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Co-occurrence patterns of Bornean vertebrates suggest competitive exclusion is strongest among distantly related species

Assessing the importance of deterministic processes in structuring ecological communities is a central focus of community ecology. Typically, community ecologists study a single taxonomic group, which precludes detection of potentially important biotic interactions between distantly related species,... Full description

Journal Title: Oecologia 2013-11-01, Vol.173 (3), p.1053-1062
Main Author: Beaudrot, Lydia
Other Authors: Struebig, Matthew J , Meijaard, Erik , van Balen, S , Husson, Simon , Marshall, Andrew J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0029-8549
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recordid: cdi_jstor_primary_24033568
title: Co-occurrence patterns of Bornean vertebrates suggest competitive exclusion is strongest among distantly related species
format: Article
creator:
  • Beaudrot, Lydia
  • Struebig, Matthew J
  • Meijaard, Erik
  • van Balen, S
  • Husson, Simon
  • Marshall, Andrew J
subjects:
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal Distribution - physiology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Animals
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological Evolution
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Birds
  • Borneo
  • Checkerboard
  • Checkerboards
  • Community assembly
  • COMMUNITY ECOLOGY
  • Community ecology - Original research
  • Competitive Behavior - physiology
  • Competitive exclusion
  • Ecological competition
  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General aspects
  • Hydrology/Water Resources
  • Interspecific competition
  • Life Sciences
  • Niche differentiation
  • Plant Sciences
  • Primates
  • Southeast Asia
  • Species
  • Species Specificity
  • Squirrels
  • Synecology
  • Taxa
  • Vertebrates - physiology
ispartof: Oecologia, 2013-11-01, Vol.173 (3), p.1053-1062
description: Assessing the importance of deterministic processes in structuring ecological communities is a central focus of community ecology. Typically, community ecologists study a single taxonomic group, which precludes detection of potentially important biotic interactions between distantly related species, and inherently assumes competition is strongest between closely related species. We examined distribution patterns of vertebrate species across the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia to assess the extent to which inter-specific competition may have shaped ecological communities on the island and whether the intensity of inter-specific competition in present-day communities varies as a function of evolutionary relatedness. We investigated the relative extent of competition within and between species of primates, birds, bats and squirrels using species presence–absence and attribute data compiled for 21 forested sites across Borneo. We calculated for each species pair the checkerboard unit value (CU), a statistic that is often interpreted as indicating the importance of interspecific competition. The percentage of species pairs with significant CUs was lowest in within-taxon comparisons. Moreover, for invertebrate-eating species the percentage of significantly checkerboarded species pairs was highest in comparisons between primates and other taxa, particularly birds and squirrels. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that competitive interactions between distantly related species may have shaped the distribution of species and thus the composition of Bornean vertebrate communities. This research highlights the importance of taking into account the broad mammalian and avian communities in which species occur for understanding the factors that structure biodiversity.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-8549
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-8549
  • 1432-1939
url: Link


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titleCo-occurrence patterns of Bornean vertebrates suggest competitive exclusion is strongest among distantly related species
creatorBeaudrot, Lydia ; Struebig, Matthew J ; Meijaard, Erik ; van Balen, S ; Husson, Simon ; Marshall, Andrew J
creatorcontribBeaudrot, Lydia ; Struebig, Matthew J ; Meijaard, Erik ; van Balen, S ; Husson, Simon ; Marshall, Andrew J
descriptionAssessing the importance of deterministic processes in structuring ecological communities is a central focus of community ecology. Typically, community ecologists study a single taxonomic group, which precludes detection of potentially important biotic interactions between distantly related species, and inherently assumes competition is strongest between closely related species. We examined distribution patterns of vertebrate species across the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia to assess the extent to which inter-specific competition may have shaped ecological communities on the island and whether the intensity of inter-specific competition in present-day communities varies as a function of evolutionary relatedness. We investigated the relative extent of competition within and between species of primates, birds, bats and squirrels using species presence–absence and attribute data compiled for 21 forested sites across Borneo. We calculated for each species pair the checkerboard unit value (CU), a statistic that is often interpreted as indicating the importance of interspecific competition. The percentage of species pairs with significant CUs was lowest in within-taxon comparisons. Moreover, for invertebrate-eating species the percentage of significantly checkerboarded species pairs was highest in comparisons between primates and other taxa, particularly birds and squirrels. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that competitive interactions between distantly related species may have shaped the distribution of species and thus the composition of Bornean vertebrate communities. This research highlights the importance of taking into account the broad mammalian and avian communities in which species occur for understanding the factors that structure biodiversity.
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subjectAnimal and plant ecology ; Animal Distribution - physiology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Animals ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological Evolution ; Biological taxonomies ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Birds ; Borneo ; Checkerboard ; Checkerboards ; Community assembly ; COMMUNITY ECOLOGY ; Community ecology - Original research ; Competitive Behavior - physiology ; Competitive exclusion ; Ecological competition ; Ecology ; Ecosystem ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General aspects ; Hydrology/Water Resources ; Interspecific competition ; Life Sciences ; Niche differentiation ; Plant Sciences ; Primates ; Southeast Asia ; Species ; Species Specificity ; Squirrels ; Synecology ; Taxa ; Vertebrates - physiology
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abstractAssessing the importance of deterministic processes in structuring ecological communities is a central focus of community ecology. Typically, community ecologists study a single taxonomic group, which precludes detection of potentially important biotic interactions between distantly related species, and inherently assumes competition is strongest between closely related species. We examined distribution patterns of vertebrate species across the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia to assess the extent to which inter-specific competition may have shaped ecological communities on the island and whether the intensity of inter-specific competition in present-day communities varies as a function of evolutionary relatedness. We investigated the relative extent of competition within and between species of primates, birds, bats and squirrels using species presence–absence and attribute data compiled for 21 forested sites across Borneo. We calculated for each species pair the checkerboard unit value (CU), a statistic that is often interpreted as indicating the importance of interspecific competition. The percentage of species pairs with significant CUs was lowest in within-taxon comparisons. Moreover, for invertebrate-eating species the percentage of significantly checkerboarded species pairs was highest in comparisons between primates and other taxa, particularly birds and squirrels. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that competitive interactions between distantly related species may have shaped the distribution of species and thus the composition of Bornean vertebrate communities. This research highlights the importance of taking into account the broad mammalian and avian communities in which species occur for understanding the factors that structure biodiversity.
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