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Serum ferritin contributes to racial or geographic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Taiwan

Abstract Objectives Asians and Pacific Islanders have higher circulating serum ferritin (SF) compared with Caucasians but the clinical significance of this is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Taiwanese Indigenous than Han Chinese. Genetically, Indigenous are rela... Full description

Journal Title: Public Health Nutrition 2014, Vol.17(7), pp.1498-1506
Main Author: Chang, Jung-Su
Other Authors: Lin, Shiue-Ming , Chao, Jane C-J , Chen, Yi-Chun , Wang, Chi-Mei , Chou, Ni-Hsin , Pan, Wen-Harn , Bai, Chyi-Huey
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ID: ISSN: 1368-9800 ; E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013001596
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title: Serum ferritin contributes to racial or geographic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Taiwan
format: Article
creator:
  • Chang, Jung-Su
  • Lin, Shiue-Ming
  • Chao, Jane C-J
  • Chen, Yi-Chun
  • Wang, Chi-Mei
  • Chou, Ni-Hsin
  • Pan, Wen-Harn
  • Bai, Chyi-Huey
subjects:
  • Epidemiology
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Serum Ferritin
  • Odds Ratio
  • Ethnicity
  • Taiwanese Indigenous
ispartof: Public Health Nutrition, 2014, Vol.17(7), pp.1498-1506
description: Abstract Objectives Asians and Pacific Islanders have higher circulating serum ferritin (SF) compared with Caucasians but the clinical significance of this is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Taiwanese Indigenous than Han Chinese. Genetically, Indigenous are related to Austronesians and account for 2 % of Taiwan's population. We tested the hypothesis that accumulation of Fe in the body contributes to the ethnic/racial disparities in MetS in Taiwan. Design A population-based, cross-sectional study. Setting National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan and Penghu Island. Subjects A total of 2638 healthy adults aged ≥19 years. Three ethnic groups were included. Results Han Chinese and Indigenous people had comparable levels of SF. Austronesia origin was independently associated with MetS (OR = 2·61, 95 % CI 2·02, 3·36). After multiple adjustments, the odds for MetS (OR = 2·49, 95 % CI 1·15, 5·28) was significantly higher among Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Hakka and Penghu Islanders yielded the lowest risks (OR = 1·08, 95 % CI 0·44, 2·65 and OR = 1·21, 95 % CI 0·52, 2·78, respectively). Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile had increased risk for abnormal levels of fasting glucose (OR = 2·34, 95 % CI 1·27, 4·29), TAG (OR = 1·94, 95 % CI 1·11, 3·39) and HDL-cholesterol (OR = 2·10, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·73) than those in the lowest SF tertile. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that ethnic/racial differences in body Fe store susceptibility may contribute to racial and geographic disparities in MetS.
language:
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identifier: ISSN: 1368-9800 ; E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013001596
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 13689800
  • 1368-9800
  • 14752727
  • 1475-2727
url: Link


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titleSerum ferritin contributes to racial or geographic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Taiwan
creatorChang, Jung-Su ; Lin, Shiue-Ming ; Chao, Jane C-J ; Chen, Yi-Chun ; Wang, Chi-Mei ; Chou, Ni-Hsin ; Pan, Wen-Harn ; Bai, Chyi-Huey
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subjectEpidemiology; Metabolic Syndrome; Serum Ferritin; Odds Ratio; Ethnicity; Taiwanese Indigenous
descriptionAbstract Objectives Asians and Pacific Islanders have higher circulating serum ferritin (SF) compared with Caucasians but the clinical significance of this is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Taiwanese Indigenous than Han Chinese. Genetically, Indigenous are related to Austronesians and account for 2 % of Taiwan's population. We tested the hypothesis that accumulation of Fe in the body contributes to the ethnic/racial disparities in MetS in Taiwan. Design A population-based, cross-sectional study. Setting National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan and Penghu Island. Subjects A total of 2638 healthy adults aged ≥19 years. Three ethnic groups were included. Results Han Chinese and Indigenous people had comparable levels of SF. Austronesia origin was independently associated with MetS (OR = 2·61, 95 % CI 2·02, 3·36). After multiple adjustments, the odds for MetS (OR = 2·49, 95 % CI 1·15, 5·28) was significantly higher among Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Hakka and Penghu Islanders yielded the lowest risks (OR = 1·08, 95 % CI 0·44, 2·65 and OR = 1·21, 95 % CI 0·52, 2·78, respectively). Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile had increased risk for abnormal levels of fasting glucose (OR = 2·34, 95 % CI 1·27, 4·29), TAG (OR = 1·94, 95 % CI 1·11, 3·39) and HDL-cholesterol (OR = 2·10, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·73) than those in the lowest SF tertile. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that ethnic/racial differences in body Fe store susceptibility may contribute to racial and geographic disparities in MetS.
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titleSerum ferritin contributes to racial or geographic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Taiwan
descriptionAbstract Objectives Asians and Pacific Islanders have higher circulating serum ferritin (SF) compared with Caucasians but the clinical significance of this is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Taiwanese Indigenous than Han Chinese. Genetically, Indigenous are related to Austronesians and account for 2 % of Taiwan's population. We tested the hypothesis that accumulation of Fe in the body contributes to the ethnic/racial disparities in MetS in Taiwan. Design A population-based, cross-sectional study. Setting National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan and Penghu Island. Subjects A total of 2638 healthy adults aged ≥19 years. Three ethnic groups were included. Results Han Chinese and Indigenous people had comparable levels of SF. Austronesia origin was independently associated with MetS (OR = 2·61, 95 % CI 2·02, 3·36). After multiple adjustments, the odds for MetS (OR = 2·49, 95 % CI 1·15, 5·28) was significantly higher among Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Hakka and Penghu Islanders yielded the lowest risks (OR = 1·08, 95 % CI 0·44, 2·65 and OR = 1·21, 95 % CI 0·52, 2·78, respectively). Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile had increased risk for abnormal levels of fasting glucose (OR = 2·34, 95 % CI 1·27, 4·29), TAG (OR = 1·94, 95 % CI 1·11, 3·39) and HDL-cholesterol (OR = 2·10, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·73) than those in the lowest SF tertile. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that ethnic/racial differences in body Fe store susceptibility may contribute to racial and geographic disparities in MetS.
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abstractAbstract Objectives Asians and Pacific Islanders have higher circulating serum ferritin (SF) compared with Caucasians but the clinical significance of this is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Taiwanese Indigenous than Han Chinese. Genetically, Indigenous are related to Austronesians and account for 2 % of Taiwan's population. We tested the hypothesis that accumulation of Fe in the body contributes to the ethnic/racial disparities in MetS in Taiwan. Design A population-based, cross-sectional study. Setting National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan and Penghu Island. Subjects A total of 2638 healthy adults aged ≥19 years. Three ethnic groups were included. Results Han Chinese and Indigenous people had comparable levels of SF. Austronesia origin was independently associated with MetS (OR = 2·61, 95 % CI 2·02, 3·36). After multiple adjustments, the odds for MetS (OR = 2·49, 95 % CI 1·15, 5·28) was significantly higher among Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Hakka and Penghu Islanders yielded the lowest risks (OR = 1·08, 95 % CI 0·44, 2·65 and OR = 1·21, 95 % CI 0·52, 2·78, respectively). Indigenous people in the highest SF tertile had increased risk for abnormal levels of fasting glucose (OR = 2·34, 95 % CI 1·27, 4·29), TAG (OR = 1·94, 95 % CI 1·11, 3·39) and HDL-cholesterol (OR = 2·10, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·73) than those in the lowest SF tertile. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that ethnic/racial differences in body Fe store susceptibility may contribute to racial and geographic disparities in MetS.
pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S1368980013001596
pages1498-1498506
date2014-07