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Impact of resurvey non-response on the associations between baseline risk factors and cardiovascular disease mortality: prospective cohort study

Background:Selection bias in observational epidemiology—the notion that people who participate in a study are fundamentally different from those who do not—is a perennial concern. In cohort studies, a potentially important but little investigated manifestation of selection bias is the distortion of... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979) 2009, Vol.63 (11), p.952-955
Main Author: Batty, G D
Other Authors: Gale, C R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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recordid: cdi_hal_primary_oai_HAL_hal_00509052v1
title: Impact of resurvey non-response on the associations between baseline risk factors and cardiovascular disease mortality: prospective cohort study
format: Article
creator:
  • Batty, G D
  • Gale, C R
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Bias
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
  • Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
  • Cohort analysis
  • General aspects
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Immune response
  • Life Style
  • Lost to Follow-Up
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Patient outcomes
  • Prospective Studies
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Reports
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk factors
  • Selection Bias
  • Surveys
  • United Kingdom - epidemiology
ispartof: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2009, Vol.63 (11), p.952-955
description: Background:Selection bias in observational epidemiology—the notion that people who participate in a study are fundamentally different from those who do not—is a perennial concern. In cohort studies, a potentially important but little investigated manifestation of selection bias is the distortion of the exposure–disease relationship according to participation status.Methods:Seven years after the original UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS1; N = 6484), attempts were made to resurvey participants (HALS2). The baseline characteristics, mortality experience following the completion of HALS2 and, finally, the baseline risk factor–cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality gradients in HALS2 non-participants (N = 1894) and participants (N = 4590) were compared.Results:Resurvey non-participants, based on data from HALS1, were younger, were of lower social class and had a lower prevalence of hypertension or self-reported limiting long-standing illness, but a higher prevalence of psychological distress (p⩽0.027). The risk of death from future CVD was significantly higher in those baseline study members who did not participate in HALS2. However, the magnitude of the association between a series of risk factors and CVD mortality was essentially the same in the HALS2 non-participants and participants (p value for interaction⩾0.108).Conclusion:In the present cohort study, non-response at resurvey did not bias the observed associations between baseline risk factors and later CVD mortality. Future studies should also examine the impact of non-response to baseline surveys on these relationships.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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titleImpact of resurvey non-response on the associations between baseline risk factors and cardiovascular disease mortality: prospective cohort study
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descriptionBackground:Selection bias in observational epidemiology—the notion that people who participate in a study are fundamentally different from those who do not—is a perennial concern. In cohort studies, a potentially important but little investigated manifestation of selection bias is the distortion of the exposure–disease relationship according to participation status.Methods:Seven years after the original UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS1; N = 6484), attempts were made to resurvey participants (HALS2). The baseline characteristics, mortality experience following the completion of HALS2 and, finally, the baseline risk factor–cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality gradients in HALS2 non-participants (N = 1894) and participants (N = 4590) were compared.Results:Resurvey non-participants, based on data from HALS1, were younger, were of lower social class and had a lower prevalence of hypertension or self-reported limiting long-standing illness, but a higher prevalence of psychological distress (p⩽0.027). The risk of death from future CVD was significantly higher in those baseline study members who did not participate in HALS2. However, the magnitude of the association between a series of risk factors and CVD mortality was essentially the same in the HALS2 non-participants and participants (p value for interaction⩾0.108).Conclusion:In the present cohort study, non-response at resurvey did not bias the observed associations between baseline risk factors and later CVD mortality. Future studies should also examine the impact of non-response to baseline surveys on these relationships.
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subjectAdult ; Bias ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; Cohort analysis ; General aspects ; Health Surveys ; Humans ; Immune response ; Life Style ; Lost to Follow-Up ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Patient outcomes ; Prospective Studies ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Reports ; Risk Assessment ; Risk factors ; Selection Bias ; Surveys ; United Kingdom - epidemiology
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abstractBackground:Selection bias in observational epidemiology—the notion that people who participate in a study are fundamentally different from those who do not—is a perennial concern. In cohort studies, a potentially important but little investigated manifestation of selection bias is the distortion of the exposure–disease relationship according to participation status.Methods:Seven years after the original UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS1; N = 6484), attempts were made to resurvey participants (HALS2). The baseline characteristics, mortality experience following the completion of HALS2 and, finally, the baseline risk factor–cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality gradients in HALS2 non-participants (N = 1894) and participants (N = 4590) were compared.Results:Resurvey non-participants, based on data from HALS1, were younger, were of lower social class and had a lower prevalence of hypertension or self-reported limiting long-standing illness, but a higher prevalence of psychological distress (p⩽0.027). The risk of death from future CVD was significantly higher in those baseline study members who did not participate in HALS2. However, the magnitude of the association between a series of risk factors and CVD mortality was essentially the same in the HALS2 non-participants and participants (p value for interaction⩾0.108).Conclusion:In the present cohort study, non-response at resurvey did not bias the observed associations between baseline risk factors and later CVD mortality. Future studies should also examine the impact of non-response to baseline surveys on these relationships.
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