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Religious Magnanimity: Reminding People of Their Religious Belief System Reduces Hostility After Threat

The present research tested the hypothesis that many people’s ambient religious beliefs are non-hostile and magnanimous by assessing whether reminding people of their religious belief systems would reduce hostility after threat. Across religious affiliations, participants reported that their religio... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2014, Vol.107(3), pp.432-453
Main Author: Schumann, Karina
Other Authors: Mcgregor, Ian , Nash, Kyle A. , Ross, Michael
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0036739
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036739
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0036739
title: Religious Magnanimity: Reminding People of Their Religious Belief System Reduces Hostility After Threat
format: Article
creator:
  • Schumann, Karina
  • Mcgregor, Ian
  • Nash, Kyle A.
  • Ross, Michael
subjects:
  • Religion
  • Threat
  • Hostility
  • Ideals
  • Promotion Focus
ispartof: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2014, Vol.107(3), pp.432-453
description: The present research tested the hypothesis that many people’s ambient religious beliefs are non-hostile and magnanimous by assessing whether reminding people of their religious belief systems would reduce hostility after threat. Across religious affiliations, participants reported that their religious belief systems encourage magnanimous behavior. In addition, priming their religious belief systems caused them to act more magnanimously, but only when motivated to adhere to salient ideals (i.e., after threats; see Gailliot, Stillman, Schmeichel, Maner, & Plant, 2008 ; Jonas et al., 2008 ). Specifically, in Studies 1–5, we found that a general religious belief system prime (“Which religious belief system do you identify with?”) reduced the hostility of people’s thoughts, behaviors, and judgments following threat. In Studies 6 and 7, we found that the religious belief system prime only reduced hostile reactions to threat among participants who held religious beliefs that oriented them toward magnanimous ideals (Study 6) and who were dispositionally inclined to adhere to their ideals (Study 7). In Study 8, we found support for the role of magnanimous ideals by demonstrating that directly priming these ideals yielded effects similar to those produced by a religious belief system prime. These studies provide consistent evidence that, by invoking magnanimous ideals, a religious belief system prime promotes less hostile responses to threat.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0036739
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-3514
  • 00223514
  • 1939-1315
  • 19391315
url: Link


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titleReligious Magnanimity: Reminding People of Their Religious Belief System Reduces Hostility After Threat
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ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2014, Vol.107(3), pp.432-453
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subjectReligion ; Threat ; Hostility ; Ideals ; Promotion Focus
descriptionThe present research tested the hypothesis that many people’s ambient religious beliefs are non-hostile and magnanimous by assessing whether reminding people of their religious belief systems would reduce hostility after threat. Across religious affiliations, participants reported that their religious belief systems encourage magnanimous behavior. In addition, priming their religious belief systems caused them to act more magnanimously, but only when motivated to adhere to salient ideals (i.e., after threats; see Gailliot, Stillman, Schmeichel, Maner, & Plant, 2008 ; Jonas et al., 2008 ). Specifically, in Studies 1–5, we found that a general religious belief system prime (“Which religious belief system do you identify with?”) reduced the hostility of people’s thoughts, behaviors, and judgments following threat. In Studies 6 and 7, we found that the religious belief system prime only reduced hostile reactions to threat among participants who held religious beliefs that oriented them toward magnanimous ideals (Study 6) and who were dispositionally inclined to adhere to their ideals (Study 7). In Study 8, we found support for the role of magnanimous ideals by demonstrating that directly priming these ideals yielded effects similar to those produced by a religious belief system prime. These studies provide consistent evidence that, by invoking magnanimous ideals, a religious belief system prime promotes less hostile responses to threat.
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descriptionThe present research tested the hypothesis that many people’s ambient religious beliefs are non-hostile and magnanimous by assessing whether reminding people of their religious belief systems would reduce hostility after threat. Across religious affiliations, participants reported that their religious belief systems encourage magnanimous behavior. In addition, priming their religious belief systems caused them to act more magnanimously, but only when motivated to adhere to salient ideals (i.e., after threats; see Gailliot, Stillman, Schmeichel, Maner, & Plant, 2008 ; Jonas et al., 2008 ). Specifically, in Studies 1–5, we found that a general religious belief system prime (“Which religious belief system do you identify with?”) reduced the hostility of people’s thoughts, behaviors, and judgments following threat. In Studies 6 and 7, we found that the religious belief system prime only reduced hostile reactions to threat among participants who held religious beliefs that oriented them toward magnanimous ideals (Study 6) and who were dispositionally inclined to adhere to their ideals (Study 7). In Study 8, we found support for the role of magnanimous ideals by demonstrating that directly priming these ideals yielded effects similar to those produced by a religious belief system prime. These studies provide consistent evidence that, by invoking magnanimous ideals, a religious belief system prime promotes less hostile responses to threat.
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abstractThe present research tested the hypothesis that many people’s ambient religious beliefs are non-hostile and magnanimous by assessing whether reminding people of their religious belief systems would reduce hostility after threat. Across religious affiliations, participants reported that their religious belief systems encourage magnanimous behavior. In addition, priming their religious belief systems caused them to act more magnanimously, but only when motivated to adhere to salient ideals (i.e., after threats; see Gailliot, Stillman, Schmeichel, Maner, & Plant, 2008 ; Jonas et al., 2008 ). Specifically, in Studies 1–5, we found that a general religious belief system prime (“Which religious belief system do you identify with?”) reduced the hostility of people’s thoughts, behaviors, and judgments following threat. In Studies 6 and 7, we found that the religious belief system prime only reduced hostile reactions to threat among participants who held religious beliefs that oriented them toward magnanimous ideals (Study 6) and who were dispositionally inclined to adhere to their ideals (Study 7). In Study 8, we found support for the role of magnanimous ideals by demonstrating that directly priming these ideals yielded effects similar to those produced by a religious belief system prime. These studies provide consistent evidence that, by invoking magnanimous ideals, a religious belief system prime promotes less hostile responses to threat.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0036739
date2014-09