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Implementation Science and School Psychology

The APA Division 16 Working Group on Translating Science to Practice contends that implementation science is essential to the process of translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into the unique context of the schools, and that increasing attention to implementation will lead to the improvemen... Full description

Journal Title: School Psychology Quarterly 2013, Vol.28(2), pp.77-100
Main Author: Forman, Susan G.
Other Authors: Shapiro, Edward S. , Codding, Robin S. , Gonzales, Jorge E. , Reddy, Linda A. , Rosenfield, Sylvia A. , Sanetti, Lisa M. H. , Stoiber, Karen C.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1045-3830 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1560 ; DOI: 10.1037/spq0000019
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/spq0000019
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recordid: apa_articles10.1037/spq0000019
title: Implementation Science and School Psychology
format: Article
creator:
  • Forman, Susan G.
  • Shapiro, Edward S.
  • Codding, Robin S.
  • Gonzales, Jorge E.
  • Reddy, Linda A.
  • Rosenfield, Sylvia A.
  • Sanetti, Lisa M. H.
  • Stoiber, Karen C.
subjects:
  • Implementation Science
  • Evidence-Based Intervention
  • School Psychology
ispartof: School Psychology Quarterly, 2013, Vol.28(2), pp.77-100
description: The APA Division 16 Working Group on Translating Science to Practice contends that implementation science is essential to the process of translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into the unique context of the schools, and that increasing attention to implementation will lead to the improvement of school psychological services and school learning environments. Key elements of implementation and implementation science are described. Four critical issues for implementation science in school psychology are presented: barriers to implementation, improving intervention fidelity and identifying core intervention components, implementation with diverse client populations, and implementation in diverse settings. What is known and what researchers need to investigate for each set of issues is addressed. A discussion of implementation science methods and measures is included. Finally, implications for research, training and practice are presented.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1045-3830 ; E-ISSN: 1939-1560 ; DOI: 10.1037/spq0000019
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1045-3830
  • 10453830
  • 1939-1560
  • 19391560
url: Link


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descriptionThe APA Division 16 Working Group on Translating Science to Practice contends that implementation science is essential to the process of translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into the unique context of the schools, and that increasing attention to implementation will lead to the improvement of school psychological services and school learning environments. Key elements of implementation and implementation science are described. Four critical issues for implementation science in school psychology are presented: barriers to implementation, improving intervention fidelity and identifying core intervention components, implementation with diverse client populations, and implementation in diverse settings. What is known and what researchers need to investigate for each set of issues is addressed. A discussion of implementation science methods and measures is included. Finally, implications for research, training and practice are presented.
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titleImplementation Science and School Psychology
descriptionThe APA Division 16 Working Group on Translating Science to Practice contends that implementation science is essential to the process of translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into the unique context of the schools, and that increasing attention to implementation will lead to the improvement of school psychological services and school learning environments. Key elements of implementation and implementation science are described. Four critical issues for implementation science in school psychology are presented: barriers to implementation, improving intervention fidelity and identifying core intervention components, implementation with diverse client populations, and implementation in diverse settings. What is known and what researchers need to investigate for each set of issues is addressed. A discussion of implementation science methods and measures is included. Finally, implications for research, training and practice are presented.
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abstractThe APA Division 16 Working Group on Translating Science to Practice contends that implementation science is essential to the process of translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into the unique context of the schools, and that increasing attention to implementation will lead to the improvement of school psychological services and school learning environments. Key elements of implementation and implementation science are described. Four critical issues for implementation science in school psychology are presented: barriers to implementation, improving intervention fidelity and identifying core intervention components, implementation with diverse client populations, and implementation in diverse settings. What is known and what researchers need to investigate for each set of issues is addressed. A discussion of implementation science methods and measures is included. Finally, implications for research, training and practice are presented.
pubEducational Publishing Foundation
doi10.1037/spq0000019
date2013-06