schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

A Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species

The biogeographical history of several important vegetables is still unclear. In the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, this applies to melon and cucumber, but also to many species of more regional importance. Cucumeropsis mannii is cultivated in West Tropical Africa for its nutritious seeds. Family-wide... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic botany 2010, Vol.35 (3), p.534-540
Main Author: Schaefer, Hanno
Other Authors: Renner, Susanne S
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: American Society of Plant Toxonomists
ID: ISSN: 0363-6445
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_jstor_primary_40802548
title: A Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species
format: Article
creator:
  • Schaefer, Hanno
  • Renner, Susanne S
subjects:
  • Benincaseae
  • Biogeography
  • Biological evolution
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Biology
  • Botanical gardens
  • Botany
  • Cucurbitaceae
  • DNA BARCODING
  • Egusi
  • Fruits
  • Herbaria
  • Identification and classification
  • Long Distance Dispersal
  • Molecular Phylogenetics
  • Morphology
  • Nucleotides
  • Oil-Rich Seeds
  • Phenetics
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Physiological aspects
  • Plants
ispartof: Systematic botany, 2010, Vol.35 (3), p.534-540
description: The biogeographical history of several important vegetables is still unclear. In the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, this applies to melon and cucumber, but also to many species of more regional importance. Cucumeropsis mannii is cultivated in West Tropical Africa for its nutritious seeds. Family-wide phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is closest to Posadaea sphaerocarpa from Central and South America, the seeds of which are also eaten and the fruit of which is made into bowls. To reconstruct these species' historical biogeography, we sequenced six plastid markers and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region for several accessions of both species, plus all relevant outgroups. Morphological traits were studied in 102 herbarium specimens representing both species. A 5,155 nucleotide-long matrix of chloroplast and nuclear DNA contained a single informative mutation in a poly-C region of nuclear ITS among six accessions that covered the species' native ranges. Next-closest species differed in all plastid markers and by ≥34 mutations in ITS1 and ITS2. Study of the morphology revealed a possible small difference in fruit shape (cylindrical-ovate versus spherical), presumably resulting from human selection on the African populations. The closest outgroups Melancium and Melothria are endemic to the neotropics, and maximum likelihood area reconstruction indicates that Cucumeropsis mannii also originated there. The near-absence of genetic and morphological differentiation implies that gene flow between Cucumeropsis manni and Posadaea sphaerocarpa stopped relatively recently, and taxonomically they should (or could) be treated as one species. Transport of seeds during the transatlantic slave trade is a possible scenario, although we cannot reject natural dispersal.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0363-6445
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0363-6445
  • 1548-2324
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.1992402
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_jstor
recordidTN_cdi_jstor_primary_40802548
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
ingidaspt/sb/2010/00000035/00000003/art00009
galeidA236721286
jstor_id40802548
sourcerecordidA236721286
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1524t-4a8a81d074f0d7569a9b2e0505eecd9875ae8dd014763eb6aaf2383ab60f57473
addsrcrecordideNqNkc2KFDEQxxtRcFx9AUHIUQ-zVr6606dlGHQVllVwZY-hOp3MZpjuNElG0afYR97M9OBBUUwgqaTq96-kqqpeUjinNcBb4DWvhaDQtEy0UlH1qFpQKdSScSYeV4tDwLJEyKfVs5S2ANDWQBfV_YpcepeJi2Eg-c6Sa_ud3Ia46y_ITTne2pTJykVvcCTrGCay3pv9YIuVfCIDjqP3BMf-CK-K4xj5OSTs0SJJ0x2WYINxQvL6wMbOZzQW7RuC0R6xLziUZbLG2_S8euJwl-yL035WfX3_7mb9YXn16fLjenW1pJKJvBSoUNEeGuGgb2TdYtsxCxKktaZvVSPRqr4HKpqa265GdIwrjl0NTjai4WfV-ay7wZ3VfnQhRzRl9nbwJozW-XK_YrxuGGWqLgCbARNDStE6PUU_YPyhKehDE_SfTSiQ-g0y5ffZh7Fk87t_o69mdJtyiL-SCVDASmOL_2L2-3Fjx4x6G_ZxLCXTmKasU6cZFHk4Di5PBnCNMR-Mtihc_0XBm1nk9Cypv3E58iLIKLRQayqo0r11uN9lnTHqzU-dDoIwC3Y-lAr-T4EeAAm10EY
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
display
typearticle
titleA Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorSchaefer, Hanno ; Renner, Susanne S
creatorcontribSchaefer, Hanno ; Renner, Susanne S
descriptionThe biogeographical history of several important vegetables is still unclear. In the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, this applies to melon and cucumber, but also to many species of more regional importance. Cucumeropsis mannii is cultivated in West Tropical Africa for its nutritious seeds. Family-wide phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is closest to Posadaea sphaerocarpa from Central and South America, the seeds of which are also eaten and the fruit of which is made into bowls. To reconstruct these species' historical biogeography, we sequenced six plastid markers and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region for several accessions of both species, plus all relevant outgroups. Morphological traits were studied in 102 herbarium specimens representing both species. A 5,155 nucleotide-long matrix of chloroplast and nuclear DNA contained a single informative mutation in a poly-C region of nuclear ITS among six accessions that covered the species' native ranges. Next-closest species differed in all plastid markers and by ≥34 mutations in ITS1 and ITS2. Study of the morphology revealed a possible small difference in fruit shape (cylindrical-ovate versus spherical), presumably resulting from human selection on the African populations. The closest outgroups Melancium and Melothria are endemic to the neotropics, and maximum likelihood area reconstruction indicates that Cucumeropsis mannii also originated there. The near-absence of genetic and morphological differentiation implies that gene flow between Cucumeropsis manni and Posadaea sphaerocarpa stopped relatively recently, and taxonomically they should (or could) be treated as one species. Transport of seeds during the transatlantic slave trade is a possible scenario, although we cannot reject natural dispersal.
identifier
0ISSN: 0363-6445
1EISSN: 1548-2324
2DOI: 10.1600/036364410792495818
languageeng
publisherAmerican Society of Plant Toxonomists
subjectBenincaseae ; Biogeography ; Biological evolution ; Biological taxonomies ; Biology ; Botanical gardens ; Botany ; Cucurbitaceae ; DNA BARCODING ; Egusi ; Fruits ; Herbaria ; Identification and classification ; Long Distance Dispersal ; Molecular Phylogenetics ; Morphology ; Nucleotides ; Oil-Rich Seeds ; Phenetics ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Physiological aspects ; Plants
ispartofSystematic botany, 2010, Vol.35 (3), p.534-540
rights
0Copyright 2010 by the American Society of Plant Taxonomists
1Copyright 2010 American Society of Plant Taxonomists
2COPYRIGHT 2010 American Society of Plant Taxonomists
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1524t-4a8a81d074f0d7569a9b2e0505eecd9875ae8dd014763eb6aaf2383ab60f57473
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontrib
0Schaefer, Hanno
1Renner, Susanne S
title
0A Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species
1Systematic botany
descriptionThe biogeographical history of several important vegetables is still unclear. In the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, this applies to melon and cucumber, but also to many species of more regional importance. Cucumeropsis mannii is cultivated in West Tropical Africa for its nutritious seeds. Family-wide phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is closest to Posadaea sphaerocarpa from Central and South America, the seeds of which are also eaten and the fruit of which is made into bowls. To reconstruct these species' historical biogeography, we sequenced six plastid markers and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region for several accessions of both species, plus all relevant outgroups. Morphological traits were studied in 102 herbarium specimens representing both species. A 5,155 nucleotide-long matrix of chloroplast and nuclear DNA contained a single informative mutation in a poly-C region of nuclear ITS among six accessions that covered the species' native ranges. Next-closest species differed in all plastid markers and by ≥34 mutations in ITS1 and ITS2. Study of the morphology revealed a possible small difference in fruit shape (cylindrical-ovate versus spherical), presumably resulting from human selection on the African populations. The closest outgroups Melancium and Melothria are endemic to the neotropics, and maximum likelihood area reconstruction indicates that Cucumeropsis mannii also originated there. The near-absence of genetic and morphological differentiation implies that gene flow between Cucumeropsis manni and Posadaea sphaerocarpa stopped relatively recently, and taxonomically they should (or could) be treated as one species. Transport of seeds during the transatlantic slave trade is a possible scenario, although we cannot reject natural dispersal.
subject
0Benincaseae
1Biogeography
2Biological evolution
3Biological taxonomies
4Biology
5Botanical gardens
6Botany
7Cucurbitaceae
8DNA BARCODING
9Egusi
10Fruits
11Herbaria
12Identification and classification
13Long Distance Dispersal
14Molecular Phylogenetics
15Morphology
16Nucleotides
17Oil-Rich Seeds
18Phenetics
19Phylogenetics
20Phylogeny
21Physiological aspects
22Plants
issn
00363-6445
11548-2324
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2010
recordtypearticle
recordideNqNkc2KFDEQxxtRcFx9AUHIUQ-zVr6606dlGHQVllVwZY-hOp3MZpjuNElG0afYR97M9OBBUUwgqaTq96-kqqpeUjinNcBb4DWvhaDQtEy0UlH1qFpQKdSScSYeV4tDwLJEyKfVs5S2ANDWQBfV_YpcepeJi2Eg-c6Sa_ud3Ia46y_ITTne2pTJykVvcCTrGCay3pv9YIuVfCIDjqP3BMf-CK-K4xj5OSTs0SJJ0x2WYINxQvL6wMbOZzQW7RuC0R6xLziUZbLG2_S8euJwl-yL035WfX3_7mb9YXn16fLjenW1pJKJvBSoUNEeGuGgb2TdYtsxCxKktaZvVSPRqr4HKpqa265GdIwrjl0NTjai4WfV-ay7wZ3VfnQhRzRl9nbwJozW-XK_YrxuGGWqLgCbARNDStE6PUU_YPyhKehDE_SfTSiQ-g0y5ffZh7Fk87t_o69mdJtyiL-SCVDASmOL_2L2-3Fjx4x6G_ZxLCXTmKasU6cZFHk4Di5PBnCNMR-Mtihc_0XBm1nk9Cypv3E58iLIKLRQayqo0r11uN9lnTHqzU-dDoIwC3Y-lAr-T4EeAAm10EY
startdate201007
enddate201007
creator
0Schaefer, Hanno
1Renner, Susanne S
general
0American Society of Plant Toxonomists
1American Society of Plant Taxonomists
scope
0AAYXX
1CITATION
sort
creationdate201007
titleA Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species
authorSchaefer, Hanno ; Renner, Susanne S
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1524t-4a8a81d074f0d7569a9b2e0505eecd9875ae8dd014763eb6aaf2383ab60f57473
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2010
topic
0Benincaseae
1Biogeography
2Biological evolution
3Biological taxonomies
4Biology
5Botanical gardens
6Botany
7Cucurbitaceae
8DNA BARCODING
9Egusi
10Fruits
11Herbaria
12Identification and classification
13Long Distance Dispersal
14Molecular Phylogenetics
15Morphology
16Nucleotides
17Oil-Rich Seeds
18Phenetics
19Phylogenetics
20Phylogeny
21Physiological aspects
22Plants
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Schaefer, Hanno
1Renner, Susanne S
collectionCrossRef
jtitleSystematic botany
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Schaefer, Hanno
1Renner, Susanne S
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleA Gift from the New World? The West African Crop Cucumeropsis mannii and the American Posadaea sphaerocarpa (Cucurbitaceae) are the Same Species
jtitleSystematic botany
date2010-07
risdate2010
volume35
issue3
spage534
epage540
pages534-540
issn0363-6445
eissn1548-2324
notes0363-6445(20100901)35:3L.534;1-
abstractThe biogeographical history of several important vegetables is still unclear. In the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, this applies to melon and cucumber, but also to many species of more regional importance. Cucumeropsis mannii is cultivated in West Tropical Africa for its nutritious seeds. Family-wide phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is closest to Posadaea sphaerocarpa from Central and South America, the seeds of which are also eaten and the fruit of which is made into bowls. To reconstruct these species' historical biogeography, we sequenced six plastid markers and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region for several accessions of both species, plus all relevant outgroups. Morphological traits were studied in 102 herbarium specimens representing both species. A 5,155 nucleotide-long matrix of chloroplast and nuclear DNA contained a single informative mutation in a poly-C region of nuclear ITS among six accessions that covered the species' native ranges. Next-closest species differed in all plastid markers and by ≥34 mutations in ITS1 and ITS2. Study of the morphology revealed a possible small difference in fruit shape (cylindrical-ovate versus spherical), presumably resulting from human selection on the African populations. The closest outgroups Melancium and Melothria are endemic to the neotropics, and maximum likelihood area reconstruction indicates that Cucumeropsis mannii also originated there. The near-absence of genetic and morphological differentiation implies that gene flow between Cucumeropsis manni and Posadaea sphaerocarpa stopped relatively recently, and taxonomically they should (or could) be treated as one species. Transport of seeds during the transatlantic slave trade is a possible scenario, although we cannot reject natural dispersal.
pubAmerican Society of Plant Toxonomists
doi10.1600/036364410792495818
tpages7