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Animal Phylogeny and Its Evolutionary Implications

In recent years, scientists have made remarkable progress reconstructing the animal phylogeny. There is broad agreement regarding many deep animal relationships, including the monophyly of animals, Bilateria, Protostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Spiralia. This stability now allows researchers to articulate t... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of ecology evolution, and systematics, 2014-11-23, Vol.45 (1), p.371-395
Main Author: Dunn, Casey W
Other Authors: Giribet, Gonzalo , Edgecombe, Gregory D , Hejnol, Andreas
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Palo Alto: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 1543-592X
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recordid: cdi_annualreviews_primary_10_1146_annurev_ecolsys_120213_091627
title: Animal Phylogeny and Its Evolutionary Implications
format: Article
creator:
  • Dunn, Casey W
  • Giribet, Gonzalo
  • Edgecombe, Gregory D
  • Hejnol, Andreas
subjects:
  • anatomy
  • Animal morphology
  • Animal populations
  • Animals
  • Bilateria
  • Ecdysozoa
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary biology
  • evolutionary developmental biology
  • Fossils
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic research
  • Genomes
  • Genomics
  • Metazoa
  • Morphology
  • Nervous system
  • Paleontology
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Protostomia
  • Research
  • Spiralia
  • Sponges
  • Taxa
  • Zoological research
  • Zoology
ispartof: Annual review of ecology, evolution, and systematics, 2014-11-23, Vol.45 (1), p.371-395
description: In recent years, scientists have made remarkable progress reconstructing the animal phylogeny. There is broad agreement regarding many deep animal relationships, including the monophyly of animals, Bilateria, Protostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Spiralia. This stability now allows researchers to articulate the diminishing number of remaining questions in terms of well-defined alternative hypotheses. These remaining questions include relationships at the base of the animal tree, the position of Xenacoelomorpha, and the internal relationships of Spiralia. Recent progress in the field of animal phylogeny has important implications for our understanding of the evolution of development, morphology, genomes, and other characters. A remarkable pattern emerges-there is far more homoplasy for all these characters than had previously been anticipated, even among many complex characters such as segmentation and nervous systems. The fossil record dates most deep branches of the animal tree to an evolutionary radiation in the early Cambrian with roots in the Late Neoproterozoic.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1543-592X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1543-592X
  • 1545-2069
url: Link


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descriptionIn recent years, scientists have made remarkable progress reconstructing the animal phylogeny. There is broad agreement regarding many deep animal relationships, including the monophyly of animals, Bilateria, Protostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Spiralia. This stability now allows researchers to articulate the diminishing number of remaining questions in terms of well-defined alternative hypotheses. These remaining questions include relationships at the base of the animal tree, the position of Xenacoelomorpha, and the internal relationships of Spiralia. Recent progress in the field of animal phylogeny has important implications for our understanding of the evolution of development, morphology, genomes, and other characters. A remarkable pattern emerges-there is far more homoplasy for all these characters than had previously been anticipated, even among many complex characters such as segmentation and nervous systems. The fossil record dates most deep branches of the animal tree to an evolutionary radiation in the early Cambrian with roots in the Late Neoproterozoic.
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subjectanatomy ; Animal morphology ; Animal populations ; Animals ; Bilateria ; Ecdysozoa ; Evolution ; Evolutionary biology ; evolutionary developmental biology ; Fossils ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic research ; Genomes ; Genomics ; Metazoa ; Morphology ; Nervous system ; Paleontology ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Protostomia ; Research ; Spiralia ; Sponges ; Taxa ; Zoological research ; Zoology
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abstractIn recent years, scientists have made remarkable progress reconstructing the animal phylogeny. There is broad agreement regarding many deep animal relationships, including the monophyly of animals, Bilateria, Protostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Spiralia. This stability now allows researchers to articulate the diminishing number of remaining questions in terms of well-defined alternative hypotheses. These remaining questions include relationships at the base of the animal tree, the position of Xenacoelomorpha, and the internal relationships of Spiralia. Recent progress in the field of animal phylogeny has important implications for our understanding of the evolution of development, morphology, genomes, and other characters. A remarkable pattern emerges-there is far more homoplasy for all these characters than had previously been anticipated, even among many complex characters such as segmentation and nervous systems. The fossil record dates most deep branches of the animal tree to an evolutionary radiation in the early Cambrian with roots in the Late Neoproterozoic.
copPalo Alto
pubAnnual Reviews
doi10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-120213-091627