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Moving Time: The Influence of Action on Duration Perception

Perceiving the sensory consequences of action accurately is essential for appropriate interaction with our physical and social environments. Prediction mechanisms are considered necessary for fine-tuned sensory control of action, yet paradoxically may distort perception. Here, we examine this parado... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 2014, Vol.143(5), pp.1787-1793
Main Author: Press, Clare
Other Authors: Berlot, Eva , Bird, Geoffrey , Ivry, Richard , Cook, Richard
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0096-3445 ; E-ISSN: 1939-2222 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0037650
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037650
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/a0037650
title: Moving Time: The Influence of Action on Duration Perception
format: Article
creator:
  • Press, Clare
  • Berlot, Eva
  • Bird, Geoffrey
  • Ivry, Richard
  • Cook, Richard
subjects:
  • Motor Processes
  • Perceptual Motor Coordination
  • Time Perception
  • Social Perception
ispartof: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2014, Vol.143(5), pp.1787-1793
description: Perceiving the sensory consequences of action accurately is essential for appropriate interaction with our physical and social environments. Prediction mechanisms are considered necessary for fine-tuned sensory control of action, yet paradoxically may distort perception. Here, we examine this paradox by addressing how movement influences the perceived duration of sensory outcomes congruent with action. Experiment 1 required participants to make judgments about the duration of vibrations applied to a moving or stationary finger. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants judged observed finger movements that were congruent or incongruent with their own actions. In all experiments, target events were perceived to be longer when congruent with movement. Interestingly, this temporal dilation did not differ as a function of stimulus perspective (1st or 3rd person) or spatial location. We propose that this bias may reflect the operation of an adaptive mechanism for sensorimotor selection and control that preactivates anticipated outcomes of action. The bias itself may have surprising implications for both action control and perception of others: we may be in contact with grasped objects for less time than we realize, and others’ reactions to us may be briefer than we believe.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0096-3445 ; E-ISSN: 1939-2222 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0037650
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0096-3445
  • 00963445
  • 1939-2222
  • 19392222
url: Link


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descriptionPerceiving the sensory consequences of action accurately is essential for appropriate interaction with our physical and social environments. Prediction mechanisms are considered necessary for fine-tuned sensory control of action, yet paradoxically may distort perception. Here, we examine this paradox by addressing how movement influences the perceived duration of sensory outcomes congruent with action. Experiment 1 required participants to make judgments about the duration of vibrations applied to a moving or stationary finger. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants judged observed finger movements that were congruent or incongruent with their own actions. In all experiments, target events were perceived to be longer when congruent with movement. Interestingly, this temporal dilation did not differ as a function of stimulus perspective (1st or 3rd person) or spatial location. We propose that this bias may reflect the operation of an adaptive mechanism for sensorimotor selection and control that preactivates anticipated outcomes of action. The bias itself may have surprising implications for both action control and perception of others: we may be in contact with grasped objects for less time than we realize, and others’ reactions to us may be briefer than we believe.
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abstractPerceiving the sensory consequences of action accurately is essential for appropriate interaction with our physical and social environments. Prediction mechanisms are considered necessary for fine-tuned sensory control of action, yet paradoxically may distort perception. Here, we examine this paradox by addressing how movement influences the perceived duration of sensory outcomes congruent with action. Experiment 1 required participants to make judgments about the duration of vibrations applied to a moving or stationary finger. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants judged observed finger movements that were congruent or incongruent with their own actions. In all experiments, target events were perceived to be longer when congruent with movement. Interestingly, this temporal dilation did not differ as a function of stimulus perspective (1st or 3rd person) or spatial location. We propose that this bias may reflect the operation of an adaptive mechanism for sensorimotor selection and control that preactivates anticipated outcomes of action. The bias itself may have surprising implications for both action control and perception of others: we may be in contact with grasped objects for less time than we realize, and others’ reactions to us may be briefer than we believe.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/a0037650
date2014-10