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The Brain's Default Mode Network

The brain's default mode network consists of discrete, bilateral and symmetrical cortical areas, in the medial and lateral parietal, medial prefrontal, and medial and lateral temporal cortices of the human, nonhuman primate, cat, and rodent brains. Its discovery was an unexpected consequence of brai... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of neuroscience 2015-07-08, Vol.38 (1), p.433-447
Main Author: Raichle, Marcus E
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 0147-006X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25938726
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recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1146_annurev_neuro_071013_014030
title: The Brain's Default Mode Network
format: Article
creator:
  • Raichle, Marcus E
subjects:
  • activation
  • Animals
  • attention
  • baseline
  • Brain
  • Brain - physiology
  • functional connectivity
  • Humans
  • intrinsic activity
  • memory
  • Neural circuitry
  • Neural Pathways - physiology
  • Neurosciences
  • Physiological aspects
  • Rest - physiology
  • resting state
  • self
  • Tomography
ispartof: Annual review of neuroscience, 2015-07-08, Vol.38 (1), p.433-447
description: The brain's default mode network consists of discrete, bilateral and symmetrical cortical areas, in the medial and lateral parietal, medial prefrontal, and medial and lateral temporal cortices of the human, nonhuman primate, cat, and rodent brains. Its discovery was an unexpected consequence of brain-imaging studies first performed with positron emission tomography in which various novel, attention-demanding, and non-self-referential tasks were compared with quiet repose either with eyes closed or with simple visual fixation. The default mode network consistently decreases its activity when compared with activity during these relaxed nontask states. The discovery of the default mode network reignited a longstanding interest in the significance of the brain's ongoing or intrinsic activity. Presently, studies of the brain's intrinsic activity, popularly referred to as resting-state studies, have come to play a major role in studies of the human brain in health and disease. The brain's default mode network plays a central role in this work.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0147-006X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0147-006X
  • 1545-4126
url: Link


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descriptionThe brain's default mode network consists of discrete, bilateral and symmetrical cortical areas, in the medial and lateral parietal, medial prefrontal, and medial and lateral temporal cortices of the human, nonhuman primate, cat, and rodent brains. Its discovery was an unexpected consequence of brain-imaging studies first performed with positron emission tomography in which various novel, attention-demanding, and non-self-referential tasks were compared with quiet repose either with eyes closed or with simple visual fixation. The default mode network consistently decreases its activity when compared with activity during these relaxed nontask states. The discovery of the default mode network reignited a longstanding interest in the significance of the brain's ongoing or intrinsic activity. Presently, studies of the brain's intrinsic activity, popularly referred to as resting-state studies, have come to play a major role in studies of the human brain in health and disease. The brain's default mode network plays a central role in this work.
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abstractThe brain's default mode network consists of discrete, bilateral and symmetrical cortical areas, in the medial and lateral parietal, medial prefrontal, and medial and lateral temporal cortices of the human, nonhuman primate, cat, and rodent brains. Its discovery was an unexpected consequence of brain-imaging studies first performed with positron emission tomography in which various novel, attention-demanding, and non-self-referential tasks were compared with quiet repose either with eyes closed or with simple visual fixation. The default mode network consistently decreases its activity when compared with activity during these relaxed nontask states. The discovery of the default mode network reignited a longstanding interest in the significance of the brain's ongoing or intrinsic activity. Presently, studies of the brain's intrinsic activity, popularly referred to as resting-state studies, have come to play a major role in studies of the human brain in health and disease. The brain's default mode network plays a central role in this work.
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