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Additive effects of exotic plant abundance and land-use intensity on plant-pollinator interactions

The continuing spread of exotic plants and increasing human land-use are two major drivers of global change threatening ecosystems, species and their interactions. Separate effects of these two drivers on plant-pollinator interactions have been thoroughly studied, but we still lack an understanding... Full description

Journal Title: Oecologia 2013-11-01, Vol.173 (3), p.913-923
Main Author: Grass, Ingo
Other Authors: Berens, Dana Gertrud , Peter, Franziska , Farwig, Nina
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0029-8549
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recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1007_s00442_013_2688_6
title: Additive effects of exotic plant abundance and land-use intensity on plant-pollinator interactions
format: Article
creator:
  • Grass, Ingo
  • Berens, Dana Gertrud
  • Peter, Franziska
  • Farwig, Nina
subjects:
  • Adaptation, Biological - physiology
  • Analysis
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Autoecology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Climatology. Bioclimatology. Climate change
  • Communities
  • Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Ecosystems
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • External geophysics
  • Forest habitats
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General aspects
  • Hydrology/Water Resources
  • Insect pollination
  • Introduced Species
  • Invasive species
  • Land use
  • Life Sciences
  • Meteorology
  • Models, Biological
  • Native plants
  • Plant interaction
  • Plant Physiological Phenomena - physiology
  • Plant Sciences
  • PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS
  • Plant-microbe-animal interactions - Original research
  • Plants
  • Plants and fungi
  • Pollinating insects
  • Pollination
  • Pollination - physiology
  • Pollinators
  • South Africa
ispartof: Oecologia, 2013-11-01, Vol.173 (3), p.913-923
description: The continuing spread of exotic plants and increasing human land-use are two major drivers of global change threatening ecosystems, species and their interactions. Separate effects of these two drivers on plant-pollinator interactions have been thoroughly studied, but we still lack an understanding of combined and potential interactive effects. In a subtropical South African landscape, we studied 17 plant-pollinator networks along two gradients of relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity. In general, pollinator visitation rates were lower on exotic plants than on native ones. Surprisingly, while visitation rates on native plants increased with relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity, pollinator visitation on exotic plants decreased along the same gradients. There was a decrease in the specialization of plants on pollinators and vice versa with both drivers, regardless of plant origin. Decreases in pollinator specialization thereby seemed to be mediated by a species turnover towards habitat generalists. However, contrary to expectations, we detected no interactive effects between the two drivers. Our results suggest that exotic plants and land-use promote generalist plants and pollinators, while negatively affecting specialized plant-pollinator interactions. Weak integration and high specialization of exotic plants may have prevented interactive effects between exotic plants and land-use. Still, the additive effects of exotic plants and land-use on specialized plant-pollinator interactions would have been overlooked in a single-factor study. We therefore highlight the need to consider multiple drivers of global change in ecological research and conservation management.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-8549
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-8549
  • 1432-1939
url: Link


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titleAdditive effects of exotic plant abundance and land-use intensity on plant-pollinator interactions
creatorGrass, Ingo ; Berens, Dana Gertrud ; Peter, Franziska ; Farwig, Nina
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descriptionThe continuing spread of exotic plants and increasing human land-use are two major drivers of global change threatening ecosystems, species and their interactions. Separate effects of these two drivers on plant-pollinator interactions have been thoroughly studied, but we still lack an understanding of combined and potential interactive effects. In a subtropical South African landscape, we studied 17 plant-pollinator networks along two gradients of relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity. In general, pollinator visitation rates were lower on exotic plants than on native ones. Surprisingly, while visitation rates on native plants increased with relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity, pollinator visitation on exotic plants decreased along the same gradients. There was a decrease in the specialization of plants on pollinators and vice versa with both drivers, regardless of plant origin. Decreases in pollinator specialization thereby seemed to be mediated by a species turnover towards habitat generalists. However, contrary to expectations, we detected no interactive effects between the two drivers. Our results suggest that exotic plants and land-use promote generalist plants and pollinators, while negatively affecting specialized plant-pollinator interactions. Weak integration and high specialization of exotic plants may have prevented interactive effects between exotic plants and land-use. Still, the additive effects of exotic plants and land-use on specialized plant-pollinator interactions would have been overlooked in a single-factor study. We therefore highlight the need to consider multiple drivers of global change in ecological research and conservation management.
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subjectAdaptation, Biological - physiology ; Analysis ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Autoecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Climatology. Bioclimatology. Climate change ; Communities ; Conservation of Natural Resources - methods ; Earth, ocean, space ; Ecology ; Ecosystem ; Ecosystems ; Exact sciences and technology ; External geophysics ; Forest habitats ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General aspects ; Hydrology/Water Resources ; Insect pollination ; Introduced Species ; Invasive species ; Land use ; Life Sciences ; Meteorology ; Models, Biological ; Native plants ; Plant interaction ; Plant Physiological Phenomena - physiology ; Plant Sciences ; PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS ; Plant-microbe-animal interactions - Original research ; Plants ; Plants and fungi ; Pollinating insects ; Pollination ; Pollination - physiology ; Pollinators ; South Africa
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descriptionThe continuing spread of exotic plants and increasing human land-use are two major drivers of global change threatening ecosystems, species and their interactions. Separate effects of these two drivers on plant-pollinator interactions have been thoroughly studied, but we still lack an understanding of combined and potential interactive effects. In a subtropical South African landscape, we studied 17 plant-pollinator networks along two gradients of relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity. In general, pollinator visitation rates were lower on exotic plants than on native ones. Surprisingly, while visitation rates on native plants increased with relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity, pollinator visitation on exotic plants decreased along the same gradients. There was a decrease in the specialization of plants on pollinators and vice versa with both drivers, regardless of plant origin. Decreases in pollinator specialization thereby seemed to be mediated by a species turnover towards habitat generalists. However, contrary to expectations, we detected no interactive effects between the two drivers. Our results suggest that exotic plants and land-use promote generalist plants and pollinators, while negatively affecting specialized plant-pollinator interactions. Weak integration and high specialization of exotic plants may have prevented interactive effects between exotic plants and land-use. Still, the additive effects of exotic plants and land-use on specialized plant-pollinator interactions would have been overlooked in a single-factor study. We therefore highlight the need to consider multiple drivers of global change in ecological research and conservation management.
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7Climatology. Bioclimatology. Climate change
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titleAdditive effects of exotic plant abundance and land-use intensity on plant-pollinator interactions
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abstractThe continuing spread of exotic plants and increasing human land-use are two major drivers of global change threatening ecosystems, species and their interactions. Separate effects of these two drivers on plant-pollinator interactions have been thoroughly studied, but we still lack an understanding of combined and potential interactive effects. In a subtropical South African landscape, we studied 17 plant-pollinator networks along two gradients of relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity. In general, pollinator visitation rates were lower on exotic plants than on native ones. Surprisingly, while visitation rates on native plants increased with relative abundance of exotics and land-use intensity, pollinator visitation on exotic plants decreased along the same gradients. There was a decrease in the specialization of plants on pollinators and vice versa with both drivers, regardless of plant origin. Decreases in pollinator specialization thereby seemed to be mediated by a species turnover towards habitat generalists. However, contrary to expectations, we detected no interactive effects between the two drivers. Our results suggest that exotic plants and land-use promote generalist plants and pollinators, while negatively affecting specialized plant-pollinator interactions. Weak integration and high specialization of exotic plants may have prevented interactive effects between exotic plants and land-use. Still, the additive effects of exotic plants and land-use on specialized plant-pollinator interactions would have been overlooked in a single-factor study. We therefore highlight the need to consider multiple drivers of global change in ecological research and conservation management.
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doi10.1007/s00442-013-2688-6