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Rethinking Community Assembly through the Lens of Coexistence Theory

Although research on the role of competitive interactions during community assembly began decades ago, a recent revival of interest has led to new discoveries and research opportunities. Using contemporary coexistence theory that emphasizes stabilizing niche differences and relative fitness differen... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of ecology evolution, and systematics, 2012-12-01, Vol.43 (1), p.227-248
Main Author: HilleRisLambers, J
Other Authors: Adler, P.B , Harpole, W.S , Levine, J.M , Mayfield, M.M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Palo Alto, CA: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 1543-592X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=26803692
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recordid: cdi_annualreviews_primary_10_1146_annurev_ecolsys_110411_160411
title: Rethinking Community Assembly through the Lens of Coexistence Theory
format: Article
creator:
  • HilleRisLambers, J
  • Adler, P.B
  • Harpole, W.S
  • Levine, J.M
  • Mayfield, M.M
subjects:
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological taxonomies
  • biotic filters
  • Changes
  • clustering
  • Communities
  • Community development
  • Community ecology
  • Ecological competition
  • environmental filters
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General aspects
  • Habitats
  • overdispersion
  • Phenotypic traits
  • Phylogenetics
  • Plant communities
  • Plant populations
  • Plants
  • Population biology
  • relative fitness differences
  • Species diversity
  • stabilizing niche differences
  • Symbiosis
  • Synecology
  • Theory
  • Tropical rain forests
ispartof: Annual review of ecology, evolution, and systematics, 2012-12-01, Vol.43 (1), p.227-248
description: Although research on the role of competitive interactions during community assembly began decades ago, a recent revival of interest has led to new discoveries and research opportunities. Using contemporary coexistence theory that emphasizes stabilizing niche differences and relative fitness differences, we evaluate three empirical approaches for studying community assembly. We show that experimental manipulations of the abiotic or biotic environment, assessments of trait-phylogeny-environment relationships, and investigations of frequency-dependent population growth all suggest strong influences of stabilizing niche differences and fitness differences on the outcome of plant community assembly. Nonetheless, due to the limitations of these approaches applied in isolation, we still have a poor understanding of which niche axes and which traits determine the outcome of competition and community structure. Combining current approaches represents our best chance of achieving this goal, which is fundamental to conceptual ecology and to the management of plant communities under global change.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1543-592X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1543-592X
  • 1545-2069
url: Link


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descriptionAlthough research on the role of competitive interactions during community assembly began decades ago, a recent revival of interest has led to new discoveries and research opportunities. Using contemporary coexistence theory that emphasizes stabilizing niche differences and relative fitness differences, we evaluate three empirical approaches for studying community assembly. We show that experimental manipulations of the abiotic or biotic environment, assessments of trait-phylogeny-environment relationships, and investigations of frequency-dependent population growth all suggest strong influences of stabilizing niche differences and fitness differences on the outcome of plant community assembly. Nonetheless, due to the limitations of these approaches applied in isolation, we still have a poor understanding of which niche axes and which traits determine the outcome of competition and community structure. Combining current approaches represents our best chance of achieving this goal, which is fundamental to conceptual ecology and to the management of plant communities under global change.
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subjectAnimal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological taxonomies ; biotic filters ; Changes ; clustering ; Communities ; Community development ; Community ecology ; Ecological competition ; environmental filters ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General aspects ; Habitats ; overdispersion ; Phenotypic traits ; Phylogenetics ; Plant communities ; Plant populations ; Plants ; Population biology ; relative fitness differences ; Species diversity ; stabilizing niche differences ; Symbiosis ; Synecology ; Theory ; Tropical rain forests
ispartofAnnual review of ecology, evolution, and systematics, 2012-12-01, Vol.43 (1), p.227-248
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0Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 2012
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abstractAlthough research on the role of competitive interactions during community assembly began decades ago, a recent revival of interest has led to new discoveries and research opportunities. Using contemporary coexistence theory that emphasizes stabilizing niche differences and relative fitness differences, we evaluate three empirical approaches for studying community assembly. We show that experimental manipulations of the abiotic or biotic environment, assessments of trait-phylogeny-environment relationships, and investigations of frequency-dependent population growth all suggest strong influences of stabilizing niche differences and fitness differences on the outcome of plant community assembly. Nonetheless, due to the limitations of these approaches applied in isolation, we still have a poor understanding of which niche axes and which traits determine the outcome of competition and community structure. Combining current approaches represents our best chance of achieving this goal, which is fundamental to conceptual ecology and to the management of plant communities under global change.
copPalo Alto, CA
pubAnnual Reviews
doi10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-110411-160411