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Estimating the time at which commercial broiler flocks in Great Britain become infected with Campylobacter : a Bayesian approach

SUMMARY Campylobacter is a common cause of intestinal disease in humans and is often linked to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. Despite considerable research on the topic there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with Campylobacter epidemiology. A Bayesian model framework was ap... Full description

Journal Title: Epidemiology and Infection 2014, Vol.142(9), pp.1884-1892
Main Author: Goddard, A. D
Other Authors: Arnold, M. E , Allen, V. M , Snary, E. L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0950-2688 ; E-ISSN: 1469-4409 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0950268813002926
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recordid: cambridgeS0950268813002926
title: Estimating the time at which commercial broiler flocks in Great Britain become infected with Campylobacter : a Bayesian approach
format: Article
creator:
  • Goddard, A. D
  • Arnold, M. E
  • Allen, V. M
  • Snary, E. L
subjects:
  • Original Papers
  • Gastrointestinal
  • Bayesian Analysis
  • Campylobacter
  • Epidemiology
  • Poultry
ispartof: Epidemiology and Infection, 2014, Vol.142(9), pp.1884-1892
description: SUMMARY Campylobacter is a common cause of intestinal disease in humans and is often linked to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. Despite considerable research on the topic there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with Campylobacter epidemiology. A Bayesian model framework was applied to multiple longitudinal datasets on Campylobacter infection in UK broiler flocks to estimate the time at which each flock was first infected with Campylobacter . The model results suggest that the day of first infection ranges from 10 to 45 days; however, over half had a time of infection between 30 and 35 days. When considering only those flocks which were thinned, 48% had an estimated day of infection within 2 days of the day of thinning, thus suggesting an association between thinning and Campylobacter infection. These results demonstrate how knowledge of the time of infection can be correlated to known events to identify potential risk factors for infection.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0950-2688 ; E-ISSN: 1469-4409 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0950268813002926
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 09502688
  • 0950-2688
  • 14694409
  • 1469-4409
url: Link


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titleEstimating the time at which commercial broiler flocks in Great Britain become infected with Campylobacter : a Bayesian approach
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subjectOriginal Papers; Gastrointestinal; Bayesian Analysis; Campylobacter; Epidemiology; Poultry
descriptionSUMMARY Campylobacter is a common cause of intestinal disease in humans and is often linked to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. Despite considerable research on the topic there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with Campylobacter epidemiology. A Bayesian model framework was applied to multiple longitudinal datasets on Campylobacter infection in UK broiler flocks to estimate the time at which each flock was first infected with Campylobacter . The model results suggest that the day of first infection ranges from 10 to 45 days; however, over half had a time of infection between 30 and 35 days. When considering only those flocks which were thinned, 48% had an estimated day of infection within 2 days of the day of thinning, thus suggesting an association between thinning and Campylobacter infection. These results demonstrate how knowledge of the time of infection can be correlated to known events to identify potential risk factors for infection.
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titleEstimating the time at which commercial broiler flocks in Great Britain become infected with Campylobacter : a Bayesian approach
descriptionSUMMARY Campylobacter is a common cause of intestinal disease in humans and is often linked to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. Despite considerable research on the topic there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with Campylobacter epidemiology. A Bayesian model framework was applied to multiple longitudinal datasets on Campylobacter infection in UK broiler flocks to estimate the time at which each flock was first infected with Campylobacter . The model results suggest that the day of first infection ranges from 10 to 45 days; however, over half had a time of infection between 30 and 35 days. When considering only those flocks which were thinned, 48% had an estimated day of infection within 2 days of the day of thinning, thus suggesting an association between thinning and Campylobacter infection. These results demonstrate how knowledge of the time of infection can be correlated to known events to identify potential risk factors for infection.
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abstractSUMMARY Campylobacter is a common cause of intestinal disease in humans and is often linked to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. Despite considerable research on the topic there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with Campylobacter epidemiology. A Bayesian model framework was applied to multiple longitudinal datasets on Campylobacter infection in UK broiler flocks to estimate the time at which each flock was first infected with Campylobacter . The model results suggest that the day of first infection ranges from 10 to 45 days; however, over half had a time of infection between 30 and 35 days. When considering only those flocks which were thinned, 48% had an estimated day of infection within 2 days of the day of thinning, thus suggesting an association between thinning and Campylobacter infection. These results demonstrate how knowledge of the time of infection can be correlated to known events to identify potential risk factors for infection.
pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S0950268813002926
pages1884-1892
date2014-09