schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence

Abstract Background The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Design Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and meta... Full description

Journal Title: Public Health Nutrition 2009, Vol.12(9A), pp.1607-1617
Main Author: Babio, Nancy
Other Authors: Bulló, Mònica , Salas-salvadó, Jordi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1368-9800 ; E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980009990449
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cambridgeS1368980009990449
title: Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence
format: Article
creator:
  • Babio, Nancy
  • Bulló, Mònica
  • Salas-salvadó, Jordi
subjects:
  • Mediterranean Diet
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Waist Circumference
  • Hdl-cholesterol
  • Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes
ispartof: Public Health Nutrition, 2009, Vol.12(9A), pp.1607-1617
description: Abstract Background The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Design Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome. Results Several components of Mediterranean diet patterns have been inversely related with body mass index. They are considered to be modulators of insulin resistance, can exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, improve atherogenic dyslipidemia or attenuate the inflammatory burden associated with metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, olive oil, legumes and fish, moderate in alcohol and low in red meat, processed meat, refined carbohydrates and whole-fat dairy products. Conclusions There is much evidence suggesting that the Mediterranean diet could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help to fight diseases related to chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1368-9800 ; E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980009990449
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 13689800
  • 1368-9800
  • 14752727
  • 1475-2727
url: Link


@attributes
ID821765798
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidS1368980009990449
sourceidcambridge
recordidTN_cambridgeS1368980009990449
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid21019368
cupidS1368980009990449
display
typearticle
titleMediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence
creatorBabio, Nancy ; Bulló, Mònica ; Salas-salvadó, Jordi
identifier
subjectMediterranean Diet; Metabolic Syndrome; Waist Circumference; Hdl-cholesterol; Blood Pressure; Diabetes
descriptionAbstract Background The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Design Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome. Results Several components of Mediterranean diet patterns have been inversely related with body mass index. They are considered to be modulators of insulin resistance, can exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, improve atherogenic dyslipidemia or attenuate the inflammatory burden associated with metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, olive oil, legumes and fish, moderate in alcohol and low in red meat, processed meat, refined carbohydrates and whole-fat dairy products. Conclusions There is much evidence suggesting that the Mediterranean diet could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help to fight diseases related to chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome.
source
lds402009
lds41Public Health Nutrition, 2009, Vol.12(9A), pp.1607-1617
lds44200909
lds45200909
ispartofPublic Health Nutrition, 2009, Vol.12(9A), pp.1607-1617
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Babio, Nancy
1Bulló, Mònica
2Salas-Salvadó, Jordi
titleMediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence
descriptionAbstract Background The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Design Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome. Results Several components of Mediterranean diet patterns have been inversely related with body mass index. They are considered to be modulators of insulin resistance, can exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, improve atherogenic dyslipidemia or attenuate the inflammatory burden associated with metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, olive oil, legumes and fish, moderate in alcohol and low in red meat, processed meat, refined carbohydrates and whole-fat dairy products. Conclusions There is much evidence suggesting that the Mediterranean diet could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help to fight diseases related to chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome.
subject
0Mediterranean diet
1Metabolic syndrome
2Waist circumference
3HDL-cholesterol
4Blood pressure
5Diabetes
general
010.1017/S1368980009990449
1Cambridge University Press
sourceidcambridge
recordidcambridgeS1368980009990449
issn
013689800
11368-9800
214752727
31475-2727
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2009
recordtypearticle
addtitlePublic Health Nutrition
searchscope
0cambridge
1Cambridge
2cjo
scope
0cambridge
1Cambridge
2cjo
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages, cupid]
sort
titleMediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence
authorBabio, Nancy ; Bulló, Mònica ; Salas-salvadó, Jordi
creationdate20090900
facets
frbrgroupid6360711197146383306
frbrtype5
topic
0Mediterranean diet
1Metabolic syndrome
2Waist circumference
3HDL-cholesterol
4Blood pressure
5Diabetes
collectionCambridge Journals (Cambridge University Press)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Babio, Nancy
1Bulló, Mònica
2Salas-salvadó, Jordi
jtitlePublic Health Nutrition
creationdate2009
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
aulast
0Babio
1Bulló
2Salas-Salvadó
aufirst
0Nancy
1Mònica
2Jordi
au
0Babio, Nancy
1Bulló, Mònica
2Salas-Salvadó, Jordi
atitleMediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence
jtitlePublic Health Nutrition
addtitlePublic Health Nutr.
risdate200909
volume12
issue9A
spage1607
epage1617
issn1368-9800
eissn1475-2727
formatarticle
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractAbstract Background The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Design Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome. Results Several components of Mediterranean diet patterns have been inversely related with body mass index. They are considered to be modulators of insulin resistance, can exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, improve atherogenic dyslipidemia or attenuate the inflammatory burden associated with metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, olive oil, legumes and fish, moderate in alcohol and low in red meat, processed meat, refined carbohydrates and whole-fat dairy products. Conclusions There is much evidence suggesting that the Mediterranean diet could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help to fight diseases related to chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome.
pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S1368980009990449
pages1607-17
date2009-09