schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

The Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior

Because of the unprecedented pace of globalization, foreign experiences are increasingly common and valued. Past research has focused on the benefits of foreign experiences, including enhanced creativity and reduced intergroup bias. In contrast, the present work uncovers a potential dark side of for... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2017, Vol.112(1), pp.1-16
Main Author: Lu, Jackson G.
Other Authors: Quoidbach, Jordi , Gino, Francesca , Chakroff, Alek , Maddux, William W. , Galinsky, Adam D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000068
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000068
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: apa_articles10.1037/pspa0000068
title: The Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior
format: Article
creator:
  • Lu, Jackson G.
  • Quoidbach, Jordi
  • Gino, Francesca
  • Chakroff, Alek
  • Maddux, William W.
  • Galinsky, Adam D.
subjects:
  • Culture
  • Foreign Experiences
  • Moral Relativism
  • Morality
  • Unethical Behavior
ispartof: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2017, Vol.112(1), pp.1-16
description: Because of the unprecedented pace of globalization, foreign experiences are increasingly common and valued. Past research has focused on the benefits of foreign experiences, including enhanced creativity and reduced intergroup bias. In contrast, the present work uncovers a potential dark side of foreign experiences: increased immoral behavior. We propose that broad foreign experiences (i.e., experiences in multiple foreign countries) foster not only cognitive flexibility but also moral flexibility. Using multiple methods (longitudinal, correlational, and experimental), 8 studies ( N > 2,200) establish that broad foreign experiences can lead to immoral behavior by increasing moral relativism—the belief that morality is relative rather than absolute. The relationship between broad foreign experiences and immoral behavior was robust across a variety of cultural populations (anglophone, francophone), life stages (high school students, university students, MBA students, middle-aged adults), and 7 different measures of immorality. As individuals are exposed to diverse cultures, their moral compass may lose some of its precision.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-3514 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1315 ; DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000068
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-3514
  • 00223514
  • 1939-1315
  • 19391315
url: Link


@attributes
ID907500070
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1037/pspa0000068
sourceidapa_articles
recordidTN_apa_articles10.1037/pspa0000068
sourcesystemOther
pqid1856103721
galeid481822273
display
typearticle
titleThe Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior
creatorLu, Jackson G. ; Quoidbach, Jordi ; Gino, Francesca ; Chakroff, Alek ; Maddux, William W. ; Galinsky, Adam D.
ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2017, Vol.112(1), pp.1-16
identifier
subjectCulture ; Foreign Experiences ; Moral Relativism ; Morality ; Unethical Behavior
descriptionBecause of the unprecedented pace of globalization, foreign experiences are increasingly common and valued. Past research has focused on the benefits of foreign experiences, including enhanced creativity and reduced intergroup bias. In contrast, the present work uncovers a potential dark side of foreign experiences: increased immoral behavior. We propose that broad foreign experiences (i.e., experiences in multiple foreign countries) foster not only cognitive flexibility but also moral flexibility. Using multiple methods (longitudinal, correlational, and experimental), 8 studies ( N > 2,200) establish that broad foreign experiences can lead to immoral behavior by increasing moral relativism—the belief that morality is relative rather than absolute. The relationship between broad foreign experiences and immoral behavior was robust across a variety of cultural populations (anglophone, francophone), life stages (high school students, university students, MBA students, middle-aged adults), and 7 different measures of immorality. As individuals are exposed to diverse cultures, their moral compass may lose some of its precision.
languageeng
source
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000068$$EView_this_record_in_PsycARTICLES
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Lu, Jackson G.
1Quoidbach, Jordi
2Gino, Francesca
3Chakroff, Alek
4Maddux, William W.
5Galinsky, Adam D.
titleThe Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior
descriptionBecause of the unprecedented pace of globalization, foreign experiences are increasingly common and valued. Past research has focused on the benefits of foreign experiences, including enhanced creativity and reduced intergroup bias. In contrast, the present work uncovers a potential dark side of foreign experiences: increased immoral behavior. We propose that broad foreign experiences (i.e., experiences in multiple foreign countries) foster not only cognitive flexibility but also moral flexibility. Using multiple methods (longitudinal, correlational, and experimental), 8 studies ( N > 2,200) establish that broad foreign experiences can lead to immoral behavior by increasing moral relativism—the belief that morality is relative rather than absolute. The relationship between broad foreign experiences and immoral behavior was robust across a variety of cultural populations (anglophone, francophone), life stages (high school students, university students, MBA students, middle-aged adults), and 7 different measures of immorality. As individuals are exposed to diverse cultures, their moral compass may lose some of its precision.
subject
0Culture
1Foreign Experiences
2Moral Relativism
3Morality
4Unethical Behavior
general
0English
110.1037/pspa0000068
2PsycARTICLES (American Psychological Association)
sourceidapa_articles
recordidapa_articles10.1037/pspa0000068
issn
00022-3514
100223514
21939-1315
319391315
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2017
addtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
searchscopeapa_articles
scopeapa_articles
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages, galeid]
sort
titleThe Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior
authorLu, Jackson G. ; Quoidbach, Jordi ; Gino, Francesca ; Chakroff, Alek ; Maddux, William W. ; Galinsky, Adam D.
creationdate20170100
facets
frbrgroupid7499388890061554177
frbrtype5
newrecords20170103
languageeng
creationdate2017
topic
0Culture
1Foreign Experiences
2Moral Relativism
3Morality
4Unethical Behavior
collectionPsycARTICLES (American Psychological Association)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Lu, Jackson G.
1Quoidbach, Jordi
2Gino, Francesca
3Chakroff, Alek
4Maddux, William W.
5Galinsky, Adam D.
jtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Lu
1Quoidbach
2Gino
3Chakroff
4Maddux
5Galinsky
aufirst
0Jackson G.
1Jordi
2Francesca
3Alek
4William W.
5Adam D.
au
0Lu, Jackson G.
1Quoidbach, Jordi
2Gino, Francesca
3Chakroff, Alek
4Maddux, William W.
5Galinsky, Adam D.
atitleThe Dark Side of Going Abroad: How Broad Foreign Experiences Increase Immoral Behavior
jtitleJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
risdate201701
volume112
issue1
spage1
epage16
pages1-16
issn0022-3514
eissn1939-1315
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBecause of the unprecedented pace of globalization, foreign experiences are increasingly common and valued. Past research has focused on the benefits of foreign experiences, including enhanced creativity and reduced intergroup bias. In contrast, the present work uncovers a potential dark side of foreign experiences: increased immoral behavior. We propose that broad foreign experiences (i.e., experiences in multiple foreign countries) foster not only cognitive flexibility but also moral flexibility. Using multiple methods (longitudinal, correlational, and experimental), 8 studies ( N > 2,200) establish that broad foreign experiences can lead to immoral behavior by increasing moral relativism—the belief that morality is relative rather than absolute. The relationship between broad foreign experiences and immoral behavior was robust across a variety of cultural populations (anglophone, francophone), life stages (high school students, university students, MBA students, middle-aged adults), and 7 different measures of immorality. As individuals are exposed to diverse cultures, their moral compass may lose some of its precision.
pubAmerican Psychological Association
doi10.1037/pspa0000068
date2017-01