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Phenotypic Evolution in Fossil Species: Pattern and Process

Since Darwin, scientists have looked to the fossil record with the hope of using it to document how the phenotypes of species change over substantial periods of time. How best to interpret this record has been controversial, but empirical and methodological advances have resolved at least two issues... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of earth and planetary sciences 2014, Vol.42 (1), p.421-441
Main Author: Hunt, Gene
Other Authors: Rabosky, Daniel L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 0084-6597
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recordid: cdi_annualreviews_primary_10_1146_annurev_earth_040809_152524
title: Phenotypic Evolution in Fossil Species: Pattern and Process
format: Article
creator:
  • Hunt, Gene
  • Rabosky, Daniel L
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • Biological evolution
  • Cladding
  • Earth
  • Evaluation
  • fossil time series
  • Fossils
  • Landscapes
  • Observations
  • Phenotype
  • phenotypic evolution
  • punctuated equilibrium
  • Speciation
  • stasis
  • Time
  • Transformations
  • trends
ispartof: Annual review of earth and planetary sciences, 2014, Vol.42 (1), p.421-441
description: Since Darwin, scientists have looked to the fossil record with the hope of using it to document how the phenotypes of species change over substantial periods of time. How best to interpret this record has been controversial, but empirical and methodological advances have resolved at least two issues about pattern: ( a ) directional transformations are seldom sustained over geological timescales, and ( b ) net rates of morphological change in fossil species are usually quite slow. Considerable uncertainty remains, however, about the processes responsible for these patterns, but most fruitful explanations use the framework of adaptive landscapes to consider the role of natural selection and other processes. An additional, unresolved issue is the claim that most phenotypic change is associated with speciation. A variety of methods, using data from both fossil and extant species, have supported such a link, at least in some clades and traits, but its prevalence and underlying mechanism remain unresolved.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0084-6597
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0084-6597
  • 1545-4495
url: Link


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descriptionSince Darwin, scientists have looked to the fossil record with the hope of using it to document how the phenotypes of species change over substantial periods of time. How best to interpret this record has been controversial, but empirical and methodological advances have resolved at least two issues about pattern: ( a ) directional transformations are seldom sustained over geological timescales, and ( b ) net rates of morphological change in fossil species are usually quite slow. Considerable uncertainty remains, however, about the processes responsible for these patterns, but most fruitful explanations use the framework of adaptive landscapes to consider the role of natural selection and other processes. An additional, unresolved issue is the claim that most phenotypic change is associated with speciation. A variety of methods, using data from both fossil and extant species, have supported such a link, at least in some clades and traits, but its prevalence and underlying mechanism remain unresolved.
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subjectAnalysis ; Biological evolution ; Cladding ; Earth ; Evaluation ; fossil time series ; Fossils ; Landscapes ; Observations ; Phenotype ; phenotypic evolution ; punctuated equilibrium ; Speciation ; stasis ; Time ; Transformations ; trends
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abstractSince Darwin, scientists have looked to the fossil record with the hope of using it to document how the phenotypes of species change over substantial periods of time. How best to interpret this record has been controversial, but empirical and methodological advances have resolved at least two issues about pattern: ( a ) directional transformations are seldom sustained over geological timescales, and ( b ) net rates of morphological change in fossil species are usually quite slow. Considerable uncertainty remains, however, about the processes responsible for these patterns, but most fruitful explanations use the framework of adaptive landscapes to consider the role of natural selection and other processes. An additional, unresolved issue is the claim that most phenotypic change is associated with speciation. A variety of methods, using data from both fossil and extant species, have supported such a link, at least in some clades and traits, but its prevalence and underlying mechanism remain unresolved.
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