeated the same strategy over consecutive problems more often than chance and repeated strategies more often in the 2-prime condition (i.e., after executing one strategy to solve the 2 immediately preceding problems) than in the 1-prime condition (i.e., after executing a strategy on one immediately preceding problem). Moreover, this strategy repetition phenomenon increased with age, especially in the most difficult condition (e.g., when participants solved rounding-up problems in the 2-prime condition). Our findings have important theoretical and empirical implications for computational models of strategy selection and for furthering our understanding of strategic development during adulthood.
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abstractWe investigated a new phenomenon that sheds light on age-related differences in strategy selection: the strategy repetition phenomenon (i.e., tendency to repeat the same strategy over consecutive items). Young and older adults had to provide the best estimates of multiplication problems like 47 × 86. They had to select the best of 2 rounding strategies on each problem, the rounding-down strategy (i.e., doing 40 × 80 = 3,200) or the rounding-up strategy (i.e., doing 50 × 90 = 4,500). Data showed that both young and older adults repeated the same strategy over consecutive problems more often than chance and repeated strategies more often in the 2-prime condition (i.e., after executing one strategy to solve the 2 immediately preceding problems) than in the 1-prime condition (i.e., after executing a strategy on one immediately preceding problem). Moreover, this strategy repetition phenomenon increased with age, especially in the most difficult condition (e.g., when participants solved rounding-up problems in the 2-prime condition). Our findings have important theoretical and empirical implications for computational models of strategy selection and for furthering our understanding of strategic development during adulthood.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0033527
date2014-02