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Environmental behavior and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to algae, plants, and fungi

Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for... Full description

Journal Title: Ecotoxicology (London) 2008, Vol.17 (5), p.372-386
Main Author: Navarro, Enrique
Other Authors: Baun, Anders , Behra, Renata , Hartmann, Nanna B , Filser, Juliane , Miao, Ai-Jun , Quigg, Antonietta , Santschi, Peter H , Sigg, Laura
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston: Boston : Springer US
ID: ISSN: 0963-9292
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A179460231
title: Environmental behavior and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to algae, plants, and fungi
format: Article
creator:
  • Navarro, Enrique
  • Baun, Anders
  • Behra, Renata
  • Hartmann, Nanna B
  • Filser, Juliane
  • Miao, Ai-Jun
  • Quigg, Antonietta
  • Santschi, Peter H
  • Sigg, Laura
subjects:
  • Article
  • Carbon black
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Ecology
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Environment
  • Environmental engineering
  • Environmental Management
  • Environmental Pollutants - chemistry
  • Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
  • Eukaryota - drug effects
  • Fullerenes
  • Fungi - drug effects
  • general
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanoparticles - chemistry
  • Nanoparticles - toxicity
  • Nanotechnology
  • Organic matter
  • Plants - drug effects
  • Silver nanoparticles
  • TiO2
  • Toxicity
ispartof: Ecotoxicology (London), 2008, Vol.17 (5), p.372-386
description: Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0963-9292
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0963-9292
  • 1573-3017
url: Link


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descriptionDevelopments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated.
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subjectArticle ; Carbon black ; Carbon nanotubes ; Earth and Environmental Science ; Ecology ; Ecotoxicology ; Environment ; Environmental engineering ; Environmental Management ; Environmental Pollutants - chemistry ; Environmental Pollutants - toxicity ; Eukaryota - drug effects ; Fullerenes ; Fungi - drug effects ; general ; Nanoparticles ; Nanoparticles - chemistry ; Nanoparticles - toxicity ; Nanotechnology ; Organic matter ; Plants - drug effects ; Silver nanoparticles ; TiO2 ; Toxicity
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descriptionDevelopments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated.
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abstractDevelopments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated.
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