schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests

The terrestrial biosphere sequesters up to a third of annual anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen deposition contri... Full description

Journal Title: Biogeochemistry 2014-01-01, Vol.121 (2), p.305-316
Main Author: Frey, S. D
Other Authors: Ollinger, S , Nadelhoffer, K , Bowden, R , Brzostek, E , Burton, A , Caldwell, B. A , Crow, S , Goodale, C. L , Grandy, A. S , Finzi, A , Kramer, M. G , Lajtha, K , LeMoine, J , Martin, M , McDowell, W. H , Minocha, R , Sadowsky, J. J , Templer, P. H , Wickings, K
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cham: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0168-2563
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=28892848
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A384306991
title: Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests
format: Article
creator:
  • Frey, S. D
  • Ollinger, S
  • Nadelhoffer, K
  • Bowden, R
  • Brzostek, E
  • Burton, A
  • Caldwell, B. A
  • Crow, S
  • Goodale, C. L
  • Grandy, A. S
  • Finzi, A
  • Kramer, M. G
  • Lajtha, K
  • LeMoine, J
  • Martin, M
  • McDowell, W. H
  • Minocha, R
  • Sadowsky, J. J
  • Templer, P. H
  • Wickings, K
subjects:
  • Air pollution
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS
  • Biogeosciences
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Carbon content
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Earth Sciences
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Ecosystems
  • Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • Forest soils
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • general
  • Greenhouse effect
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Hardwoods
  • Life Sciences
  • Lignin
  • Mineral soils
  • Nitrogen
  • Organic horizons
  • Organic soils
  • Pollution, environment geology
  • Soil ecology
  • Soil organic matter
  • Soil respiration
  • Soils
  • Surficial geology
  • Synecology
  • Terrestrial ecosystems
  • Trees
ispartof: Biogeochemistry, 2014-01-01, Vol.121 (2), p.305-316
description: The terrestrial biosphere sequesters up to a third of annual anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen deposition contributes by enhancing tree productivity and promoting carbon storage in tree biomass. Forest soils also represent an important, but understudied carbon sink. Here, we examine the contribution of trees versus soil to total ecosystem carbon storage in a temperate forest and investigate the mechanisms by which soils accumulate carbon in response to two decades of elevated nitrogen inputs. We find that nitrogen-induced soil carbon accumulation is of equal or greater magnitude to carbon stored in trees, with the degree of response being dependent on stand type (hardwood versus pine) and level of N addition. Nitrogen enrichment resulted in a shift in organic matter chemistry and the microbial community such that unfertilized soils had a higher relative abundance of fungi and lipid, phenolic, and N-bearing compounds; whereas, N-amended plots were associated with reduced fungal biomass and activity and higher rates of lignin accumulation. We conclude that soil carbon accumulation in response to N enrichment was largely due to a suppression of organi matter decomposition rather than enhanced carbon inputs to soil via litter fall and root production.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0168-2563
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0168-2563
  • 1573-515X
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.7531867
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_cross
recordidTN_cdi_gale_infotracacademiconefile_A384306991
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA384306991
jstor_id24717580
sourcerecordidA384306991
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1477t-88bcb1a18a63eb3a7af38deb1404d4da1e8f0286fcbbd324cfd7d65b38d4ae290
addsrcrecordideNp9kE1r3DAQhkVJoZttf0APBV16dCJZsiUfw5J-QCCXBHpzZWm01eKVXI32kH9fbV0ayCEIRjCa59XwEPKRsyvOmLpGzjohGsZlwxir5Q3Z8E6JpuPdjwuyYbzXTdv14h25RDzUmUExsSE_d79yisHSGEpOe4jUOBdKSBEpnpYlAyJ1YNNxSfi3T010FOH3CbBAppjCTK3JU30JkRY4LpBNAepTZQu-J2-9mRE-_Lu35PHL7cPuW3N3__X77uau4VKp0mg92Ykbrk0vYBJGGS-0g4lLJp10hoP2rNW9t9PkRCutd8r13VSHpIF2YFtytebuzQxjiD6VbGw9Do7Bpgg-1P6N0FKwfhh4BfgK2JwQM_hxyeFo8tPI2Xh2Oq5Ox-p0PDutZUs-r8xi0JrZZxNtwP9gq_XQaqnrnHqRbUMxZ3t1qTC_-kO7klhD4x7yeEinHKu5V6FPK3TAkvLzOlJx1WnG_gCOAqSQ
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
display
typearticle
titleChronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests
creatorFrey, S. D ; Ollinger, S ; Nadelhoffer, K ; Bowden, R ; Brzostek, E ; Burton, A ; Caldwell, B. A ; Crow, S ; Goodale, C. L ; Grandy, A. S ; Finzi, A ; Kramer, M. G ; Lajtha, K ; LeMoine, J ; Martin, M ; McDowell, W. H ; Minocha, R ; Sadowsky, J. J ; Templer, P. H ; Wickings, K
creatorcontribFrey, S. D ; Ollinger, S ; Nadelhoffer, K ; Bowden, R ; Brzostek, E ; Burton, A ; Caldwell, B. A ; Crow, S ; Goodale, C. L ; Grandy, A. S ; Finzi, A ; Kramer, M. G ; Lajtha, K ; LeMoine, J ; Martin, M ; McDowell, W. H ; Minocha, R ; Sadowsky, J. J ; Templer, P. H ; Wickings, K
descriptionThe terrestrial biosphere sequesters up to a third of annual anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen deposition contributes by enhancing tree productivity and promoting carbon storage in tree biomass. Forest soils also represent an important, but understudied carbon sink. Here, we examine the contribution of trees versus soil to total ecosystem carbon storage in a temperate forest and investigate the mechanisms by which soils accumulate carbon in response to two decades of elevated nitrogen inputs. We find that nitrogen-induced soil carbon accumulation is of equal or greater magnitude to carbon stored in trees, with the degree of response being dependent on stand type (hardwood versus pine) and level of N addition. Nitrogen enrichment resulted in a shift in organic matter chemistry and the microbial community such that unfertilized soils had a higher relative abundance of fungi and lipid, phenolic, and N-bearing compounds; whereas, N-amended plots were associated with reduced fungal biomass and activity and higher rates of lignin accumulation. We conclude that soil carbon accumulation in response to N enrichment was largely due to a suppression of organi matter decomposition rather than enhanced carbon inputs to soil via litter fall and root production.
identifier
0ISSN: 0168-2563
1EISSN: 1573-515X
2DOI: 10.1007/s10533-014-0004-0
3CODEN: BIOGEP
languageeng
publisherCham: Springer
subjectAir pollution ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS ; Biogeosciences ; Biological and medical sciences ; Carbon content ; Carbon dioxide ; Earth and Environmental Science ; Earth Sciences ; Earth, ocean, space ; Ecosystems ; Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics ; Environmental Chemistry ; Evolutionary biology ; Exact sciences and technology ; Forest soils ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; general ; Greenhouse effect ; Greenhouse gases ; Hardwoods ; Life Sciences ; Lignin ; Mineral soils ; Nitrogen ; Organic horizons ; Organic soils ; Pollution, environment geology ; Soil ecology ; Soil organic matter ; Soil respiration ; Soils ; Surficial geology ; Synecology ; Terrestrial ecosystems ; Trees
ispartofBiogeochemistry, 2014-01-01, Vol.121 (2), p.305-316
rights
0Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014
12015 INIST-CNRS
2COPYRIGHT 2014 Springer
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1477t-88bcb1a18a63eb3a7af38deb1404d4da1e8f0286fcbbd324cfd7d65b38d4ae290
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1477t-88bcb1a18a63eb3a7af38deb1404d4da1e8f0286fcbbd324cfd7d65b38d4ae290
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=28892848$$DView record in Pascal Francis
search
creatorcontrib
0Frey, S. D
1Ollinger, S
2Nadelhoffer, K
3Bowden, R
4Brzostek, E
5Burton, A
6Caldwell, B. A
7Crow, S
8Goodale, C. L
9Grandy, A. S
10Finzi, A
11Kramer, M. G
12Lajtha, K
13LeMoine, J
14Martin, M
15McDowell, W. H
16Minocha, R
17Sadowsky, J. J
18Templer, P. H
19Wickings, K
title
0Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests
1Biogeochemistry
addtitleBiogeochemistry
descriptionThe terrestrial biosphere sequesters up to a third of annual anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen deposition contributes by enhancing tree productivity and promoting carbon storage in tree biomass. Forest soils also represent an important, but understudied carbon sink. Here, we examine the contribution of trees versus soil to total ecosystem carbon storage in a temperate forest and investigate the mechanisms by which soils accumulate carbon in response to two decades of elevated nitrogen inputs. We find that nitrogen-induced soil carbon accumulation is of equal or greater magnitude to carbon stored in trees, with the degree of response being dependent on stand type (hardwood versus pine) and level of N addition. Nitrogen enrichment resulted in a shift in organic matter chemistry and the microbial community such that unfertilized soils had a higher relative abundance of fungi and lipid, phenolic, and N-bearing compounds; whereas, N-amended plots were associated with reduced fungal biomass and activity and higher rates of lignin accumulation. We conclude that soil carbon accumulation in response to N enrichment was largely due to a suppression of organi matter decomposition rather than enhanced carbon inputs to soil via litter fall and root production.
subject
0Air pollution
1Animal and plant ecology
2Animal, plant and microbial ecology
3BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS
4Biogeosciences
5Biological and medical sciences
6Carbon content
7Carbon dioxide
8Earth and Environmental Science
9Earth Sciences
10Earth, ocean, space
11Ecosystems
12Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
13Environmental Chemistry
14Evolutionary biology
15Exact sciences and technology
16Forest soils
17Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
18general
19Greenhouse effect
20Greenhouse gases
21Hardwoods
22Life Sciences
23Lignin
24Mineral soils
25Nitrogen
26Organic horizons
27Organic soils
28Pollution, environment geology
29Soil ecology
30Soil organic matter
31Soil respiration
32Soils
33Surficial geology
34Synecology
35Terrestrial ecosystems
36Trees
issn
00168-2563
11573-515X
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9kE1r3DAQhkVJoZttf0APBV16dCJZsiUfw5J-QCCXBHpzZWm01eKVXI32kH9fbV0ayCEIRjCa59XwEPKRsyvOmLpGzjohGsZlwxir5Q3Z8E6JpuPdjwuyYbzXTdv14h25RDzUmUExsSE_d79yisHSGEpOe4jUOBdKSBEpnpYlAyJ1YNNxSfi3T010FOH3CbBAppjCTK3JU30JkRY4LpBNAepTZQu-J2-9mRE-_Lu35PHL7cPuW3N3__X77uau4VKp0mg92Ykbrk0vYBJGGS-0g4lLJp10hoP2rNW9t9PkRCutd8r13VSHpIF2YFtytebuzQxjiD6VbGw9Do7Bpgg-1P6N0FKwfhh4BfgK2JwQM_hxyeFo8tPI2Xh2Oq5Ox-p0PDutZUs-r8xi0JrZZxNtwP9gq_XQaqnrnHqRbUMxZ3t1qTC_-kO7klhD4x7yeEinHKu5V6FPK3TAkvLzOlJx1WnG_gCOAqSQ
startdate20140101
enddate20140101
creator
0Frey, S. D
1Ollinger, S
2Nadelhoffer, K
3Bowden, R
4Brzostek, E
5Burton, A
6Caldwell, B. A
7Crow, S
8Goodale, C. L
9Grandy, A. S
10Finzi, A
11Kramer, M. G
12Lajtha, K
13LeMoine, J
14Martin, M
15McDowell, W. H
16Minocha, R
17Sadowsky, J. J
18Templer, P. H
19Wickings, K
general
0Springer
1Springer International Publishing
scope
0IQODW
1AAYXX
2CITATION
3BSHEE
sort
creationdate20140101
titleChronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests
authorFrey, S. D ; Ollinger, S ; Nadelhoffer, K ; Bowden, R ; Brzostek, E ; Burton, A ; Caldwell, B. A ; Crow, S ; Goodale, C. L ; Grandy, A. S ; Finzi, A ; Kramer, M. G ; Lajtha, K ; LeMoine, J ; Martin, M ; McDowell, W. H ; Minocha, R ; Sadowsky, J. J ; Templer, P. H ; Wickings, K
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1477t-88bcb1a18a63eb3a7af38deb1404d4da1e8f0286fcbbd324cfd7d65b38d4ae290
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2014
topic
0Air pollution
1Animal and plant ecology
2Animal, plant and microbial ecology
3BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS
4Biogeosciences
5Biological and medical sciences
6Carbon content
7Carbon dioxide
8Earth and Environmental Science
9Earth Sciences
10Earth, ocean, space
11Ecosystems
12Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
13Environmental Chemistry
14Evolutionary biology
15Exact sciences and technology
16Forest soils
17Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
18general
19Greenhouse effect
20Greenhouse gases
21Hardwoods
22Life Sciences
23Lignin
24Mineral soils
25Nitrogen
26Organic horizons
27Organic soils
28Pollution, environment geology
29Soil ecology
30Soil organic matter
31Soil respiration
32Soils
33Surficial geology
34Synecology
35Terrestrial ecosystems
36Trees
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Frey, S. D
1Ollinger, S
2Nadelhoffer, K
3Bowden, R
4Brzostek, E
5Burton, A
6Caldwell, B. A
7Crow, S
8Goodale, C. L
9Grandy, A. S
10Finzi, A
11Kramer, M. G
12Lajtha, K
13LeMoine, J
14Martin, M
15McDowell, W. H
16Minocha, R
17Sadowsky, J. J
18Templer, P. H
19Wickings, K
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1CrossRef
2Academic OneFile (A&I only)
jtitleBiogeochemistry
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Frey, S. D
1Ollinger, S
2Nadelhoffer, K
3Bowden, R
4Brzostek, E
5Burton, A
6Caldwell, B. A
7Crow, S
8Goodale, C. L
9Grandy, A. S
10Finzi, A
11Kramer, M. G
12Lajtha, K
13LeMoine, J
14Martin, M
15McDowell, W. H
16Minocha, R
17Sadowsky, J. J
18Templer, P. H
19Wickings, K
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleChronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon in temperate forests
jtitleBiogeochemistry
stitleBiogeochemistry
date2014-01-01
risdate2014
volume121
issue2
spage305
epage316
pages305-316
issn0168-2563
eissn1573-515X
codenBIOGEP
abstractThe terrestrial biosphere sequesters up to a third of annual anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen deposition contributes by enhancing tree productivity and promoting carbon storage in tree biomass. Forest soils also represent an important, but understudied carbon sink. Here, we examine the contribution of trees versus soil to total ecosystem carbon storage in a temperate forest and investigate the mechanisms by which soils accumulate carbon in response to two decades of elevated nitrogen inputs. We find that nitrogen-induced soil carbon accumulation is of equal or greater magnitude to carbon stored in trees, with the degree of response being dependent on stand type (hardwood versus pine) and level of N addition. Nitrogen enrichment resulted in a shift in organic matter chemistry and the microbial community such that unfertilized soils had a higher relative abundance of fungi and lipid, phenolic, and N-bearing compounds; whereas, N-amended plots were associated with reduced fungal biomass and activity and higher rates of lignin accumulation. We conclude that soil carbon accumulation in response to N enrichment was largely due to a suppression of organi matter decomposition rather than enhanced carbon inputs to soil via litter fall and root production.
copCham
pubSpringer
doi10.1007/s10533-014-0004-0