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SPECIES-LEVEL PARAPHYLY AND POLYPHYLY: Frequency, Causes, and Consequences, with Insights from Animal Mitochondrial DNA

Many uses of gene trees implicitly assume that nominal species are monophyletic in their alleles at the study locus. However, in well-sampled gene trees, certain alleles in one species may appear more closely related to alleles from different species than to other conspecific alleles. Such deviation... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of ecology evolution, and systematics, 2003, Vol.34 (1), p.397-423
Main Author: Funk, Daniel J
Other Authors: Omland, Kevin E
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
DNA
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Palo Alto, CA 94303-0139: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 1543-592X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=15366632
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recordid: cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A323117484
title: SPECIES-LEVEL PARAPHYLY AND POLYPHYLY: Frequency, Causes, and Consequences, with Insights from Animal Mitochondrial DNA
format: Article
creator:
  • Funk, Daniel J
  • Omland, Kevin E
subjects:
  • Alleles
  • Animals
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological evolution
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Deoxyribonucleic acid
  • DNA
  • Ecology
  • Evolution
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • gene trees
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic variation
  • Genetics of eukaryotes. Biological and molecular evolution
  • introgression
  • lineage sorting
  • Mitochondrial DNA
  • paraphyletic species
  • Paraphyly
  • Phylogenetics
  • Polyphyly
  • Speciation
  • species concepts
  • Taxa
ispartof: Annual review of ecology, evolution, and systematics, 2003, Vol.34 (1), p.397-423
description: Many uses of gene trees implicitly assume that nominal species are monophyletic in their alleles at the study locus. However, in well-sampled gene trees, certain alleles in one species may appear more closely related to alleles from different species than to other conspecific alleles. Such deviations from species-level monophyly have a variety of causes and may lead to erroneous evolutionary interpretations if undetected. The present paper describes the causes and consequences of these paraphyletic and polyphyletic patterns. It also provides a detailed literature survey of mitochondrial DNA studies on low-level animal phylogeny and phylogeography, results from which reveal the frequency of nonmonophyly and patterns of interpretation and sampling. This survey detected species-level paraphyly or polyphyly in 23% of 2319 assayed species, demonstrating this phenomenon to be statistically supported, taxonomically widespread, and far more common than generally recognized. Our findings call for increased attention to sampling and the interpretation of paraphyletic and polyphyletic gene trees in studies of closely related taxa by systematists and population geneticists alike and thus for a new tradition of "congeneric phylogeography."
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1543-592X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1543-592X
  • 1545-2069
url: Link


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titleSPECIES-LEVEL PARAPHYLY AND POLYPHYLY: Frequency, Causes, and Consequences, with Insights from Animal Mitochondrial DNA
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descriptionMany uses of gene trees implicitly assume that nominal species are monophyletic in their alleles at the study locus. However, in well-sampled gene trees, certain alleles in one species may appear more closely related to alleles from different species than to other conspecific alleles. Such deviations from species-level monophyly have a variety of causes and may lead to erroneous evolutionary interpretations if undetected. The present paper describes the causes and consequences of these paraphyletic and polyphyletic patterns. It also provides a detailed literature survey of mitochondrial DNA studies on low-level animal phylogeny and phylogeography, results from which reveal the frequency of nonmonophyly and patterns of interpretation and sampling. This survey detected species-level paraphyly or polyphyly in 23% of 2319 assayed species, demonstrating this phenomenon to be statistically supported, taxonomically widespread, and far more common than generally recognized. Our findings call for increased attention to sampling and the interpretation of paraphyletic and polyphyletic gene trees in studies of closely related taxa by systematists and population geneticists alike and thus for a new tradition of "congeneric phylogeography."
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subjectAlleles ; Animals ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological evolution ; Biological taxonomies ; Deoxyribonucleic acid ; DNA ; Ecology ; Evolution ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; gene trees ; Genetic research ; Genetic variation ; Genetics of eukaryotes. Biological and molecular evolution ; introgression ; lineage sorting ; Mitochondrial DNA ; paraphyletic species ; Paraphyly ; Phylogenetics ; Polyphyly ; Speciation ; species concepts ; Taxa
ispartofAnnual review of ecology, evolution, and systematics, 2003, Vol.34 (1), p.397-423
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abstractMany uses of gene trees implicitly assume that nominal species are monophyletic in their alleles at the study locus. However, in well-sampled gene trees, certain alleles in one species may appear more closely related to alleles from different species than to other conspecific alleles. Such deviations from species-level monophyly have a variety of causes and may lead to erroneous evolutionary interpretations if undetected. The present paper describes the causes and consequences of these paraphyletic and polyphyletic patterns. It also provides a detailed literature survey of mitochondrial DNA studies on low-level animal phylogeny and phylogeography, results from which reveal the frequency of nonmonophyly and patterns of interpretation and sampling. This survey detected species-level paraphyly or polyphyly in 23% of 2319 assayed species, demonstrating this phenomenon to be statistically supported, taxonomically widespread, and far more common than generally recognized. Our findings call for increased attention to sampling and the interpretation of paraphyletic and polyphyletic gene trees in studies of closely related taxa by systematists and population geneticists alike and thus for a new tradition of "congeneric phylogeography."
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