schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Root-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil

Dissolution of North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) in the rhizosphere of white lupin (Lupinus albus) and narrow leaf lupin (L. angustifolius) was measured in a growth chamber experiment. Plants were grown for 8-13 days in an artificial soil (pure alumina sand) at alkaline pH to eliminate dissolution... Full description

Journal Title: Australian journal of soil research 1995, Vol.33 (3), p.477-489
Main Author: HINSINGER, P
Other Authors: GILKES, R. J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Collingwood: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization CSIRO
ID: ISSN: 0004-9573
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_hal_primary_oai_HAL_hal_02704076v1
title: Root-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil
format: Article
creator:
  • HINSINGER, P
  • GILKES, R. J
subjects:
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Life Sciences
  • Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium fertilizations
  • Phosphorus fertilization
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
ispartof: Australian journal of soil research, 1995, Vol.33 (3), p.477-489
description: Dissolution of North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) in the rhizosphere of white lupin (Lupinus albus) and narrow leaf lupin (L. angustifolius) was measured in a growth chamber experiment. Plants were grown for 8-13 days in an artificial soil (pure alumina sand) at alkaline pH to eliminate dissolution of PR due to reaction with the soil. Phosphate rock was supplied as the sole source of P and Ca for the plants at two rates of application (0.1 and 1 mg P g-1 soil). Both species dissolved considerable amounts of PR (up to 70% of PR present within 3 mm from the roots). Phosphorus extracted from the soil with 0.5 M NaOH showed that up to 69% of dissolved P accumulated in the rhizosphere of both species due to sorption by the soil, particularly at the high rate of application. Only white lupin utilized significant amounts of Ca. Thus P and Ca uptake were not driving forces for the root-induced dissolution of PR which was probably due to proton excretion that occurred concurrently, as evidenced by a decrease of rhizosphere pH of about 2 pH units. White lupin dissolved up to twice as much PR than narrow leaf lupin. This may be related to either the larger root biomass of white lupin or the particular excretion activity of its proteoid roots. Keywords: Rhizosphere; Phosphate Rock; Proton Excretion; Dissolution; Lupinus-Albus ; Lupinus-Angustifolius ; Australian Journal of Soil Research 33(3) 477 - 489 Full text doi:10.1071/SR9950477 © CSIRO 1995
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0004-9573
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0004-9573
  • 1838-675X
  • 1446-568X
  • 1838-6768
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK1.8608181
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidhal_cross
recordidTN_cdi_hal_primary_oai_HAL_hal_02704076v1
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordidoai_HAL_hal_02704076v1
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c291t-9335f9522dc16d7bab3e6658df7d95f69a434d6a5762e7c5840b99873dcc5ed53
addsrcrecordideNpFkF9LwzAUxYMoOKcPfoMgvvhQTZp_zeMQdcJAmAo-WbIktXFZU5JO0U9vy0Z9uvee-zvn4QBwjtE1RgLfPC-lZIgKcQAmmFKeMV68HYIJQohmkglyDE5S-uxPUjAyAe_LELrMNWarrYHGpRT8tnOhgaGCbR1SW6vOwhj0GroGdnW_1-530G20A-S3rWsS_IjhuxkQ5dfKu8bCFJw_BUeV8sme7ecUvN7fvdzOs8XTw-PtbJHpXOIuk4SwSrI8NxpzI1ZqRSznrDCVMJJVXCpKqOGKCZ5boVlB0UrKQhCjNbOGkSm42uXWypdtdBsVf8qgXDmfLcpBQ7lAFAn-hf9ZHUNK0VajAaNyKLEcS-zZyx3bqqSVr6JqtEujgTAucMF77GIfmVwM4zvFfU5ZdxvyB9VtfSM
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
display
typearticle
titleRoot-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorHINSINGER, P ; GILKES, R. J
creatorcontribHINSINGER, P ; GILKES, R. J
descriptionDissolution of North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) in the rhizosphere of white lupin (Lupinus albus) and narrow leaf lupin (L. angustifolius) was measured in a growth chamber experiment. Plants were grown for 8-13 days in an artificial soil (pure alumina sand) at alkaline pH to eliminate dissolution of PR due to reaction with the soil. Phosphate rock was supplied as the sole source of P and Ca for the plants at two rates of application (0.1 and 1 mg P g-1 soil). Both species dissolved considerable amounts of PR (up to 70% of PR present within 3 mm from the roots). Phosphorus extracted from the soil with 0.5 M NaOH showed that up to 69% of dissolved P accumulated in the rhizosphere of both species due to sorption by the soil, particularly at the high rate of application. Only white lupin utilized significant amounts of Ca. Thus P and Ca uptake were not driving forces for the root-induced dissolution of PR which was probably due to proton excretion that occurred concurrently, as evidenced by a decrease of rhizosphere pH of about 2 pH units. White lupin dissolved up to twice as much PR than narrow leaf lupin. This may be related to either the larger root biomass of white lupin or the particular excretion activity of its proteoid roots. Keywords: Rhizosphere; Phosphate Rock; Proton Excretion; Dissolution; Lupinus-Albus ; Lupinus-Angustifolius ; Australian Journal of Soil Research 33(3) 477 - 489 Full text doi:10.1071/SR9950477 © CSIRO 1995
identifier
0ISSN: 0004-9573
1ISSN: 1838-675X
2EISSN: 1446-568X
3EISSN: 1838-6768
4DOI: 10.1071/SR9950477
5CODEN: ASORAB
languageeng
publisherCollingwood: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization CSIRO
subjectAgronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Biological and medical sciences ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Life Sciences ; Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium fertilizations ; Phosphorus fertilization ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
ispartofAustralian journal of soil research, 1995, Vol.33 (3), p.477-489
rights
01995 INIST-CNRS
1Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
lds50peer_reviewed
orcidid0000-0001-5458-1259
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink
0$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=3567186$$DView record in Pascal Francis
1$$Uhttps://hal.inrae.fr/hal-02704076$$DView record in HAL
search
creatorcontrib
0HINSINGER, P
1GILKES, R. J
title
0Root-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil
1Australian journal of soil research
descriptionDissolution of North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) in the rhizosphere of white lupin (Lupinus albus) and narrow leaf lupin (L. angustifolius) was measured in a growth chamber experiment. Plants were grown for 8-13 days in an artificial soil (pure alumina sand) at alkaline pH to eliminate dissolution of PR due to reaction with the soil. Phosphate rock was supplied as the sole source of P and Ca for the plants at two rates of application (0.1 and 1 mg P g-1 soil). Both species dissolved considerable amounts of PR (up to 70% of PR present within 3 mm from the roots). Phosphorus extracted from the soil with 0.5 M NaOH showed that up to 69% of dissolved P accumulated in the rhizosphere of both species due to sorption by the soil, particularly at the high rate of application. Only white lupin utilized significant amounts of Ca. Thus P and Ca uptake were not driving forces for the root-induced dissolution of PR which was probably due to proton excretion that occurred concurrently, as evidenced by a decrease of rhizosphere pH of about 2 pH units. White lupin dissolved up to twice as much PR than narrow leaf lupin. This may be related to either the larger root biomass of white lupin or the particular excretion activity of its proteoid roots. Keywords: Rhizosphere; Phosphate Rock; Proton Excretion; Dissolution; Lupinus-Albus ; Lupinus-Angustifolius ; Australian Journal of Soil Research 33(3) 477 - 489 Full text doi:10.1071/SR9950477 © CSIRO 1995
subject
0Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
1Biological and medical sciences
2Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
3General agronomy. Plant production
4Life Sciences
5Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium fertilizations
6Phosphorus fertilization
7Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
issn
00004-9573
11838-675X
21446-568X
31838-6768
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate1995
recordtypearticle
recordideNpFkF9LwzAUxYMoOKcPfoMgvvhQTZp_zeMQdcJAmAo-WbIktXFZU5JO0U9vy0Z9uvee-zvn4QBwjtE1RgLfPC-lZIgKcQAmmFKeMV68HYIJQohmkglyDE5S-uxPUjAyAe_LELrMNWarrYHGpRT8tnOhgaGCbR1SW6vOwhj0GroGdnW_1-530G20A-S3rWsS_IjhuxkQ5dfKu8bCFJw_BUeV8sme7ecUvN7fvdzOs8XTw-PtbJHpXOIuk4SwSrI8NxpzI1ZqRSznrDCVMJJVXCpKqOGKCZ5boVlB0UrKQhCjNbOGkSm42uXWypdtdBsVf8qgXDmfLcpBQ7lAFAn-hf9ZHUNK0VajAaNyKLEcS-zZyx3bqqSVr6JqtEujgTAucMF77GIfmVwM4zvFfU5ZdxvyB9VtfSM
startdate1995
enddate1995
creator
0HINSINGER, P
1GILKES, R. J
general
0Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization CSIRO
1CSIRO Publishing
scope
0IQODW
1AAYXX
2CITATION
31XC
orcididhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5458-1259
sort
creationdate1995
titleRoot-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil
authorHINSINGER, P ; GILKES, R. J
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c291t-9335f9522dc16d7bab3e6658df7d95f69a434d6a5762e7c5840b99873dcc5ed53
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate1995
topic
0Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
1Biological and medical sciences
2Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
3General agronomy. Plant production
4Life Sciences
5Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium fertilizations
6Phosphorus fertilization
7Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0HINSINGER, P
1GILKES, R. J
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1CrossRef
2Hyper Article en Ligne (HAL)
jtitleAustralian journal of soil research
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0HINSINGER, P
1GILKES, R. J
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleRoot-induced dissolution of phosphate rock in the rhizosphere of lupins grown in alkaline soil
jtitleAustralian journal of soil research
date1995
risdate1995
volume33
issue3
spage477
epage489
pages477-489
issn
00004-9573
11838-675X
eissn
01446-568X
11838-6768
codenASORAB
notesThe Australian Journal of Soil Research is an international journal of soil science publishing high quality research on: soil genesis, soil morphology and classification; soil physics and hydrology; soil chemistry and mineralogy; soil fertility and plant nutrition; soil biology and biochemistry; soil and water management and conservation; soil pollution and waste disposal
abstractDissolution of North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) in the rhizosphere of white lupin (Lupinus albus) and narrow leaf lupin (L. angustifolius) was measured in a growth chamber experiment. Plants were grown for 8-13 days in an artificial soil (pure alumina sand) at alkaline pH to eliminate dissolution of PR due to reaction with the soil. Phosphate rock was supplied as the sole source of P and Ca for the plants at two rates of application (0.1 and 1 mg P g-1 soil). Both species dissolved considerable amounts of PR (up to 70% of PR present within 3 mm from the roots). Phosphorus extracted from the soil with 0.5 M NaOH showed that up to 69% of dissolved P accumulated in the rhizosphere of both species due to sorption by the soil, particularly at the high rate of application. Only white lupin utilized significant amounts of Ca. Thus P and Ca uptake were not driving forces for the root-induced dissolution of PR which was probably due to proton excretion that occurred concurrently, as evidenced by a decrease of rhizosphere pH of about 2 pH units. White lupin dissolved up to twice as much PR than narrow leaf lupin. This may be related to either the larger root biomass of white lupin or the particular excretion activity of its proteoid roots. Keywords: Rhizosphere; Phosphate Rock; Proton Excretion; Dissolution; Lupinus-Albus ; Lupinus-Angustifolius ; Australian Journal of Soil Research 33(3) 477 - 489 Full text doi:10.1071/SR9950477 © CSIRO 1995
copCollingwood
pubCommonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization CSIRO
doi10.1071/SR9950477
orcididhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5458-1259