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Halal clusters

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to propose a halal cluster concept to better organise production and trade of halal food. Design/methodology/approach – This paper builds further on previous work published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on halal food supply chains and value chains. A clus... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Islamic marketing 2015-03-09, Vol.6 (1), p.2-21
Main Author: Tieman, Marco
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ID: ISSN: 1759-0833
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recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1108_JIMA_05_2014_0034
title: Halal clusters
format: Article
creator:
  • Tieman, Marco
subjects:
  • Competition
  • Competitive advantage
  • Cosmetics
  • Food products
  • Food security
  • Food supply
  • Halal food
  • Islamic financing
  • Logistics
  • Manufacturing
  • Marketing
  • Marketing strategy/methods
  • Muslims
  • Productivity
  • Standards
  • Studies
  • Value chain
ispartof: Journal of Islamic marketing, 2015-03-09, Vol.6 (1), p.2-21
description: Purpose – The purpose of this study is to propose a halal cluster concept to better organise production and trade of halal food. Design/methodology/approach – This paper builds further on previous work published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on halal food supply chains and value chains. A cluster analysis is conducted on the Malaysia and Dubai halal cluster to provide a better understanding of their halal cluster models and sustainability. Findings – Food production and trade has been described as the weak link in the halal value chain. To guarantee availability of and access to halal food, a new paradigm is required in better organising the production and trade of halal food through halal clusters. A halal cluster model is proposed based on five pillars, namely, Muslim consumer, education and research, halal integrity network, halal supply chain and enablers. Research limitations/implications – This conceptual paper proposes a halal cluster model to scale up the production of halal food for the world. However, more empirical research on halal purchasing, halal network development, halal trade and halal parks is needed to support the development of these halal clusters. Practical implications – To better address today’s issues in the halal industries (ingredients, certification, logistics, etc.), there are evident benefits of producing in strong halal clusters, hereby providing easy access to halal ingredients and access to attractive Muslim markets. Originality/value – As halal is going through an evolution, towards a halal supply chain and value chain, new business models are required. It is the first study investigating halal clusters.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1759-0833
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1759-0833
  • 1759-0841
url: Link


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descriptionPurpose – The purpose of this study is to propose a halal cluster concept to better organise production and trade of halal food. Design/methodology/approach – This paper builds further on previous work published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on halal food supply chains and value chains. A cluster analysis is conducted on the Malaysia and Dubai halal cluster to provide a better understanding of their halal cluster models and sustainability. Findings – Food production and trade has been described as the weak link in the halal value chain. To guarantee availability of and access to halal food, a new paradigm is required in better organising the production and trade of halal food through halal clusters. A halal cluster model is proposed based on five pillars, namely, Muslim consumer, education and research, halal integrity network, halal supply chain and enablers. Research limitations/implications – This conceptual paper proposes a halal cluster model to scale up the production of halal food for the world. However, more empirical research on halal purchasing, halal network development, halal trade and halal parks is needed to support the development of these halal clusters. Practical implications – To better address today’s issues in the halal industries (ingredients, certification, logistics, etc.), there are evident benefits of producing in strong halal clusters, hereby providing easy access to halal ingredients and access to attractive Muslim markets. Originality/value – As halal is going through an evolution, towards a halal supply chain and value chain, new business models are required. It is the first study investigating halal clusters.
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subjectCompetition ; Competitive advantage ; Cosmetics ; Food products ; Food security ; Food supply ; Halal food ; Islamic financing ; Logistics ; Manufacturing ; Marketing ; Marketing strategy/methods ; Muslims ; Productivity ; Standards ; Studies ; Value chain
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abstractPurpose – The purpose of this study is to propose a halal cluster concept to better organise production and trade of halal food. Design/methodology/approach – This paper builds further on previous work published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on halal food supply chains and value chains. A cluster analysis is conducted on the Malaysia and Dubai halal cluster to provide a better understanding of their halal cluster models and sustainability. Findings – Food production and trade has been described as the weak link in the halal value chain. To guarantee availability of and access to halal food, a new paradigm is required in better organising the production and trade of halal food through halal clusters. A halal cluster model is proposed based on five pillars, namely, Muslim consumer, education and research, halal integrity network, halal supply chain and enablers. Research limitations/implications – This conceptual paper proposes a halal cluster model to scale up the production of halal food for the world. However, more empirical research on halal purchasing, halal network development, halal trade and halal parks is needed to support the development of these halal clusters. Practical implications – To better address today’s issues in the halal industries (ingredients, certification, logistics, etc.), there are evident benefits of producing in strong halal clusters, hereby providing easy access to halal ingredients and access to attractive Muslim markets. Originality/value – As halal is going through an evolution, towards a halal supply chain and value chain, new business models are required. It is the first study investigating halal clusters.
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