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Voices from within: gut microbes and the CNS

Recent advances in research have greatly increased our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota. Bacterial colonization of the intestine is critical to the normal development of many aspects of physiology such as the immune and endocrine systems. It is emerging that the influence of the... Full description

Journal Title: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS 2012-05-27, Vol.70 (1), p.55-69
Main Author: Forsythe, Paul
Other Authors: Kunze, Wolfgang A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Basel: SP Birkhäuser Verlag Basel
ID: ISSN: 1420-682X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22638926
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recordid: cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A321706952
title: Voices from within: gut microbes and the CNS
format: Article
creator:
  • Forsythe, Paul
  • Kunze, Wolfgang A
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Bacteria
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biomedicine
  • Brain
  • Brain - metabolism
  • Brain - physiology
  • Cell Biology
  • Central Nervous System - growth & development
  • Central Nervous System - microbiology
  • Enteric Nervous System - microbiology
  • general
  • Germ-Free Life
  • Humans
  • Inflammation - microbiology
  • Intestines - microbiology
  • Life Sciences
  • Metagenome
  • Mice
  • Microorganisms
  • Models, Biological
  • Nervous system
  • Neuropeptides - metabolism
  • Neuropeptides - physiology
  • Probiotics
  • Review
  • Signal Transduction
  • Stress, Physiological
  • Vagus Nerve - metabolism
  • Vagus Nerve - physiology
  • Wildlife conservation
ispartof: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS, 2012-05-27, Vol.70 (1), p.55-69
description: Recent advances in research have greatly increased our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota. Bacterial colonization of the intestine is critical to the normal development of many aspects of physiology such as the immune and endocrine systems. It is emerging that the influence of the gut microbiota also extends to modulation of host neural development. Furthermore, the overall balance in composition of the microbiota, together with the influence of pivotal species that induce specific responses, can modulate adult neural function, peripherally and centrally. Effects of commensal gut bacteria in adult animals include protection from the central effects of infection and inflammation as well as modulation of normal behavioral responses. There is now robust evidence that gut bacteria influence the enteric nervous system, an effect that may contribute to afferent signaling to the brain. The vagus nerve has also emerged as an important means of communicating signals from gut bacteria to the CNS. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbiome–gut–brain communication will provide us with new insight into the symbiotic relationship between gut microbiota and their mammalian hosts and help us identify the potential for microbial-based therapeutic strategies to aid in the treatment of mood disorders.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1420-682X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1420-682X
  • 1420-9071
url: Link


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descriptionRecent advances in research have greatly increased our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota. Bacterial colonization of the intestine is critical to the normal development of many aspects of physiology such as the immune and endocrine systems. It is emerging that the influence of the gut microbiota also extends to modulation of host neural development. Furthermore, the overall balance in composition of the microbiota, together with the influence of pivotal species that induce specific responses, can modulate adult neural function, peripherally and centrally. Effects of commensal gut bacteria in adult animals include protection from the central effects of infection and inflammation as well as modulation of normal behavioral responses. There is now robust evidence that gut bacteria influence the enteric nervous system, an effect that may contribute to afferent signaling to the brain. The vagus nerve has also emerged as an important means of communicating signals from gut bacteria to the CNS. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbiome–gut–brain communication will provide us with new insight into the symbiotic relationship between gut microbiota and their mammalian hosts and help us identify the potential for microbial-based therapeutic strategies to aid in the treatment of mood disorders.
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subjectAnimals ; Bacteria ; Biochemistry ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Biomedicine ; Brain ; Brain - metabolism ; Brain - physiology ; Cell Biology ; Central Nervous System - growth & development ; Central Nervous System - microbiology ; Enteric Nervous System - microbiology ; general ; Germ-Free Life ; Humans ; Inflammation - microbiology ; Intestines - microbiology ; Life Sciences ; Metagenome ; Mice ; Microorganisms ; Models, Biological ; Nervous system ; Neuropeptides - metabolism ; Neuropeptides - physiology ; Probiotics ; Review ; Signal Transduction ; Stress, Physiological ; Vagus Nerve - metabolism ; Vagus Nerve - physiology ; Wildlife conservation
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descriptionRecent advances in research have greatly increased our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota. Bacterial colonization of the intestine is critical to the normal development of many aspects of physiology such as the immune and endocrine systems. It is emerging that the influence of the gut microbiota also extends to modulation of host neural development. Furthermore, the overall balance in composition of the microbiota, together with the influence of pivotal species that induce specific responses, can modulate adult neural function, peripherally and centrally. Effects of commensal gut bacteria in adult animals include protection from the central effects of infection and inflammation as well as modulation of normal behavioral responses. There is now robust evidence that gut bacteria influence the enteric nervous system, an effect that may contribute to afferent signaling to the brain. The vagus nerve has also emerged as an important means of communicating signals from gut bacteria to the CNS. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbiome–gut–brain communication will provide us with new insight into the symbiotic relationship between gut microbiota and their mammalian hosts and help us identify the potential for microbial-based therapeutic strategies to aid in the treatment of mood disorders.
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abstractRecent advances in research have greatly increased our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota. Bacterial colonization of the intestine is critical to the normal development of many aspects of physiology such as the immune and endocrine systems. It is emerging that the influence of the gut microbiota also extends to modulation of host neural development. Furthermore, the overall balance in composition of the microbiota, together with the influence of pivotal species that induce specific responses, can modulate adult neural function, peripherally and centrally. Effects of commensal gut bacteria in adult animals include protection from the central effects of infection and inflammation as well as modulation of normal behavioral responses. There is now robust evidence that gut bacteria influence the enteric nervous system, an effect that may contribute to afferent signaling to the brain. The vagus nerve has also emerged as an important means of communicating signals from gut bacteria to the CNS. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbiome–gut–brain communication will provide us with new insight into the symbiotic relationship between gut microbiota and their mammalian hosts and help us identify the potential for microbial-based therapeutic strategies to aid in the treatment of mood disorders.
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pubSP Birkhäuser Verlag Basel
pmid22638926
doi10.1007/s00018-012-1028-z