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Phylogeny and Biogeography of Tsuga (Pinaceae) Inferred from Nuclear Ribosomal Its and Chloroplast DNA Sequence Data

Hemlock, Tsuga (Pinaceae), has a disjunct distribution in North America and Asia. To examine the biogeographic history of Tsuga, phylogenetic relationships among multiple accessions of all nine species were inferred using chloroplast DNA sequences and multiple cloned sequences of the nuclear ribosom... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic botany 2008, Vol.33 (3), p.478-489
Main Author: Havill, Nathan P
Other Authors: Campbell, Christopher S , Vining, Thomas F , LePage, Ben , Bayer, Randall J , Donoghue, Michael J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
DNA
s
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: The American Society of Plant Taxonomists, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0363-6445
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title: Phylogeny and Biogeography of Tsuga (Pinaceae) Inferred from Nuclear Ribosomal Its and Chloroplast DNA Sequence Data
format: Article
creator:
  • Havill, Nathan P
  • Campbell, Christopher S
  • Vining, Thomas F
  • LePage, Ben
  • Bayer, Randall J
  • Donoghue, Michael J
subjects:
  • ANCESTRAL AREA RECONSTRUCTION
  • Biogeography
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Conifers
  • Datasets
  • DNA
  • Fossils
  • Genetic aspects
  • Hemlocks (Trees)
  • Identification and classification
  • INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER
  • PHYLOGENETIC INCONGRUENCE
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Phylogeny (Botany)
  • Plants
  • Pollen
  • RPL16 INTRON
  • s
  • Taxa
  • TRNK-MATK INTRON
  • TRNL-F REGION
ispartof: Systematic botany, 2008, Vol.33 (3), p.478-489
description: Hemlock, Tsuga (Pinaceae), has a disjunct distribution in North America and Asia. To examine the biogeographic history of Tsuga, phylogenetic relationships among multiple accessions of all nine species were inferred using chloroplast DNA sequences and multiple cloned sequences of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Analysis of chloroplast and ITS sequences resolve a clade that includes the two western North American species, T. heterophylla and T. mertensiana, and a clade of Asian species within which one of the eastern North American species, T. caroliniana, is nested. The other eastern North American species, T. canadensis, is sister to the Asian clade. Tsuga chinensis from Taiwan did not group with T. chinensis from mainland China, and T. sieboldii from Ullung Island did not group with T. sieboldii from Japan suggesting that the taxonomic status of these distinct populations should be reevaluated. The Himalayan species, T. dumosa, was in conflicting positions in the chloroplast and ITS trees, suggesting that it may be of hybrid origin. Likelihood-based biogeographic inference with divergence time estimates infers an Eocene basal crown group diversification and an initial widespread circumpolar distribution with subsequent vicariance and extinction events leading to the current disjunct distribution.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0363-6445
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0363-6445
  • 1548-2324
url: Link


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titlePhylogeny and Biogeography of Tsuga (Pinaceae) Inferred from Nuclear Ribosomal Its and Chloroplast DNA Sequence Data
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creatorHavill, Nathan P ; Campbell, Christopher S ; Vining, Thomas F ; LePage, Ben ; Bayer, Randall J ; Donoghue, Michael J
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descriptionHemlock, Tsuga (Pinaceae), has a disjunct distribution in North America and Asia. To examine the biogeographic history of Tsuga, phylogenetic relationships among multiple accessions of all nine species were inferred using chloroplast DNA sequences and multiple cloned sequences of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Analysis of chloroplast and ITS sequences resolve a clade that includes the two western North American species, T. heterophylla and T. mertensiana, and a clade of Asian species within which one of the eastern North American species, T. caroliniana, is nested. The other eastern North American species, T. canadensis, is sister to the Asian clade. Tsuga chinensis from Taiwan did not group with T. chinensis from mainland China, and T. sieboldii from Ullung Island did not group with T. sieboldii from Japan suggesting that the taxonomic status of these distinct populations should be reevaluated. The Himalayan species, T. dumosa, was in conflicting positions in the chloroplast and ITS trees, suggesting that it may be of hybrid origin. Likelihood-based biogeographic inference with divergence time estimates infers an Eocene basal crown group diversification and an initial widespread circumpolar distribution with subsequent vicariance and extinction events leading to the current disjunct distribution.
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subjectANCESTRAL AREA RECONSTRUCTION ; Biogeography ; Biological taxonomies ; Conifers ; Datasets ; DNA ; Fossils ; Genetic aspects ; Hemlocks (Trees) ; Identification and classification ; INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER ; PHYLOGENETIC INCONGRUENCE ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Phylogeny (Botany) ; Plants ; Pollen ; RPL16 INTRON ; s ; Taxa ; TRNK-MATK INTRON ; TRNL-F REGION
ispartofSystematic botany, 2008, Vol.33 (3), p.478-489
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descriptionHemlock, Tsuga (Pinaceae), has a disjunct distribution in North America and Asia. To examine the biogeographic history of Tsuga, phylogenetic relationships among multiple accessions of all nine species were inferred using chloroplast DNA sequences and multiple cloned sequences of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Analysis of chloroplast and ITS sequences resolve a clade that includes the two western North American species, T. heterophylla and T. mertensiana, and a clade of Asian species within which one of the eastern North American species, T. caroliniana, is nested. The other eastern North American species, T. canadensis, is sister to the Asian clade. Tsuga chinensis from Taiwan did not group with T. chinensis from mainland China, and T. sieboldii from Ullung Island did not group with T. sieboldii from Japan suggesting that the taxonomic status of these distinct populations should be reevaluated. The Himalayan species, T. dumosa, was in conflicting positions in the chloroplast and ITS trees, suggesting that it may be of hybrid origin. Likelihood-based biogeographic inference with divergence time estimates infers an Eocene basal crown group diversification and an initial widespread circumpolar distribution with subsequent vicariance and extinction events leading to the current disjunct distribution.
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1Biogeography
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5DNA
6Fossils
7Genetic aspects
8Hemlocks (Trees)
9Identification and classification
10INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER
11PHYLOGENETIC INCONGRUENCE
12Phylogenetics
13Phylogeny
14Phylogeny (Botany)
15Plants
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titlePhylogeny and Biogeography of Tsuga (Pinaceae) Inferred from Nuclear Ribosomal Its and Chloroplast DNA Sequence Data
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atitlePhylogeny and Biogeography of Tsuga (Pinaceae) Inferred from Nuclear Ribosomal Its and Chloroplast DNA Sequence Data
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abstractHemlock, Tsuga (Pinaceae), has a disjunct distribution in North America and Asia. To examine the biogeographic history of Tsuga, phylogenetic relationships among multiple accessions of all nine species were inferred using chloroplast DNA sequences and multiple cloned sequences of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Analysis of chloroplast and ITS sequences resolve a clade that includes the two western North American species, T. heterophylla and T. mertensiana, and a clade of Asian species within which one of the eastern North American species, T. caroliniana, is nested. The other eastern North American species, T. canadensis, is sister to the Asian clade. Tsuga chinensis from Taiwan did not group with T. chinensis from mainland China, and T. sieboldii from Ullung Island did not group with T. sieboldii from Japan suggesting that the taxonomic status of these distinct populations should be reevaluated. The Himalayan species, T. dumosa, was in conflicting positions in the chloroplast and ITS trees, suggesting that it may be of hybrid origin. Likelihood-based biogeographic inference with divergence time estimates infers an Eocene basal crown group diversification and an initial widespread circumpolar distribution with subsequent vicariance and extinction events leading to the current disjunct distribution.
pubThe American Society of Plant Taxonomists, Inc
doi10.1600/036364408785679770
tpages12