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Income, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and Infant Health

This paper uses quasi-experimental variation from federal tax reform to evaluate the effect of the EITC on infant health outcomes. We find that the EITC reduces the incidence of low birth weight and increases mean birth weight: a $1,000 treatment-on-the-treated leads to a 2 to 3 percent decline in l... Full description

Journal Title: American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 2015-02-01, Vol.7 (1), p.172-211
Main Author: Hoynes, Hilary
Other Authors: Miller, Doug , Simon, David
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: American Economic Association
ID: ISSN: 1945-7731
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recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_1257_pol_20120179
title: Income, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and Infant Health
format: Article
creator:
  • Hoynes, Hilary
  • Miller, Doug
  • Simon, David
subjects:
  • Birth weight
  • Children
  • Earned income tax credit
  • Estimated taxes
  • Income estimates
  • Income taxes
  • Infants
  • Labor supply
  • Low birth weight
  • Single women
ispartof: American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 2015-02-01, Vol.7 (1), p.172-211
description: This paper uses quasi-experimental variation from federal tax reform to evaluate the effect of the EITC on infant health outcomes. We find that the EITC reduces the incidence of low birth weight and increases mean birth weight: a $1,000 treatment-on-the-treated leads to a 2 to 3 percent decline in low birth weight. Our results suggest that the candidate mechanisms include more prenatal care and less negative health behaviors (smoking). Additionally, we find a shift from public to private insurance coverage, and for some a reduction in insurance overall, indicating a potential change in the quality and perhaps quantity of coverage.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1945-7731
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1945-7731
  • 1945-774X
url: Link


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descriptionThis paper uses quasi-experimental variation from federal tax reform to evaluate the effect of the EITC on infant health outcomes. We find that the EITC reduces the incidence of low birth weight and increases mean birth weight: a $1,000 treatment-on-the-treated leads to a 2 to 3 percent decline in low birth weight. Our results suggest that the candidate mechanisms include more prenatal care and less negative health behaviors (smoking). Additionally, we find a shift from public to private insurance coverage, and for some a reduction in insurance overall, indicating a potential change in the quality and perhaps quantity of coverage.
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subjectBirth weight ; Children ; Earned income tax credit ; Estimated taxes ; Income estimates ; Income taxes ; Infants ; Labor supply ; Low birth weight ; Single women
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abstractThis paper uses quasi-experimental variation from federal tax reform to evaluate the effect of the EITC on infant health outcomes. We find that the EITC reduces the incidence of low birth weight and increases mean birth weight: a $1,000 treatment-on-the-treated leads to a 2 to 3 percent decline in low birth weight. Our results suggest that the candidate mechanisms include more prenatal care and less negative health behaviors (smoking). Additionally, we find a shift from public to private insurance coverage, and for some a reduction in insurance overall, indicating a potential change in the quality and perhaps quantity of coverage.
pubAmerican Economic Association
doi10.1257/pol.20120179
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