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Genetic testing now allows us to reliably predict whether people will develop certain late-onset genetic conditions such as Huntington disease. If you were at risk for a genetic disease which will only take effect in the distant future, would you want to know now whether you will later develop this... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Medical Ethics September 2012 Vol.38(9), p.517
Main Author: Kahane, Guy
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Institute of Medical Ethics
ID: ISSN: 0306-6800 ; E-ISSN: 1473-4257 ; DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2012-101003
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recordid: bmj_journals10.1136/medethics-2012-101003
title: Highlights from this issue
format: Article
creator:
  • Kahane, Guy
subjects:
  • Abortion
ispartof: Journal of Medical Ethics September 2012, Vol.38(9), p.517
description: Genetic testing now allows us to reliably predict whether people will develop certain late-onset genetic conditions such as Huntington disease. If you were at risk for a genetic disease which will only take effect in the distant future, would you want to know now whether you will later develop this disease? This can be a profoundly difficult question for many. But from a clinical point of view, the question is often relatively simple: we should let patients decide whether to undergo such genetic testing. It's their difficult decision to make. Things get more complicated when we consider the use of predictive genetic testing in minors, for conditions that will only manifest themselves in adulthood. Many oppose this kind of testing. They think we should wait until the child grows older, and can decide for herself. Others object that this ignores the interests of the child, as well as those of the parents, who could, for example, make appropriate future plans.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0306-6800 ; E-ISSN: 1473-4257 ; DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2012-101003
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 03066800
  • 14734257
  • 0306-6800
  • 1473-4257
url: Link


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abstractGenetic testing now allows us to reliably predict whether people will develop certain late-onset genetic conditions such as Huntington disease. If you were at risk for a genetic disease which will only take effect in the distant future, would you want to know now whether you will later develop this disease? This can be a profoundly difficult question for many. But from a clinical point of view, the question is often relatively simple: we should let patients decide whether to undergo such genetic testing. It's their difficult decision to make. Things get more complicated when we consider the use of predictive genetic testing in minors, for conditions that will only manifest themselves in adulthood. Many oppose this kind of testing. They think we should wait until the child grows older, and can decide for herself. Others object that this ignores the interests of the child, as well as those of the parents, who could, for example, make appropriate future plans.
pubBMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Institute of Medical Ethics
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pages517-518
date2012-09