schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

The impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study

Low socioeconomic status has for long been considered an important modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, plausibly by lower access to healthcare, lower therapeutic adhesion, and overlapping of other known risk factors. Nevertheless, whether family income and social isolation... Full description

Journal Title: Current medical research and opinion 2021-10-03, Vol.37 (10), p.1689-1695
Main Author: Barreto, Joaquim
Other Authors: Matos, Luís Carlos V. , Quinaglia, José Carlos , Sposito, Andrei C. , Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ID: ISSN: 0300-7995
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1080_03007995_2021_1965561
title: The impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Barreto, Joaquim
  • Matos, Luís Carlos V.
  • Quinaglia, José Carlos
  • Sposito, Andrei C.
  • Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
subjects:
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • coronary artery disease
  • family income
  • socioeconomic
ispartof: Current medical research and opinion, 2021-10-03, Vol.37 (10), p.1689-1695
description: Low socioeconomic status has for long been considered an important modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, plausibly by lower access to healthcare, lower therapeutic adhesion, and overlapping of other known risk factors. Nevertheless, whether family income and social isolation of poor communities seen in Brazil impact outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain scarcely understood. STEMI diagnosed patients were consecutively enrolled from the Brazilian Heart Study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02062554) and categorized according to median family income (US$350), address-based human development index (HDI), and distance between communities and a tertiary hospital (DCTH). Incidence of death after 48 months was compared by using adjusted Cox regressions. p-alues 
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0300-7995
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0300-7995
  • 1473-4877
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.566434
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_cross
recordidTN_cdi_crossref_primary_10_1080_03007995_2021_1965561
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid2560061202
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c198t-37eddb52f96c55842620874cdf8a7b27cd12cd41bde8a1db2927c3c3243046113
addsrcrecordideNp9kMlKBDEURYMo2A6fIGTpptokNbtywAkEF-o6vE5SGkkq7UsaKb_eFK1bV4_7OPcuDiEnnC0569gZKxlr-75eCib4kvdNXTd8hyx41ZZF1bXtLlnMTDFD--Qgxg_GuOj6fkGml3dDrV-DSjQM1IUvakcVvKFhzGl8K5JBT33ABM6maYb8FBSgtuAyOwCqZDO8hmTNmOI5RRM3LkU6YPA05f0rhG_rLIz03gAm-pw2ejoiewO4aI5_7yF5vb15ub4vHp_uHq4vHwvF-y4VZWu0XtVi6BtV110lGsG6tlJ66KBdiVZpLpSu-EqbDrheiT7_SlWKqmRVw3l5SE63u2sMnxsTk_Q2KuMcjCZsohR1w1jDs7uM1ltUYYgRzSDXaD3gJDmTs2r5p1rOquWv6ty72PayjoAevgI6LRNMLuCAMCobZfn_xA_h2ocC
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid2560061202
display
typearticle
titleThe impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorBarreto, Joaquim ; Matos, Luís Carlos V. ; Quinaglia, José Carlos ; Sposito, Andrei C. ; Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
creatorcontribBarreto, Joaquim ; Matos, Luís Carlos V. ; Quinaglia, José Carlos ; Sposito, Andrei C. ; Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
descriptionLow socioeconomic status has for long been considered an important modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, plausibly by lower access to healthcare, lower therapeutic adhesion, and overlapping of other known risk factors. Nevertheless, whether family income and social isolation of poor communities seen in Brazil impact outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain scarcely understood. STEMI diagnosed patients were consecutively enrolled from the Brazilian Heart Study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02062554) and categorized according to median family income (US$350), address-based human development index (HDI), and distance between communities and a tertiary hospital (DCTH). Incidence of death after 48 months was compared by using adjusted Cox regressions. p-alues < .05 were considered significant. Among 542 subjects, there were 69 deaths (13.2%) after a median follow-up time of 611 d (IQR = 724). The low-income group had a higher incidence of all-cause mortality compared to high income (18.4 vs. 7.1%; p = .001), with an adjusted HR of 2.16 (95%CI: 1.25-3.75; p = .006). Compared to high-income, low-income individuals had the worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction and less frequently received dual antiplatelet therapy and statins at hospital discharge. The population attributable risk of low income was 44.8%. HDI and DCTH did not influence the delay to reperfusion therapy nor the risk of death. Low income was independently associated with a higher long-term mortality rate, lower prescription of guidelines-recommended therapy, and worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction in STEMI patients.
identifier
0ISSN: 0300-7995
1EISSN: 1473-4877
2DOI: 10.1080/03007995.2021.1965561
languageeng
publisherTaylor & Francis
subjectacute coronary syndrome ; Acute myocardial infarction ; coronary artery disease ; family income ; socioeconomic
ispartofCurrent medical research and opinion, 2021-10-03, Vol.37 (10), p.1689-1695
rights2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group 2021
lds50peer_reviewed
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-c198t-37eddb52f96c55842620874cdf8a7b27cd12cd41bde8a1db2927c3c3243046113
orcidid0000-0001-6465-356X ; 0000-0002-9718-8956 ; 0000-0001-7127-2052
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontrib
0Barreto, Joaquim
1Matos, Luís Carlos V.
2Quinaglia, José Carlos
3Sposito, Andrei C.
4Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
title
0The impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study
1Current medical research and opinion
descriptionLow socioeconomic status has for long been considered an important modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, plausibly by lower access to healthcare, lower therapeutic adhesion, and overlapping of other known risk factors. Nevertheless, whether family income and social isolation of poor communities seen in Brazil impact outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain scarcely understood. STEMI diagnosed patients were consecutively enrolled from the Brazilian Heart Study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02062554) and categorized according to median family income (US$350), address-based human development index (HDI), and distance between communities and a tertiary hospital (DCTH). Incidence of death after 48 months was compared by using adjusted Cox regressions. p-alues < .05 were considered significant. Among 542 subjects, there were 69 deaths (13.2%) after a median follow-up time of 611 d (IQR = 724). The low-income group had a higher incidence of all-cause mortality compared to high income (18.4 vs. 7.1%; p = .001), with an adjusted HR of 2.16 (95%CI: 1.25-3.75; p = .006). Compared to high-income, low-income individuals had the worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction and less frequently received dual antiplatelet therapy and statins at hospital discharge. The population attributable risk of low income was 44.8%. HDI and DCTH did not influence the delay to reperfusion therapy nor the risk of death. Low income was independently associated with a higher long-term mortality rate, lower prescription of guidelines-recommended therapy, and worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction in STEMI patients.
subject
0acute coronary syndrome
1Acute myocardial infarction
2coronary artery disease
3family income
4socioeconomic
issn
00300-7995
11473-4877
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2021
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9kMlKBDEURYMo2A6fIGTpptokNbtywAkEF-o6vE5SGkkq7UsaKb_eFK1bV4_7OPcuDiEnnC0569gZKxlr-75eCib4kvdNXTd8hyx41ZZF1bXtLlnMTDFD--Qgxg_GuOj6fkGml3dDrV-DSjQM1IUvakcVvKFhzGl8K5JBT33ABM6maYb8FBSgtuAyOwCqZDO8hmTNmOI5RRM3LkU6YPA05f0rhG_rLIz03gAm-pw2ejoiewO4aI5_7yF5vb15ub4vHp_uHq4vHwvF-y4VZWu0XtVi6BtV110lGsG6tlJ66KBdiVZpLpSu-EqbDrheiT7_SlWKqmRVw3l5SE63u2sMnxsTk_Q2KuMcjCZsohR1w1jDs7uM1ltUYYgRzSDXaD3gJDmTs2r5p1rOquWv6ty72PayjoAevgI6LRNMLuCAMCobZfn_xA_h2ocC
startdate20211003
enddate20211003
creator
0Barreto, Joaquim
1Matos, Luís Carlos V.
2Quinaglia, José Carlos
3Sposito, Andrei C.
4Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
generalTaylor & Francis
scope
0AAYXX
1CITATION
27X8
orcidid
0https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6465-356X
1https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9718-8956
2https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7127-2052
sort
creationdate20211003
titleThe impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study
authorBarreto, Joaquim ; Matos, Luís Carlos V. ; Quinaglia, José Carlos ; Sposito, Andrei C. ; Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c198t-37eddb52f96c55842620874cdf8a7b27cd12cd41bde8a1db2927c3c3243046113
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2021
topic
0acute coronary syndrome
1Acute myocardial infarction
2coronary artery disease
3family income
4socioeconomic
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Barreto, Joaquim
1Matos, Luís Carlos V.
2Quinaglia, José Carlos
3Sposito, Andrei C.
4Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
collection
0CrossRef
1MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleCurrent medical research and opinion
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Barreto, Joaquim
1Matos, Luís Carlos V.
2Quinaglia, José Carlos
3Sposito, Andrei C.
4Carvalho, Luiz Sergio
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleThe impact of low income on long-term mortality of myocardial infarction patients: results from the Brazilian Heart Study
jtitleCurrent medical research and opinion
date2021-10-03
risdate2021
volume37
issue10
spage1689
epage1695
pages1689-1695
issn0300-7995
eissn1473-4877
abstractLow socioeconomic status has for long been considered an important modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, plausibly by lower access to healthcare, lower therapeutic adhesion, and overlapping of other known risk factors. Nevertheless, whether family income and social isolation of poor communities seen in Brazil impact outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain scarcely understood. STEMI diagnosed patients were consecutively enrolled from the Brazilian Heart Study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02062554) and categorized according to median family income (US$350), address-based human development index (HDI), and distance between communities and a tertiary hospital (DCTH). Incidence of death after 48 months was compared by using adjusted Cox regressions. p-alues < .05 were considered significant. Among 542 subjects, there were 69 deaths (13.2%) after a median follow-up time of 611 d (IQR = 724). The low-income group had a higher incidence of all-cause mortality compared to high income (18.4 vs. 7.1%; p = .001), with an adjusted HR of 2.16 (95%CI: 1.25-3.75; p = .006). Compared to high-income, low-income individuals had the worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction and less frequently received dual antiplatelet therapy and statins at hospital discharge. The population attributable risk of low income was 44.8%. HDI and DCTH did not influence the delay to reperfusion therapy nor the risk of death. Low income was independently associated with a higher long-term mortality rate, lower prescription of guidelines-recommended therapy, and worst clinical presentation of myocardial infarction in STEMI patients.
pubTaylor & Francis
doi10.1080/03007995.2021.1965561
orcidid
0https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6465-356X
1https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9718-8956
2https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7127-2052