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Access With Education Improves Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Preschool Children

AbstractObjectiveTo compare effects of interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children. DesignPre-post comparison and intervention study with randomly grouped classrooms. SettingHead Start classrooms. ParticipantsTwo hundred nine Head Start children. InterventionsTreatm... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of nutrition education and behavior 2019, Vol.52 (2), p.145-151
Main Author: Smith, Elizabeth, PhD, RD, LDN
Other Authors: Sutarso, Toto, PhD , Kaye, Gail L., PhD, RD, LD, LPCC
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1499-4046
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31494058
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recordid: cdi_elsevier_clinicalkeyesjournals_1_s2_0_S1499404619309583
title: Access With Education Improves Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Preschool Children
format: Article
creator:
  • Smith, Elizabeth, PhD, RD, LDN
  • Sutarso, Toto, PhD
  • Kaye, Gail L., PhD, RD, LD, LPCC
subjects:
  • carotenoids
  • Carotenoids - analysis
  • Child, Preschool
  • education
  • Female
  • food access
  • Fruit
  • fruits and vegetables
  • Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Head Start children
  • Health Behavior - physiology
  • Health Education - methods
  • Humans
  • Internal Medicine
  • Male
  • Random Allocation
  • Skin - chemistry
  • Spectrum Analysis, Raman
  • Vegetables
ispartof: Journal of nutrition education and behavior, 2019, Vol.52 (2), p.145-151
description: AbstractObjectiveTo compare effects of interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children. DesignPre-post comparison and intervention study with randomly grouped classrooms. SettingHead Start classrooms. ParticipantsTwo hundred nine Head Start children. InterventionsTreatment A (n = 61) and treatment B (n = 82) children received high-carotenoid FVs for 8 weeks. Treatment B children also received weekly FV education, and their caregivers received FV information and recipes. The comparison group (n = 66) received neither FVs nor education. Main Outcome MeasureCarotenoid values in Raman units. AnalysisMultilevel mixed models, ANCOVA, and post hoc analysis were used. ResultsMultilevel mixed models with the group as fixed effect and classrooms within group as a random effect; ANCOVA showed that the only significant variable affecting the score was the group main effect. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.037; the Raman unit scores of treatment B were significantly higher than those of treatment A ( P = .02) or comparison group ( P < .001). However, there was no significant difference between treatment A and comparison ( P = .10; Cohen D = .71). Conclusions and ImplicationsThe results suggested that providing education where FVs are offered may help increase consumption. Measurement of carotenoids in family members who received FVs plus education, as well as replication of this model in different locations and ages of children should be investigated in future research.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1499-4046
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1499-4046
  • 1878-2620
url: Link


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descriptionAbstractObjectiveTo compare effects of interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children. DesignPre-post comparison and intervention study with randomly grouped classrooms. SettingHead Start classrooms. ParticipantsTwo hundred nine Head Start children. InterventionsTreatment A (n = 61) and treatment B (n = 82) children received high-carotenoid FVs for 8 weeks. Treatment B children also received weekly FV education, and their caregivers received FV information and recipes. The comparison group (n = 66) received neither FVs nor education. Main Outcome MeasureCarotenoid values in Raman units. AnalysisMultilevel mixed models, ANCOVA, and post hoc analysis were used. ResultsMultilevel mixed models with the group as fixed effect and classrooms within group as a random effect; ANCOVA showed that the only significant variable affecting the score was the group main effect. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.037; the Raman unit scores of treatment B were significantly higher than those of treatment A ( P = .02) or comparison group ( P < .001). However, there was no significant difference between treatment A and comparison ( P = .10; Cohen D = .71). Conclusions and ImplicationsThe results suggested that providing education where FVs are offered may help increase consumption. Measurement of carotenoids in family members who received FVs plus education, as well as replication of this model in different locations and ages of children should be investigated in future research.
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subjectcarotenoids ; Carotenoids - analysis ; Child, Preschool ; education ; Female ; food access ; Fruit ; fruits and vegetables ; Gastroenterology and Hepatology ; Head Start children ; Health Behavior - physiology ; Health Education - methods ; Humans ; Internal Medicine ; Male ; Random Allocation ; Skin - chemistry ; Spectrum Analysis, Raman ; Vegetables
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descriptionAbstractObjectiveTo compare effects of interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children. DesignPre-post comparison and intervention study with randomly grouped classrooms. SettingHead Start classrooms. ParticipantsTwo hundred nine Head Start children. InterventionsTreatment A (n = 61) and treatment B (n = 82) children received high-carotenoid FVs for 8 weeks. Treatment B children also received weekly FV education, and their caregivers received FV information and recipes. The comparison group (n = 66) received neither FVs nor education. Main Outcome MeasureCarotenoid values in Raman units. AnalysisMultilevel mixed models, ANCOVA, and post hoc analysis were used. ResultsMultilevel mixed models with the group as fixed effect and classrooms within group as a random effect; ANCOVA showed that the only significant variable affecting the score was the group main effect. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.037; the Raman unit scores of treatment B were significantly higher than those of treatment A ( P = .02) or comparison group ( P < .001). However, there was no significant difference between treatment A and comparison ( P = .10; Cohen D = .71). Conclusions and ImplicationsThe results suggested that providing education where FVs are offered may help increase consumption. Measurement of carotenoids in family members who received FVs plus education, as well as replication of this model in different locations and ages of children should be investigated in future research.
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abstractAbstractObjectiveTo compare effects of interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children. DesignPre-post comparison and intervention study with randomly grouped classrooms. SettingHead Start classrooms. ParticipantsTwo hundred nine Head Start children. InterventionsTreatment A (n = 61) and treatment B (n = 82) children received high-carotenoid FVs for 8 weeks. Treatment B children also received weekly FV education, and their caregivers received FV information and recipes. The comparison group (n = 66) received neither FVs nor education. Main Outcome MeasureCarotenoid values in Raman units. AnalysisMultilevel mixed models, ANCOVA, and post hoc analysis were used. ResultsMultilevel mixed models with the group as fixed effect and classrooms within group as a random effect; ANCOVA showed that the only significant variable affecting the score was the group main effect. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.037; the Raman unit scores of treatment B were significantly higher than those of treatment A ( P = .02) or comparison group ( P < .001). However, there was no significant difference between treatment A and comparison ( P = .10; Cohen D = .71). Conclusions and ImplicationsThe results suggested that providing education where FVs are offered may help increase consumption. Measurement of carotenoids in family members who received FVs plus education, as well as replication of this model in different locations and ages of children should be investigated in future research.
copUnited States
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pmid31494058
doi10.1016/j.jneb.2019.07.016