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Nutrient Mobilization and Processing in Sonoran Desert Riparian Soils Following Artificial Re-Wetting

Research in river-floodplain systems has emphasized the importance of nutrient delivery by floodwaters, but the mechanisms by which floods make nutrients available are rarely evaluated. Using a laboratory re-wetting experiment, we evaluated the alternative hypotheses that increased nutrient concentr... Full description

Journal Title: Biogeochemistry 2004, Vol.70 (1), p.117-134
Main Author: HEFFERNAN, James B
Other Authors: SPONSELLER, Ryan A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Heidelberg: Kluwer Academic Publishers
ID: ISSN: 0168-2563
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=16385896
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recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1023_B_BIOG_0000049339_74391_14
title: Nutrient Mobilization and Processing in Sonoran Desert Riparian Soils Following Artificial Re-Wetting
format: Article
creator:
  • HEFFERNAN, James B
  • SPONSELLER, Ryan A
subjects:
  • Earth sciences
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • Flooded soils
  • Floods
  • Geochemistry
  • Groundwater
  • Hydrology
  • Hydrology. Hydrogeology
  • Mineralogy
  • Nitrates
  • Riparian soils
  • Sedimentary soils
  • Sediments
  • Silicates
  • Soil nutrients
  • Soil organic matter
  • Soil water
  • Soils
  • Surficial geology
  • Water geochemistry
ispartof: Biogeochemistry, 2004, Vol.70 (1), p.117-134
description: Research in river-floodplain systems has emphasized the importance of nutrient delivery by floodwaters, but the mechanisms by which floods make nutrients available are rarely evaluated. Using a laboratory re-wetting experiment, we evaluated the alternative hypotheses that increased nutrient concentrations in riparian groundwater during flash floods are due to (HI) elevated nutrient concentrations in surface floodwaters entering the riparian zone or (H2) re-mobilization of nutrients from riparian soils. We sampled soils from the riparian zone of a 400 m reach of Sycamore Creek, AZ. Two sub-samples from each soil were re-wetted with a solution that mimicked the chemistry of floodwaters, with one subsample simultaneously treated with a biocide. We also measured structural characteristics of soils (texture, organic matter, moisture, and extractable nutrients) to investigate relationships between these characteristics and response to re-wetting. Riparian soils exhibited considerable variation in physical and chemical structure. Soil organic matter, moisture, and texture co-varied among samples. Re-wetting increased concentrations of nitrate and ammonium, and decreased SRP, relative to initial concentrations. Live soils were significantly lower in NO3 -and SRP than biocide-treated samples. Extractable DIN pools were the best predictors of mobilization, and soil organic matter was strongly correlated with nitrate losses, probably via its relationship with microbial uptake. Nutrient mobilization and processing also varied considerably with depth, lateral position, and among plots. We estimate that 70-80% of N in riparian groundwater during flash floods is re-mobilized from riparian soils, but are unable to reject the hypothesis that flood inputs may be important sources of nutrients to riparian soils over longer time scales.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0168-2563
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0168-2563
  • 1573-515X
url: Link


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titleNutrient Mobilization and Processing in Sonoran Desert Riparian Soils Following Artificial Re-Wetting
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descriptionResearch in river-floodplain systems has emphasized the importance of nutrient delivery by floodwaters, but the mechanisms by which floods make nutrients available are rarely evaluated. Using a laboratory re-wetting experiment, we evaluated the alternative hypotheses that increased nutrient concentrations in riparian groundwater during flash floods are due to (HI) elevated nutrient concentrations in surface floodwaters entering the riparian zone or (H2) re-mobilization of nutrients from riparian soils. We sampled soils from the riparian zone of a 400 m reach of Sycamore Creek, AZ. Two sub-samples from each soil were re-wetted with a solution that mimicked the chemistry of floodwaters, with one subsample simultaneously treated with a biocide. We also measured structural characteristics of soils (texture, organic matter, moisture, and extractable nutrients) to investigate relationships between these characteristics and response to re-wetting. Riparian soils exhibited considerable variation in physical and chemical structure. Soil organic matter, moisture, and texture co-varied among samples. Re-wetting increased concentrations of nitrate and ammonium, and decreased SRP, relative to initial concentrations. Live soils were significantly lower in NO3 -and SRP than biocide-treated samples. Extractable DIN pools were the best predictors of mobilization, and soil organic matter was strongly correlated with nitrate losses, probably via its relationship with microbial uptake. Nutrient mobilization and processing also varied considerably with depth, lateral position, and among plots. We estimate that 70-80% of N in riparian groundwater during flash floods is re-mobilized from riparian soils, but are unable to reject the hypothesis that flood inputs may be important sources of nutrients to riparian soils over longer time scales.
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subjectEarth sciences ; Earth, ocean, space ; Exact sciences and technology ; Flooded soils ; Floods ; Geochemistry ; Groundwater ; Hydrology ; Hydrology. Hydrogeology ; Mineralogy ; Nitrates ; Riparian soils ; Sedimentary soils ; Sediments ; Silicates ; Soil nutrients ; Soil organic matter ; Soil water ; Soils ; Surficial geology ; Water geochemistry
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abstractResearch in river-floodplain systems has emphasized the importance of nutrient delivery by floodwaters, but the mechanisms by which floods make nutrients available are rarely evaluated. Using a laboratory re-wetting experiment, we evaluated the alternative hypotheses that increased nutrient concentrations in riparian groundwater during flash floods are due to (HI) elevated nutrient concentrations in surface floodwaters entering the riparian zone or (H2) re-mobilization of nutrients from riparian soils. We sampled soils from the riparian zone of a 400 m reach of Sycamore Creek, AZ. Two sub-samples from each soil were re-wetted with a solution that mimicked the chemistry of floodwaters, with one subsample simultaneously treated with a biocide. We also measured structural characteristics of soils (texture, organic matter, moisture, and extractable nutrients) to investigate relationships between these characteristics and response to re-wetting. Riparian soils exhibited considerable variation in physical and chemical structure. Soil organic matter, moisture, and texture co-varied among samples. Re-wetting increased concentrations of nitrate and ammonium, and decreased SRP, relative to initial concentrations. Live soils were significantly lower in NO3 -and SRP than biocide-treated samples. Extractable DIN pools were the best predictors of mobilization, and soil organic matter was strongly correlated with nitrate losses, probably via its relationship with microbial uptake. Nutrient mobilization and processing also varied considerably with depth, lateral position, and among plots. We estimate that 70-80% of N in riparian groundwater during flash floods is re-mobilized from riparian soils, but are unable to reject the hypothesis that flood inputs may be important sources of nutrients to riparian soils over longer time scales.
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pubKluwer Academic Publishers
doi10.1023/B:BIOG.0000049339.74391.14