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Tea drinking, passive smoking, smoking deception and serum cotinine in the Scottish heart health study

Following a recent claim that the use of cotinine in body fluids, to assess passive smoking and smoking “deception”, was confounded by metabolic individuality, and by non-tobacco sources of dietary nicotine, particularly tea, data were examined from a large cross-sectional survey in a tea-drinking p... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of clinical epidemiology 1991, Vol.44 (12), p.1411-1414
Main Author: Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh
Other Authors: Woodward, Mark , Brown, C.A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New York, NY: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0895-4356
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=5180095
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title: Tea drinking, passive smoking, smoking deception and serum cotinine in the Scottish heart health study
format: Article
creator:
  • Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh
  • Woodward, Mark
  • Brown, C.A
subjects:
  • Addictive behaviors
  • Adult and adolescent clinical studies
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cotinine
  • Food frequency questionnaire
  • Medical sciences
  • Passive smoking
  • Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
  • Psychopathology. Psychiatry
  • Smoking deception
  • Tea drinking
ispartof: Journal of clinical epidemiology, 1991, Vol.44 (12), p.1411-1414
description: Following a recent claim that the use of cotinine in body fluids, to assess passive smoking and smoking “deception”, was confounded by metabolic individuality, and by non-tobacco sources of dietary nicotine, particularly tea, data were examined from a large cross-sectional survey in a tea-drinking population. In 3383 men and women aged 44–59 years from the Scottish Heart Health Study, defined as non-smokers, both by self-report and by low thiocyanate and expired air carbon monoxide levels, serum cotinine showed minimal association with self-reported daily average tea consumption. However, there was a strong correlation between degree of self-reported passive tobacco smoke exposure and median serum cotinine level. In the same survey, serum cotinine in 4144 self-reported non-smokers and in 3326 smokers showed entirely different distributions, but the same range, suggesting heavy nicotine intake in some “non-smokers”. These analyses confirm that cotinine levels in true non-smokers reflect far more the nicotine in inhaled ambient tobacco smoke than they do nicotine in tea. Some smoking “deceivers” have the same degree of exposure to nicotine as heavy smokers. Despite individual variability, the claim of confounding is poorly supported, and cotinine is confirmed as an indicator both of passive smoking and of smoking deception.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0895-4356
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0895-4356
  • 1878-5921
url: Link


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titleTea drinking, passive smoking, smoking deception and serum cotinine in the Scottish heart health study
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descriptionFollowing a recent claim that the use of cotinine in body fluids, to assess passive smoking and smoking “deception”, was confounded by metabolic individuality, and by non-tobacco sources of dietary nicotine, particularly tea, data were examined from a large cross-sectional survey in a tea-drinking population. In 3383 men and women aged 44–59 years from the Scottish Heart Health Study, defined as non-smokers, both by self-report and by low thiocyanate and expired air carbon monoxide levels, serum cotinine showed minimal association with self-reported daily average tea consumption. However, there was a strong correlation between degree of self-reported passive tobacco smoke exposure and median serum cotinine level. In the same survey, serum cotinine in 4144 self-reported non-smokers and in 3326 smokers showed entirely different distributions, but the same range, suggesting heavy nicotine intake in some “non-smokers”. These analyses confirm that cotinine levels in true non-smokers reflect far more the nicotine in inhaled ambient tobacco smoke than they do nicotine in tea. Some smoking “deceivers” have the same degree of exposure to nicotine as heavy smokers. Despite individual variability, the claim of confounding is poorly supported, and cotinine is confirmed as an indicator both of passive smoking and of smoking deception.
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subjectAddictive behaviors ; Adult and adolescent clinical studies ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cotinine ; Food frequency questionnaire ; Medical sciences ; Passive smoking ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychopathology. Psychiatry ; Smoking deception ; Tea drinking
ispartofJournal of clinical epidemiology, 1991, Vol.44 (12), p.1411-1414
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abstractFollowing a recent claim that the use of cotinine in body fluids, to assess passive smoking and smoking “deception”, was confounded by metabolic individuality, and by non-tobacco sources of dietary nicotine, particularly tea, data were examined from a large cross-sectional survey in a tea-drinking population. In 3383 men and women aged 44–59 years from the Scottish Heart Health Study, defined as non-smokers, both by self-report and by low thiocyanate and expired air carbon monoxide levels, serum cotinine showed minimal association with self-reported daily average tea consumption. However, there was a strong correlation between degree of self-reported passive tobacco smoke exposure and median serum cotinine level. In the same survey, serum cotinine in 4144 self-reported non-smokers and in 3326 smokers showed entirely different distributions, but the same range, suggesting heavy nicotine intake in some “non-smokers”. These analyses confirm that cotinine levels in true non-smokers reflect far more the nicotine in inhaled ambient tobacco smoke than they do nicotine in tea. Some smoking “deceivers” have the same degree of exposure to nicotine as heavy smokers. Despite individual variability, the claim of confounding is poorly supported, and cotinine is confirmed as an indicator both of passive smoking and of smoking deception.
copNew York, NY
pubElsevier Inc
doi10.1016/0895-4356(91)90102-F