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Exploration of the influence of insecure attachment and parental maltreatment on the incidence and course of adult clinical depression

Abstract Background Both childhood maltreatment and insecure attachment are known to be associated with depression in adulthood. The extent insecure attachment increases the risk of adult clinical depression over that of parental maltreatment among women in the general population is explored, using... Full description

Journal Title: Psychological Medicine 2019, Vol.49(6), pp.1025-1032
Main Author: Brown, George W
Other Authors: Harris, Tirril O , Craig, Thomas K. J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0033-2917 ; E-ISSN: 1469-8978 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0033291718001721
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recordid: cambridgeS0033291718001721
title: Exploration of the influence of insecure attachment and parental maltreatment on the incidence and course of adult clinical depression
format: Article
creator:
  • Brown, George W
  • Harris, Tirril O
  • Craig, Thomas K. J
subjects:
  • Original Articles
  • Adult Depression
  • Chaotic Life Style
  • Insecure Attachment Types
  • Parental Maltreatment
  • Physical Abuse By Mother
ispartof: Psychological Medicine, 2019, Vol.49(6), pp.1025-1032
description: Abstract Background Both childhood maltreatment and insecure attachment are known to be associated with depression in adulthood. The extent insecure attachment increases the risk of adult clinical depression over that of parental maltreatment among women in the general population is explored, using those at high risk because of their selection for parental maltreatment together with an unselected sample. Methods Semi-structured interviews and investigator-based measures are employed. Results Insecure attachment is highly associated with parental maltreatment with both contributing to the risk of depression, with attachment making a substantial independent contribution. Risk of depression did not vary by type of insecure attachment, but the core pathways of the dismissive and enmeshed involved the whole life course in terms of greater experience of a mother's physical abuse and their own anger as an adult, with both related to adult depression being more often provoked by a severely threatening event involving humiliation rather than loss . By contrast, depression of the insecure fearful and withdrawn was more closely associated with both current low self-esteem and an inadequately supportive core relationship. In terms of depression taking a chronic course, insecure attachment was again a key risk factor, but with this now closely linked with the early experience of a chaotic life style but with this involving only a modest number of women. Conclusions Both insecure attachment and parental maltreatment contribute to an increased risk of depression with complex effects involving types of insecure attachment.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0033-2917 ; E-ISSN: 1469-8978 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0033291718001721
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00332917
  • 0033-2917
  • 14698978
  • 1469-8978
url: Link


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titleExploration of the influence of insecure attachment and parental maltreatment on the incidence and course of adult clinical depression
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subjectOriginal Articles; Adult Depression; Chaotic Life Style; Insecure Attachment Types; Parental Maltreatment; Physical Abuse By Mother
descriptionAbstract Background Both childhood maltreatment and insecure attachment are known to be associated with depression in adulthood. The extent insecure attachment increases the risk of adult clinical depression over that of parental maltreatment among women in the general population is explored, using those at high risk because of their selection for parental maltreatment together with an unselected sample. Methods Semi-structured interviews and investigator-based measures are employed. Results Insecure attachment is highly associated with parental maltreatment with both contributing to the risk of depression, with attachment making a substantial independent contribution. Risk of depression did not vary by type of insecure attachment, but the core pathways of the dismissive and enmeshed involved the whole life course in terms of greater experience of a mother's physical abuse and their own anger as an adult, with both related to adult depression being more often provoked by a severely threatening event involving humiliation rather than loss . By contrast, depression of the insecure fearful and withdrawn was more closely associated with both current low self-esteem and an inadequately supportive core relationship. In terms of depression taking a chronic course, insecure attachment was again a key risk factor, but with this now closely linked with the early experience of a chaotic life style but with this involving only a modest number of women. Conclusions Both insecure attachment and parental maltreatment contribute to an increased risk of depression with complex effects involving types of insecure attachment.
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titleExploration of the influence of insecure attachment and parental maltreatment on the incidence and course of adult clinical depression
descriptionAbstract Background Both childhood maltreatment and insecure attachment are known to be associated with depression in adulthood. The extent insecure attachment increases the risk of adult clinical depression over that of parental maltreatment among women in the general population is explored, using those at high risk because of their selection for parental maltreatment together with an unselected sample. Methods Semi-structured interviews and investigator-based measures are employed. Results Insecure attachment is highly associated with parental maltreatment with both contributing to the risk of depression, with attachment making a substantial independent contribution. Risk of depression did not vary by type of insecure attachment, but the core pathways of the dismissive and enmeshed involved the whole life course in terms of greater experience of a mother's physical abuse and their own anger as an adult, with both related to adult depression being more often provoked by a severely threatening event involving humiliation rather than loss . By contrast, depression of the insecure fearful and withdrawn was more closely associated with both current low self-esteem and an inadequately supportive core relationship. In terms of depression taking a chronic course, insecure attachment was again a key risk factor, but with this now closely linked with the early experience of a chaotic life style but with this involving only a modest number of women. Conclusions Both insecure attachment and parental maltreatment contribute to an increased risk of depression with complex effects involving types of insecure attachment.
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abstractAbstract Background Both childhood maltreatment and insecure attachment are known to be associated with depression in adulthood. The extent insecure attachment increases the risk of adult clinical depression over that of parental maltreatment among women in the general population is explored, using those at high risk because of their selection for parental maltreatment together with an unselected sample. Methods Semi-structured interviews and investigator-based measures are employed. Results Insecure attachment is highly associated with parental maltreatment with both contributing to the risk of depression, with attachment making a substantial independent contribution. Risk of depression did not vary by type of insecure attachment, but the core pathways of the dismissive and enmeshed involved the whole life course in terms of greater experience of a mother's physical abuse and their own anger as an adult, with both related to adult depression being more often provoked by a severely threatening event involving humiliation rather than loss . By contrast, depression of the insecure fearful and withdrawn was more closely associated with both current low self-esteem and an inadequately supportive core relationship. In terms of depression taking a chronic course, insecure attachment was again a key risk factor, but with this now closely linked with the early experience of a chaotic life style but with this involving only a modest number of women. Conclusions Both insecure attachment and parental maltreatment contribute to an increased risk of depression with complex effects involving types of insecure attachment.
pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S0033291718001721
pages1025-1032
date2019-04