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Plant-microbe-soil interactions in the rhizosphere: an evolutionary perspective

Soils are the product of the activities of plants, which supply organic matter and play a pivotal role in weathering rocks and minerals. Many plant species have a distinct ecological amplitude that shows restriction to specific soil types. In the numerous interactions between plants and soil, micro-... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2009, Vol.321 (1/2), p.83-115
Main Author: Lambers, Hans
Other Authors: Mougel, Christophe , Jaillard, Benoît , Hinsinger, Philippe
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
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recordid: cdi_hal_primary_oai_HAL_hal_02665203v1
title: Plant-microbe-soil interactions in the rhizosphere: an evolutionary perspective
format: Article
creator:
  • Lambers, Hans
  • Mougel, Christophe
  • Jaillard, Benoît
  • Hinsinger, Philippe
subjects:
  • Acid soils
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Clay soils
  • Ecology
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Forest soils
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Geochemistry
  • Life Sciences
  • Nutrients
  • Pedogenesis
  • Plant biology
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant roots
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • REVIEW ARTICLE
  • Rhizosphere
  • Soil ecology
  • Soil genesis
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil science
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil surveys, classification and mapping, soil genesis
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Symbiosis
  • Vegetal Biology
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2009, Vol.321 (1/2), p.83-115
description: Soils are the product of the activities of plants, which supply organic matter and play a pivotal role in weathering rocks and minerals. Many plant species have a distinct ecological amplitude that shows restriction to specific soil types. In the numerous interactions between plants and soil, micro-organisms also play a key role. Here we review the existing literature on interactions between plants, microorganisms and soils, and include considerations of evolutionary time scales, where possible. Some of these interactions involve intricate systems of communication, which in the case of symbioses such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis are several hundreds of millions years old; others involve the release of exudates from roots, and other products of rhizodeposition that are used as substrates for soil microorganisms. The possible reasons for the survival value of this loss of carbon over tens or hundreds of millions of years of evolution of higher plants are discussed, taking a cost-benefit approach. Coevolution of plants and rhizosphere microorganisms is discussed, in the light of known ecological interactions between various partners in terrestrial ecosystems. Finally, the role of higher plants, especially deep-rooted plants and associated microorganisms in the weathering of rocks and minerals, ultimately contributing to pedogenesis, is addressed. We show that rhizosphere processes in the long run are central to biogeochemical cycles, soil formation and Earth history. Major anticipated discoveries will enhance our basic understanding and allow applications of new knowledge to deal with nutrient deficiencies, pests and diseases, and the challenges of increasing global food production and agroecosystem productivity in an environmentally responsible manner.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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descriptionSoils are the product of the activities of plants, which supply organic matter and play a pivotal role in weathering rocks and minerals. Many plant species have a distinct ecological amplitude that shows restriction to specific soil types. In the numerous interactions between plants and soil, micro-organisms also play a key role. Here we review the existing literature on interactions between plants, microorganisms and soils, and include considerations of evolutionary time scales, where possible. Some of these interactions involve intricate systems of communication, which in the case of symbioses such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis are several hundreds of millions years old; others involve the release of exudates from roots, and other products of rhizodeposition that are used as substrates for soil microorganisms. The possible reasons for the survival value of this loss of carbon over tens or hundreds of millions of years of evolution of higher plants are discussed, taking a cost-benefit approach. Coevolution of plants and rhizosphere microorganisms is discussed, in the light of known ecological interactions between various partners in terrestrial ecosystems. Finally, the role of higher plants, especially deep-rooted plants and associated microorganisms in the weathering of rocks and minerals, ultimately contributing to pedogenesis, is addressed. We show that rhizosphere processes in the long run are central to biogeochemical cycles, soil formation and Earth history. Major anticipated discoveries will enhance our basic understanding and allow applications of new knowledge to deal with nutrient deficiencies, pests and diseases, and the challenges of increasing global food production and agroecosystem productivity in an environmentally responsible manner.
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subjectAcid soils ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Clay soils ; Ecology ; Evolutionary biology ; Forest soils ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Geochemistry ; Life Sciences ; Nutrients ; Pedogenesis ; Plant biology ; Plant Physiology ; Plant roots ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; REVIEW ARTICLE ; Rhizosphere ; Soil ecology ; Soil genesis ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil science ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil surveys, classification and mapping, soil genesis ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Symbiosis ; Vegetal Biology
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descriptionSoils are the product of the activities of plants, which supply organic matter and play a pivotal role in weathering rocks and minerals. Many plant species have a distinct ecological amplitude that shows restriction to specific soil types. In the numerous interactions between plants and soil, micro-organisms also play a key role. Here we review the existing literature on interactions between plants, microorganisms and soils, and include considerations of evolutionary time scales, where possible. Some of these interactions involve intricate systems of communication, which in the case of symbioses such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis are several hundreds of millions years old; others involve the release of exudates from roots, and other products of rhizodeposition that are used as substrates for soil microorganisms. The possible reasons for the survival value of this loss of carbon over tens or hundreds of millions of years of evolution of higher plants are discussed, taking a cost-benefit approach. Coevolution of plants and rhizosphere microorganisms is discussed, in the light of known ecological interactions between various partners in terrestrial ecosystems. Finally, the role of higher plants, especially deep-rooted plants and associated microorganisms in the weathering of rocks and minerals, ultimately contributing to pedogenesis, is addressed. We show that rhizosphere processes in the long run are central to biogeochemical cycles, soil formation and Earth history. Major anticipated discoveries will enhance our basic understanding and allow applications of new knowledge to deal with nutrient deficiencies, pests and diseases, and the challenges of increasing global food production and agroecosystem productivity in an environmentally responsible manner.
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2Animal, plant and microbial ecology
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4Biomedical and Life Sciences
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22Soil ecology
23Soil genesis
24Soil microorganisms
25Soil science
26Soil Science & Conservation
27Soil surveys, classification and mapping, soil genesis
28Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
29Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
30Symbiosis
31Vegetal Biology
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titlePlant-microbe-soil interactions in the rhizosphere: an evolutionary perspective
authorLambers, Hans ; Mougel, Christophe ; Jaillard, Benoît ; Hinsinger, Philippe
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abstractSoils are the product of the activities of plants, which supply organic matter and play a pivotal role in weathering rocks and minerals. Many plant species have a distinct ecological amplitude that shows restriction to specific soil types. In the numerous interactions between plants and soil, micro-organisms also play a key role. Here we review the existing literature on interactions between plants, microorganisms and soils, and include considerations of evolutionary time scales, where possible. Some of these interactions involve intricate systems of communication, which in the case of symbioses such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis are several hundreds of millions years old; others involve the release of exudates from roots, and other products of rhizodeposition that are used as substrates for soil microorganisms. The possible reasons for the survival value of this loss of carbon over tens or hundreds of millions of years of evolution of higher plants are discussed, taking a cost-benefit approach. Coevolution of plants and rhizosphere microorganisms is discussed, in the light of known ecological interactions between various partners in terrestrial ecosystems. Finally, the role of higher plants, especially deep-rooted plants and associated microorganisms in the weathering of rocks and minerals, ultimately contributing to pedogenesis, is addressed. We show that rhizosphere processes in the long run are central to biogeochemical cycles, soil formation and Earth history. Major anticipated discoveries will enhance our basic understanding and allow applications of new knowledge to deal with nutrient deficiencies, pests and diseases, and the challenges of increasing global food production and agroecosystem productivity in an environmentally responsible manner.
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