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The Role of Health Behaviours Across the Life Course in the Socioeconomic Patterning of All-Cause Mortality: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Prospective Cohort Study

Background Socioeconomic differentials in mortality are increasing in many industrialised countries. Purpose This study aims to examine the role of behaviours (smoking, alcohol, exercise, and diet) in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality and whether this varies over the life course, b... Full description

Journal Title: Annals of Behavioral Medicine 2013-09-26, Vol.47 (2), p.148-157
Main Author: Whitley, Elise
Other Authors: Batty, G. David , Hunt, Kate , Popham, Frank , Benzeval, Michaela
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston: Springer US
ID: ISSN: 0883-6612
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24072618
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recordid: cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A362696338
title: The Role of Health Behaviours Across the Life Course in the Socioeconomic Patterning of All-Cause Mortality: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Prospective Cohort Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Whitley, Elise
  • Batty, G. David
  • Hunt, Kate
  • Popham, Frank
  • Benzeval, Michaela
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Alcohol Drinking - mortality
  • Analysis
  • Cohort
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diet - statistics & numerical data
  • Exercise
  • Family Medicine
  • Female
  • general
  • General Practice
  • Health aspects
  • Health Behavior
  • Health behaviours
  • Health Psychology
  • Humans
  • Life cycles
  • Male
  • Medicine
  • Medicine & Public Health
  • Mental health
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality
  • Original
  • Original Article
  • Prospective Studies
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)
  • Public health
  • Risk Factors
  • Scotland - epidemiology
  • Smoking - mortality
  • Social Class
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Study and teaching
  • Survival Rate
ispartof: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2013-09-26, Vol.47 (2), p.148-157
description: Background Socioeconomic differentials in mortality are increasing in many industrialised countries. Purpose This study aims to examine the role of behaviours (smoking, alcohol, exercise, and diet) in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality and whether this varies over the life course, between cohorts and by gender. Methods Analysis of two representative population cohorts of men and women, born in the 1950s and 1930s, were performed. Health behaviours were assessed on five occasions over 20 years. Results Health behaviours explained a substantial part of the socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Cumulative behaviours and those that were more strongly associated with socioeconomic status had the greatest impact. For example, in the 1950s cohort, the age-sex adjusted hazard ratio comparing respondents with manual versus non-manual occupational status was 1.80 (1.25, 2.58); adjustment for cumulative smoking over 20 years attenuated the association by 49 %, diet by 43 %, drinking by 13 % and inactivity by only 1%. Conclusions Health behaviours have an important role in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0883-6612
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0883-6612
  • 1532-4796
url: Link


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titleThe Role of Health Behaviours Across the Life Course in the Socioeconomic Patterning of All-Cause Mortality: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Prospective Cohort Study
creatorWhitley, Elise ; Batty, G. David ; Hunt, Kate ; Popham, Frank ; Benzeval, Michaela
creatorcontribWhitley, Elise ; Batty, G. David ; Hunt, Kate ; Popham, Frank ; Benzeval, Michaela
descriptionBackground Socioeconomic differentials in mortality are increasing in many industrialised countries. Purpose This study aims to examine the role of behaviours (smoking, alcohol, exercise, and diet) in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality and whether this varies over the life course, between cohorts and by gender. Methods Analysis of two representative population cohorts of men and women, born in the 1950s and 1930s, were performed. Health behaviours were assessed on five occasions over 20 years. Results Health behaviours explained a substantial part of the socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Cumulative behaviours and those that were more strongly associated with socioeconomic status had the greatest impact. For example, in the 1950s cohort, the age-sex adjusted hazard ratio comparing respondents with manual versus non-manual occupational status was 1.80 (1.25, 2.58); adjustment for cumulative smoking over 20 years attenuated the association by 49 %, diet by 43 %, drinking by 13 % and inactivity by only 1%. Conclusions Health behaviours have an important role in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality.
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subjectAdult ; Aged ; Alcohol Drinking - mortality ; Analysis ; Cohort ; Cohort Studies ; Diet - statistics & numerical data ; Exercise ; Family Medicine ; Female ; general ; General Practice ; Health aspects ; Health Behavior ; Health behaviours ; Health Psychology ; Humans ; Life cycles ; Male ; Medicine ; Medicine & Public Health ; Mental health ; Middle Aged ; Mortality ; Original ; Original Article ; Prospective Studies ; Psychiatry ; Psychology(all) ; Public health ; Risk Factors ; Scotland - epidemiology ; Smoking - mortality ; Social Class ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Socioeconomic status ; Study and teaching ; Survival Rate
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titleThe Role of Health Behaviours Across the Life Course in the Socioeconomic Patterning of All-Cause Mortality: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Prospective Cohort Study
authorWhitley, Elise ; Batty, G. David ; Hunt, Kate ; Popham, Frank ; Benzeval, Michaela
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abstractBackground Socioeconomic differentials in mortality are increasing in many industrialised countries. Purpose This study aims to examine the role of behaviours (smoking, alcohol, exercise, and diet) in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality and whether this varies over the life course, between cohorts and by gender. Methods Analysis of two representative population cohorts of men and women, born in the 1950s and 1930s, were performed. Health behaviours were assessed on five occasions over 20 years. Results Health behaviours explained a substantial part of the socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Cumulative behaviours and those that were more strongly associated with socioeconomic status had the greatest impact. For example, in the 1950s cohort, the age-sex adjusted hazard ratio comparing respondents with manual versus non-manual occupational status was 1.80 (1.25, 2.58); adjustment for cumulative smoking over 20 years attenuated the association by 49 %, diet by 43 %, drinking by 13 % and inactivity by only 1%. Conclusions Health behaviours have an important role in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality.
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