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Social Anxiety is Characterized by Biased Learning About Performance and the Self

People learn about their self from social information, and recent work suggests that healthy adults show a positive bias for learning self-related information. In contrast, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by a negative view of the self, yet what causes and maintains this negative self... Full description

Journal Title: Emotion 2017, Vol.17(8), pp.1144-1155
Main Author: Koban, Leonie
Other Authors: Schneider, Rebecca , Ashar, Yoni K. , Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R. , Landy, Lauren , Moscovitch, David A. , Wager, Tor D. , Arch, Joanna J.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1528-3542 ; E-ISSN: 1931-1516 ; DOI: 10.1037/emo0000296
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000296
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/emo0000296
title: Social Anxiety is Characterized by Biased Learning About Performance and the Self
format: Article
creator:
  • Koban, Leonie
  • Schneider, Rebecca
  • Ashar, Yoni K.
  • Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.
  • Landy, Lauren
  • Moscovitch, David A.
  • Wager, Tor D.
  • Arch, Joanna J.
subjects:
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Learning
  • Social Emotions
  • Positivity Bias
  • Feedback Monitoring
ispartof: Emotion, 2017, Vol.17(8), pp.1144-1155
description: People learn about their self from social information, and recent work suggests that healthy adults show a positive bias for learning self-related information. In contrast, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by a negative view of the self, yet what causes and maintains this negative self-view is not well understood. Here the authors use a novel experimental paradigm and computational model to test the hypothesis that biased social learning regarding self-evaluation and self-feelings represents a core feature that distinguishes adults with SAD from healthy controls. Twenty-one adults with SAD and 35 healthy controls (HCs) performed a speech in front of 3 judges. They subsequently evaluated themselves and received performance feedback from the judges and then rated how they felt about themselves and the judges. Affective updating (i.e., change in feelings about the self over time, in response to feedback from the judges) was modeled using an adapted Rescorla-Wagner learning model. HCs demonstrated a positivity bias in affective updating, which was absent in SAD. Further, self-performance ratings revealed group differences in learning from positive feedback—a difference that endured at an average of 1 year follow up. These findings demonstrate the presence and long-term endurance of positively biased social learning about the self among healthy adults, a bias that is absent or reversed among socially anxious adults.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1528-3542 ; E-ISSN: 1931-1516 ; DOI: 10.1037/emo0000296
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1528-3542
  • 15283542
  • 1931-1516
  • 19311516
url: Link


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titleSocial Anxiety is Characterized by Biased Learning About Performance and the Self
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subjectSocial Anxiety Disorder ; Learning ; Social Emotions ; Positivity Bias ; Feedback Monitoring
descriptionPeople learn about their self from social information, and recent work suggests that healthy adults show a positive bias for learning self-related information. In contrast, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by a negative view of the self, yet what causes and maintains this negative self-view is not well understood. Here the authors use a novel experimental paradigm and computational model to test the hypothesis that biased social learning regarding self-evaluation and self-feelings represents a core feature that distinguishes adults with SAD from healthy controls. Twenty-one adults with SAD and 35 healthy controls (HCs) performed a speech in front of 3 judges. They subsequently evaluated themselves and received performance feedback from the judges and then rated how they felt about themselves and the judges. Affective updating (i.e., change in feelings about the self over time, in response to feedback from the judges) was modeled using an adapted Rescorla-Wagner learning model. HCs demonstrated a positivity bias in affective updating, which was absent in SAD. Further, self-performance ratings revealed group differences in learning from positive feedback—a difference that endured at an average of 1 year follow up. These findings demonstrate the presence and long-term endurance of positively biased social learning about the self among healthy adults, a bias that is absent or reversed among socially anxious adults.
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abstractPeople learn about their self from social information, and recent work suggests that healthy adults show a positive bias for learning self-related information. In contrast, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by a negative view of the self, yet what causes and maintains this negative self-view is not well understood. Here the authors use a novel experimental paradigm and computational model to test the hypothesis that biased social learning regarding self-evaluation and self-feelings represents a core feature that distinguishes adults with SAD from healthy controls. Twenty-one adults with SAD and 35 healthy controls (HCs) performed a speech in front of 3 judges. They subsequently evaluated themselves and received performance feedback from the judges and then rated how they felt about themselves and the judges. Affective updating (i.e., change in feelings about the self over time, in response to feedback from the judges) was modeled using an adapted Rescorla-Wagner learning model. HCs demonstrated a positivity bias in affective updating, which was absent in SAD. Further, self-performance ratings revealed group differences in learning from positive feedback—a difference that endured at an average of 1 year follow up. These findings demonstrate the presence and long-term endurance of positively biased social learning about the self among healthy adults, a bias that is absent or reversed among socially anxious adults.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/emo0000296
date2017-12