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Acetaldehyde, Microbes, and Cancer of the Digestive Tract

Excessive alcohol consumption and heavy smoking are the main risk factors of upper digestive tract cancer in industrialized countries. The association between heavy drinking and cancer appears to be particularly prominent in Asian individuals who have an inherited deficient ability to detoxify the f... Full description

Journal Title: Critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences 2003, Vol.40 (2), p.183-208
Main Author: Salaspuro, Mikko P
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Informa UK Ltd
ID: ISSN: 1040-8363
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12755455
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recordid: cdi_informaworld_taylorfrancis_310_1080_713609333
title: Acetaldehyde, Microbes, and Cancer of the Digestive Tract
format: Article
creator:
  • Salaspuro, Mikko P
subjects:
  • acetaldehyde
  • Acetaldehyde - metabolism
  • alcohol
  • alcohol dehydrogenase
  • Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
  • aldehyde dehydrogenase
  • Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - deficiency
  • Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - metabolism
  • Animals
  • atrophic gastritis
  • bacteria
  • cancer
  • colon cancer
  • Digestive System Neoplasms - etiology
  • Digestive System Neoplasms - metabolism
  • Digestive System Neoplasms - microbiology
  • digestive tract
  • esophageal cancer
  • ethanol
  • Ethanol - metabolism
  • Ethanol - toxicity
  • gastric cancer
  • gut flora
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Helicobacter pylori - metabolism
  • Helicobacter pylori microbes
  • Humans
  • microbes
  • oral cancer
  • Risk Factors
  • Saliva - metabolism
  • Smoking - adverse effects
ispartof: Critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, 2003, Vol.40 (2), p.183-208
description: Excessive alcohol consumption and heavy smoking are the main risk factors of upper digestive tract cancer in industrialized countries. The association between heavy drinking and cancer appears to be particularly prominent in Asian individuals who have an inherited deficient ability to detoxify the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation, acetaldehyde. Alcohol itself is not carcinogenic. However, according to cell culture and animal experiments acetaldehyde is highly toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. In addition to somatic cells, microbes representing normal human gut flora are also able to produce acetaldehyde from ethanol. After the ingestion of alcoholic beverages, this results in high local acetaldehyde concentrations in the saliva, gastric juice, and the contents of the large intestine. In addition, microbes may produce acetaldehyde endogenously without alcohol administration. This review summarizes the epidemiological, genetic, and biochemical evidence supporting the role of locally produced acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer. Special emphasis is given to those factors that regulate local acetaldehyde concentration in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract. The new evidence presented in this review may open a microbiological approach to the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer and may have an influence on future preventive strategies. Referee: Dr. Esteban Mezey, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, 921 Ross, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205-2195 USA
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1040-8363
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1040-8363
  • 1549-781X
url: Link


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descriptionExcessive alcohol consumption and heavy smoking are the main risk factors of upper digestive tract cancer in industrialized countries. The association between heavy drinking and cancer appears to be particularly prominent in Asian individuals who have an inherited deficient ability to detoxify the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation, acetaldehyde. Alcohol itself is not carcinogenic. However, according to cell culture and animal experiments acetaldehyde is highly toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. In addition to somatic cells, microbes representing normal human gut flora are also able to produce acetaldehyde from ethanol. After the ingestion of alcoholic beverages, this results in high local acetaldehyde concentrations in the saliva, gastric juice, and the contents of the large intestine. In addition, microbes may produce acetaldehyde endogenously without alcohol administration. This review summarizes the epidemiological, genetic, and biochemical evidence supporting the role of locally produced acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer. Special emphasis is given to those factors that regulate local acetaldehyde concentration in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract. The new evidence presented in this review may open a microbiological approach to the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer and may have an influence on future preventive strategies. Referee: Dr. Esteban Mezey, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, 921 Ross, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205-2195 USA
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subjectacetaldehyde ; Acetaldehyde - metabolism ; alcohol ; alcohol dehydrogenase ; Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects ; aldehyde dehydrogenase ; Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - deficiency ; Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - metabolism ; Animals ; atrophic gastritis ; bacteria ; cancer ; colon cancer ; Digestive System Neoplasms - etiology ; Digestive System Neoplasms - metabolism ; Digestive System Neoplasms - microbiology ; digestive tract ; esophageal cancer ; ethanol ; Ethanol - metabolism ; Ethanol - toxicity ; gastric cancer ; gut flora ; Helicobacter pylori ; Helicobacter pylori - metabolism ; Helicobacter pylori microbes ; Humans ; microbes ; oral cancer ; Risk Factors ; Saliva - metabolism ; Smoking - adverse effects
ispartofCritical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, 2003, Vol.40 (2), p.183-208
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abstractExcessive alcohol consumption and heavy smoking are the main risk factors of upper digestive tract cancer in industrialized countries. The association between heavy drinking and cancer appears to be particularly prominent in Asian individuals who have an inherited deficient ability to detoxify the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation, acetaldehyde. Alcohol itself is not carcinogenic. However, according to cell culture and animal experiments acetaldehyde is highly toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. In addition to somatic cells, microbes representing normal human gut flora are also able to produce acetaldehyde from ethanol. After the ingestion of alcoholic beverages, this results in high local acetaldehyde concentrations in the saliva, gastric juice, and the contents of the large intestine. In addition, microbes may produce acetaldehyde endogenously without alcohol administration. This review summarizes the epidemiological, genetic, and biochemical evidence supporting the role of locally produced acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer. Special emphasis is given to those factors that regulate local acetaldehyde concentration in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract. The new evidence presented in this review may open a microbiological approach to the pathogenesis of digestive tract cancer and may have an influence on future preventive strategies. Referee: Dr. Esteban Mezey, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, 921 Ross, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205-2195 USA
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