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Residential Integration on the New Frontier: Immigrant Segregation in Established and New Destinations

This article explores patterns and determinants of immigrant segregation for 10 immigrant groups in established, new, and minor destination areas. Using a group-specific typology of metropolitan destinations, this study finds that without controls for immigrant-group and metropolitan-level character... Full description

Journal Title: Demography 2013-10-01, Vol.50 (5), p.1873-1896
Main Author: Hall, Matthew
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0070-3370
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23192394
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title: Residential Integration on the New Frontier: Immigrant Segregation in Established and New Destinations
format: Article
creator:
  • Hall, Matthew
subjects:
  • Acculturation
  • Article
  • Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
  • Demography
  • Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
  • general
  • Geography
  • Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
  • Hispanics
  • Housing
  • Housing - statistics & numerical data
  • Human migration
  • Humans
  • Immigrant populations
  • Immigration
  • Language
  • Medicine/Public Health
  • Metropolitan areas
  • New Destinations
  • Population Dynamics
  • Population Economics
  • Population growth
  • Population size
  • Racism
  • Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
  • Residential segregation
  • Segregation
  • Social integration
  • Social Sciences
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Sociology
  • United States
  • Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
  • White people
ispartof: Demography, 2013-10-01, Vol.50 (5), p.1873-1896
description: This article explores patterns and determinants of immigrant segregation for 10 immigrant groups in established, new, and minor destination areas. Using a group-specific typology of metropolitan destinations, this study finds that without controls for immigrant-group and metropolitan-level characteristics, immigrants in new destinations are more segregated and immigrants in minor destinations considerably more segregated than their counterparts in established destinations. Neither controls for immigrant-group acculturation or socioeconomic status nor those for demographic, housing, and economic features of metropolitan areas can fully account for the heightened levels of segregation observed in new and minor destinations. Overall, the results offer support for arguments that a diverse set of immigrant groups face challenges to residential incorporation in the new areas of settlement.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0070-3370
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0070-3370
  • 1533-7790
url: Link


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abstractThis article explores patterns and determinants of immigrant segregation for 10 immigrant groups in established, new, and minor destination areas. Using a group-specific typology of metropolitan destinations, this study finds that without controls for immigrant-group and metropolitan-level characteristics, immigrants in new destinations are more segregated and immigrants in minor destinations considerably more segregated than their counterparts in established destinations. Neither controls for immigrant-group acculturation or socioeconomic status nor those for demographic, housing, and economic features of metropolitan areas can fully account for the heightened levels of segregation observed in new and minor destinations. Overall, the results offer support for arguments that a diverse set of immigrant groups face challenges to residential incorporation in the new areas of settlement.
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