schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Phylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily

Aquatic species represent fewer than two percent of all flowering plants, and only 18 aquatic genera have acquired true hydrophily (water-pollination) which is associated with an unusually high incidence of unisexual flowers. From the subset of submersed, hydrophilous angiosperms, only 13 genera hav... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic botany 1997-07, Vol.22 (3), p.443-463
Main Author: Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
Other Authors: Cleland, M.A , Waycott, M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: American Society of Plant Taxonomists
ID: ISSN: 0363-6445
Link: https://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=US1997077230
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_crossref_primary_10_2307_2419820
title: Phylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily
format: Article
creator:
  • Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
  • Cleland, M.A
  • Waycott, M
subjects:
  • ANGIOSPERMAS
  • ANGIOSPERME
  • ANGIOSPERMS
  • AQUATIC PLANTS
  • Biological taxonomies
  • CHLOROPLASTE
  • CHLOROPLASTS
  • CLADISTICS
  • CLOROPLASTO
  • Evolution
  • FILOGENIA
  • Fresh water
  • GENE
  • Genera
  • GENES
  • GENETIC ANALYSIS
  • GENETICA
  • GENETICS
  • GENETIQUE
  • Phylogenetics
  • PHYLOGENIE
  • PHYLOGENY
  • PLANTAS ACUATICAS
  • PLANTE AQUATIQUE
  • Plants
  • POLINIZACION
  • POLLINATION
  • POLLINISATION
  • Taxa
ispartof: Systematic botany, 1997-07, Vol.22 (3), p.443-463
description: Aquatic species represent fewer than two percent of all flowering plants, and only 18 aquatic genera have acquired true hydrophily (water-pollination) which is associated with an unusually high incidence of unisexual flowers. From the subset of submersed, hydrophilous angiosperms, only 13 genera have colonized marine habitats. The evolution of hydrophily, unisexuality, and marine habit in angiosperms was explored using estimates of phylogeny obtained by phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast (rbcL) gene sequence data. Despite what might appear to be difficult evolutionary transitions, hydrophiles are highly polyphyletic with independent origins in the monocotyledon subclass Alismatidae in addition to two derivations in the dicotyledon families Ceratophyllaceae and Callitrichaceae. Yet, even in alismatids, hydrophily has evolved many times. Unisexuality has also evolved repeatedly in the Alismatidae, and is ancestral to the evolution of hydrophiles and marine plants in the Hydrocharitaceae. Marine angiosperms (known only from Alismatidae) have evolved in three separate lineages. The multiple origins of hydrophilous, marine plants offer an extraordinary example of convergent evolution in angiosperms
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0363-6445
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0363-6445
  • 1548-2324
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.1943967
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidjstor_cross
recordidTN_cdi_crossref_primary_10_2307_2419820
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
jstor_id2419820
sourcerecordid2419820
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1323t-82470911d4b58389923801b222cc23e2182e418c2fff4b3269bc0a35358223593
addsrcrecordideNp90EFLwzAUB_AgCs4pfgIhB0E9dCYv6Zocx5g6GCjoziVt0y2ja0ZeJvTb27GdRDy9w_vx570_IbecjUCw7Bkk1wrYGRnwVKoEBMhzMmBiLJKxlOkluULcMMb0mPEBqT7WXeNXtrXRlRTjvnIWqWvppHG4NdFVxo7ofD6is2_f7KPzLfU13ZrgWktNu3IedzZskT6iNatgEC0-9YuKrrsq-N3aNd01uahNg_bmNIdk-TL7mr4li_fX-XSySLgAERMFMmOa80oWqRJKaxCK8QIAyhKEBa7ASq5KqOtaFgLGuiiZEalIFYBItRiSh2NuGTxisHW-C64_tcs5yw_l5Kdyepn8kqWL5vBdDMY1f_j7o99g9OGf2Lsjq43P-zYc5stPrnXGsqyH4gfKZXgx
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
display
typearticle
titlePhylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorLes, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.) ; Cleland, M.A ; Waycott, M
creatorcontribLes, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.) ; Cleland, M.A ; Waycott, M
descriptionAquatic species represent fewer than two percent of all flowering plants, and only 18 aquatic genera have acquired true hydrophily (water-pollination) which is associated with an unusually high incidence of unisexual flowers. From the subset of submersed, hydrophilous angiosperms, only 13 genera have colonized marine habitats. The evolution of hydrophily, unisexuality, and marine habit in angiosperms was explored using estimates of phylogeny obtained by phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast (rbcL) gene sequence data. Despite what might appear to be difficult evolutionary transitions, hydrophiles are highly polyphyletic with independent origins in the monocotyledon subclass Alismatidae in addition to two derivations in the dicotyledon families Ceratophyllaceae and Callitrichaceae. Yet, even in alismatids, hydrophily has evolved many times. Unisexuality has also evolved repeatedly in the Alismatidae, and is ancestral to the evolution of hydrophiles and marine plants in the Hydrocharitaceae. Marine angiosperms (known only from Alismatidae) have evolved in three separate lineages. The multiple origins of hydrophilous, marine plants offer an extraordinary example of convergent evolution in angiosperms
identifier
0ISSN: 0363-6445
1EISSN: 1548-2324
2DOI: 10.2307/2419820
languageeng
publisherAmerican Society of Plant Taxonomists
subjectANGIOSPERMAS ; ANGIOSPERME ; ANGIOSPERMS ; AQUATIC PLANTS ; Biological taxonomies ; CHLOROPLASTE ; CHLOROPLASTS ; CLADISTICS ; CLOROPLASTO ; Evolution ; FILOGENIA ; Fresh water ; GENE ; Genera ; GENES ; GENETIC ANALYSIS ; GENETICA ; GENETICS ; GENETIQUE ; Phylogenetics ; PHYLOGENIE ; PHYLOGENY ; PLANTAS ACUATICAS ; PLANTE AQUATIQUE ; Plants ; POLINIZACION ; POLLINATION ; POLLINISATION ; Taxa
ispartofSystematic botany, 1997-07, Vol.22 (3), p.443-463
rightsCopyright 1997 American Society of Plant Taxonomists
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1323t-82470911d4b58389923801b222cc23e2182e418c2fff4b3269bc0a35358223593
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=US1997077230$$DView record in FAO AGRIS
search
creatorcontrib
0Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
1Cleland, M.A
2Waycott, M
title
0Phylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily
1Systematic botany
descriptionAquatic species represent fewer than two percent of all flowering plants, and only 18 aquatic genera have acquired true hydrophily (water-pollination) which is associated with an unusually high incidence of unisexual flowers. From the subset of submersed, hydrophilous angiosperms, only 13 genera have colonized marine habitats. The evolution of hydrophily, unisexuality, and marine habit in angiosperms was explored using estimates of phylogeny obtained by phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast (rbcL) gene sequence data. Despite what might appear to be difficult evolutionary transitions, hydrophiles are highly polyphyletic with independent origins in the monocotyledon subclass Alismatidae in addition to two derivations in the dicotyledon families Ceratophyllaceae and Callitrichaceae. Yet, even in alismatids, hydrophily has evolved many times. Unisexuality has also evolved repeatedly in the Alismatidae, and is ancestral to the evolution of hydrophiles and marine plants in the Hydrocharitaceae. Marine angiosperms (known only from Alismatidae) have evolved in three separate lineages. The multiple origins of hydrophilous, marine plants offer an extraordinary example of convergent evolution in angiosperms
subject
0ANGIOSPERMAS
1ANGIOSPERME
2ANGIOSPERMS
3AQUATIC PLANTS
4Biological taxonomies
5CHLOROPLASTE
6CHLOROPLASTS
7CLADISTICS
8CLOROPLASTO
9Evolution
10FILOGENIA
11Fresh water
12GENE
13Genera
14GENES
15GENETIC ANALYSIS
16GENETICA
17GENETICS
18GENETIQUE
19Phylogenetics
20PHYLOGENIE
21PHYLOGENY
22PLANTAS ACUATICAS
23PLANTE AQUATIQUE
24Plants
25POLINIZACION
26POLLINATION
27POLLINISATION
28Taxa
issn
00363-6445
11548-2324
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate1997
recordtypearticle
recordideNp90EFLwzAUB_AgCs4pfgIhB0E9dCYv6Zocx5g6GCjoziVt0y2ja0ZeJvTb27GdRDy9w_vx570_IbecjUCw7Bkk1wrYGRnwVKoEBMhzMmBiLJKxlOkluULcMMb0mPEBqT7WXeNXtrXRlRTjvnIWqWvppHG4NdFVxo7ofD6is2_f7KPzLfU13ZrgWktNu3IedzZskT6iNatgEC0-9YuKrrsq-N3aNd01uahNg_bmNIdk-TL7mr4li_fX-XSySLgAERMFMmOa80oWqRJKaxCK8QIAyhKEBa7ASq5KqOtaFgLGuiiZEalIFYBItRiSh2NuGTxisHW-C64_tcs5yw_l5Kdyepn8kqWL5vBdDMY1f_j7o99g9OGf2Lsjq43P-zYc5stPrnXGsqyH4gfKZXgx
startdate199707
enddate199707
creator
0Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
1Cleland, M.A
2Waycott, M
generalAmerican Society of Plant Taxonomists
scope
0FBQ
1AAYXX
2CITATION
sort
creationdate199707
titlePhylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily
authorLes, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.) ; Cleland, M.A ; Waycott, M
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1323t-82470911d4b58389923801b222cc23e2182e418c2fff4b3269bc0a35358223593
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate1997
topic
0ANGIOSPERMAS
1ANGIOSPERME
2ANGIOSPERMS
3AQUATIC PLANTS
4Biological taxonomies
5CHLOROPLASTE
6CHLOROPLASTS
7CLADISTICS
8CLOROPLASTO
9Evolution
10FILOGENIA
11Fresh water
12GENE
13Genera
14GENES
15GENETIC ANALYSIS
16GENETICA
17GENETICS
18GENETIQUE
19Phylogenetics
20PHYLOGENIE
21PHYLOGENY
22PLANTAS ACUATICAS
23PLANTE AQUATIQUE
24Plants
25POLINIZACION
26POLLINATION
27POLLINISATION
28Taxa
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
1Cleland, M.A
2Waycott, M
collection
0AGRIS
1CrossRef
jtitleSystematic botany
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Les, D.H. (University of Connecticut, Storrs.)
1Cleland, M.A
2Waycott, M
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitlePhylogenetic studies in Alismatidae. II. Evolution of marine angiosperms (seagrasses) and hydrophily
jtitleSystematic botany
date1997-07
risdate1997
volume22
issue3
spage443
epage463
pages443-463
issn0363-6445
eissn1548-2324
notes
0F30
11997077230
2F70
3M01
abstractAquatic species represent fewer than two percent of all flowering plants, and only 18 aquatic genera have acquired true hydrophily (water-pollination) which is associated with an unusually high incidence of unisexual flowers. From the subset of submersed, hydrophilous angiosperms, only 13 genera have colonized marine habitats. The evolution of hydrophily, unisexuality, and marine habit in angiosperms was explored using estimates of phylogeny obtained by phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast (rbcL) gene sequence data. Despite what might appear to be difficult evolutionary transitions, hydrophiles are highly polyphyletic with independent origins in the monocotyledon subclass Alismatidae in addition to two derivations in the dicotyledon families Ceratophyllaceae and Callitrichaceae. Yet, even in alismatids, hydrophily has evolved many times. Unisexuality has also evolved repeatedly in the Alismatidae, and is ancestral to the evolution of hydrophiles and marine plants in the Hydrocharitaceae. Marine angiosperms (known only from Alismatidae) have evolved in three separate lineages. The multiple origins of hydrophilous, marine plants offer an extraordinary example of convergent evolution in angiosperms
pubAmerican Society of Plant Taxonomists
doi10.2307/2419820