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Discrimination of Arabic-Named Applicants in the Netherlands: An Internet-Based Field Experiment Examining Different Phases in Online Recruitment Procedures

This study examines discrimination of Arabic-named applicants in online recruitment procedures in the Netherlands. We develop and implement a new field experiment approach, posting fictitious résumés (n = 636) on two online résumé databases. Two phases of recruitment procedures are examined: employe... Full description

Journal Title: Social forces 2014, Vol.92 (3), p.957-982
Main Author: Blommaert, E.C.C.A
Other Authors: Coenders, M.T.A , Tubergen, F.A. van
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Sex
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 0037-7732
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title: Discrimination of Arabic-Named Applicants in the Netherlands: An Internet-Based Field Experiment Examining Different Phases in Online Recruitment Procedures
format: Article
creator:
  • Blommaert, E.C.C.A
  • Coenders, M.T.A
  • Tubergen, F.A. van
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • Arabic
  • Arabic Language
  • Candidates
  • Databases
  • Discrimination
  • Discrimination in employment
  • Electronic information resources
  • Employees
  • Employers
  • Employment
  • Employment discrimination
  • Employment services
  • Experiments
  • Females
  • Field experiments
  • Gender discrimination
  • Internet
  • Labor markets
  • Males
  • Names, Personal
  • Netherlands
  • Online employment search service
  • Online employment search services
  • Online recruitment
  • Online services
  • Racial differentiation
  • Recruiting
  • Recruitment
  • Resumes
  • Sex
  • Social aspects
  • Vocational education
  • Websites
  • WORK
ispartof: Social forces, 2014, Vol.92 (3), p.957-982
description: This study examines discrimination of Arabic-named applicants in online recruitment procedures in the Netherlands. We develop and implement a new field experiment approach, posting fictitious résumés (n = 636) on two online résumé databases. Two phases of recruitment procedures are examined: employers' decisions to (1) view applicants' complete résumés after seeing short profiles and (2) contact applicants. The experiment covers both male and female applicants, three occupational levels, five sectors, and ten geographical regions, and consists of two waves. Results provide strong evidence of discrimination in the first phase (views). Résumés of Arabic-named applicants were requested less often, regardless of their education, gender, age, region, or sector, and for both websites and waves. Controlling for the number of times candidates' full résumés were viewed, there is less evidence of discrimination in the second phase (reactions). Yet, after two phases, the cumulative ethnic difference is considerable: Dutch-named applicants are 60 percent more likely to receive a positive reaction than Arabic-named applicants. We conclude that ethnic disparities in outcomes of recruitment procedures are substantial and arise already in the very first phase of the selection process. Hence, employers often do not even getto see Arabic-named applicants' résumés. Finally, discrimination is stronger in wave two, when the total number of views of résumés was lower, indicating lower labor demand.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0037-7732
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0037-7732
  • 1534-7605
url: Link


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descriptionThis study examines discrimination of Arabic-named applicants in online recruitment procedures in the Netherlands. We develop and implement a new field experiment approach, posting fictitious résumés (n = 636) on two online résumé databases. Two phases of recruitment procedures are examined: employers' decisions to (1) view applicants' complete résumés after seeing short profiles and (2) contact applicants. The experiment covers both male and female applicants, three occupational levels, five sectors, and ten geographical regions, and consists of two waves. Results provide strong evidence of discrimination in the first phase (views). Résumés of Arabic-named applicants were requested less often, regardless of their education, gender, age, region, or sector, and for both websites and waves. Controlling for the number of times candidates' full résumés were viewed, there is less evidence of discrimination in the second phase (reactions). Yet, after two phases, the cumulative ethnic difference is considerable: Dutch-named applicants are 60 percent more likely to receive a positive reaction than Arabic-named applicants. We conclude that ethnic disparities in outcomes of recruitment procedures are substantial and arise already in the very first phase of the selection process. Hence, employers often do not even getto see Arabic-named applicants' résumés. Finally, discrimination is stronger in wave two, when the total number of views of résumés was lower, indicating lower labor demand.
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subjectAnalysis ; Arabic ; Arabic Language ; Candidates ; Databases ; Discrimination ; Discrimination in employment ; Electronic information resources ; Employees ; Employers ; Employment ; Employment discrimination ; Employment services ; Experiments ; Females ; Field experiments ; Gender discrimination ; Internet ; Labor markets ; Males ; Names, Personal ; Netherlands ; Online employment search service ; Online employment search services ; Online recruitment ; Online services ; Racial differentiation ; Recruiting ; Recruitment ; Resumes ; Sex ; Social aspects ; Vocational education ; Websites ; WORK
ispartofSocial forces, 2014, Vol.92 (3), p.957-982
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descriptionThis study examines discrimination of Arabic-named applicants in online recruitment procedures in the Netherlands. We develop and implement a new field experiment approach, posting fictitious résumés (n = 636) on two online résumé databases. Two phases of recruitment procedures are examined: employers' decisions to (1) view applicants' complete résumés after seeing short profiles and (2) contact applicants. The experiment covers both male and female applicants, three occupational levels, five sectors, and ten geographical regions, and consists of two waves. Results provide strong evidence of discrimination in the first phase (views). Résumés of Arabic-named applicants were requested less often, regardless of their education, gender, age, region, or sector, and for both websites and waves. Controlling for the number of times candidates' full résumés were viewed, there is less evidence of discrimination in the second phase (reactions). Yet, after two phases, the cumulative ethnic difference is considerable: Dutch-named applicants are 60 percent more likely to receive a positive reaction than Arabic-named applicants. We conclude that ethnic disparities in outcomes of recruitment procedures are substantial and arise already in the very first phase of the selection process. Hence, employers often do not even getto see Arabic-named applicants' résumés. Finally, discrimination is stronger in wave two, when the total number of views of résumés was lower, indicating lower labor demand.
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1Arabic
2Arabic Language
3Candidates
4Databases
5Discrimination
6Discrimination in employment
7Electronic information resources
8Employees
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10Employment
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13Experiments
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16Gender discrimination
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20Names, Personal
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23Online employment search services
24Online recruitment
25Online services
26Racial differentiation
27Recruiting
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29Resumes
30Sex
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34WORK
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abstractThis study examines discrimination of Arabic-named applicants in online recruitment procedures in the Netherlands. We develop and implement a new field experiment approach, posting fictitious résumés (n = 636) on two online résumé databases. Two phases of recruitment procedures are examined: employers' decisions to (1) view applicants' complete résumés after seeing short profiles and (2) contact applicants. The experiment covers both male and female applicants, three occupational levels, five sectors, and ten geographical regions, and consists of two waves. Results provide strong evidence of discrimination in the first phase (views). Résumés of Arabic-named applicants were requested less often, regardless of their education, gender, age, region, or sector, and for both websites and waves. Controlling for the number of times candidates' full résumés were viewed, there is less evidence of discrimination in the second phase (reactions). Yet, after two phases, the cumulative ethnic difference is considerable: Dutch-named applicants are 60 percent more likely to receive a positive reaction than Arabic-named applicants. We conclude that ethnic disparities in outcomes of recruitment procedures are substantial and arise already in the very first phase of the selection process. Hence, employers often do not even getto see Arabic-named applicants' résumés. Finally, discrimination is stronger in wave two, when the total number of views of résumés was lower, indicating lower labor demand.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/sf/sot124
tpages26