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Prevalence of Drug Resistance Mutations in Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Genes of North Central Mexico HIV Isolates

This study set out to determine the frequency of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive subjects of the north central Mexican state of San Luis Potosí. Mexican studies of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations have focused mainly on large metropolitan areas and border towns su... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS research and human retroviruses 2018-06-01, Vol.34 (6), p.498-506
Main Author: Hernandez-Sanchez, Pedro Gerardo
Other Authors: Guerra-Palomares, Sandra Elizabeth , Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis , Arguello, Jesus Rafael , Noyola, Daniel Ernesto , Garcia-Sepulveda, Christian Alberto
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0889-2229
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title: Prevalence of Drug Resistance Mutations in Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Genes of North Central Mexico HIV Isolates
format: Article
creator:
  • Hernandez-Sanchez, Pedro Gerardo
  • Guerra-Palomares, Sandra Elizabeth
  • Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis
  • Arguello, Jesus Rafael
  • Noyola, Daniel Ernesto
  • Garcia-Sepulveda, Christian Alberto
subjects:
  • Epidemiology
ispartof: AIDS research and human retroviruses, 2018-06-01, Vol.34 (6), p.498-506
description: This study set out to determine the frequency of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive subjects of the north central Mexican state of San Luis Potosí. Mexican studies of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations have focused mainly on large metropolitan areas and border towns subjected to intense international migrations. This study set forth to describe the frequency of these mutations in a Mexican region less subjected to such migratory influences and more representative of smaller Mexican cities. Thirty-eight full-length pol sequences spanning the protease, reverse-transcriptase, and integrase-encoding regions were obtained from 42 treatment-naive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Most exhibited subtype B homology, but CRF02_AG was also detected. Evidence of APOBEC3 hypermutation was seen in two samples. Calibrated population analysis revealed a surveillance drug resistance mutation prevalence of 4.9% for protease inhibitors, of 2.7% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, of 8.1% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and an overall prevalence of 9.5%. This corresponds to an intermediate level of transmitted drug resistance according to the World Health Organization. The identification of integrase mutations suggests that transmitted drug mutations are being imported, as inhibitors targeting integrase have not been widely used in Mexico. Our results provide a greater understanding of HIV diversity in Mexico and highlight the way internal migrations allow HIV mutations and genetic features to permeate regions less subjected to international migrations. The implications of these findings will become more evident as Mexico hosts increased repatriations of migrants in the coming years.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0889-2229
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0889-2229
  • 1931-8405
url: Link


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titlePrevalence of Drug Resistance Mutations in Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Genes of North Central Mexico HIV Isolates
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descriptionThis study set out to determine the frequency of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive subjects of the north central Mexican state of San Luis Potosí. Mexican studies of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations have focused mainly on large metropolitan areas and border towns subjected to intense international migrations. This study set forth to describe the frequency of these mutations in a Mexican region less subjected to such migratory influences and more representative of smaller Mexican cities. Thirty-eight full-length pol sequences spanning the protease, reverse-transcriptase, and integrase-encoding regions were obtained from 42 treatment-naive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Most exhibited subtype B homology, but CRF02_AG was also detected. Evidence of APOBEC3 hypermutation was seen in two samples. Calibrated population analysis revealed a surveillance drug resistance mutation prevalence of 4.9% for protease inhibitors, of 2.7% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, of 8.1% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and an overall prevalence of 9.5%. This corresponds to an intermediate level of transmitted drug resistance according to the World Health Organization. The identification of integrase mutations suggests that transmitted drug mutations are being imported, as inhibitors targeting integrase have not been widely used in Mexico. Our results provide a greater understanding of HIV diversity in Mexico and highlight the way internal migrations allow HIV mutations and genetic features to permeate regions less subjected to international migrations. The implications of these findings will become more evident as Mexico hosts increased repatriations of migrants in the coming years.
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abstractThis study set out to determine the frequency of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive subjects of the north central Mexican state of San Luis Potosí. Mexican studies of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations have focused mainly on large metropolitan areas and border towns subjected to intense international migrations. This study set forth to describe the frequency of these mutations in a Mexican region less subjected to such migratory influences and more representative of smaller Mexican cities. Thirty-eight full-length pol sequences spanning the protease, reverse-transcriptase, and integrase-encoding regions were obtained from 42 treatment-naive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Most exhibited subtype B homology, but CRF02_AG was also detected. Evidence of APOBEC3 hypermutation was seen in two samples. Calibrated population analysis revealed a surveillance drug resistance mutation prevalence of 4.9% for protease inhibitors, of 2.7% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, of 8.1% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and an overall prevalence of 9.5%. This corresponds to an intermediate level of transmitted drug resistance according to the World Health Organization. The identification of integrase mutations suggests that transmitted drug mutations are being imported, as inhibitors targeting integrase have not been widely used in Mexico. Our results provide a greater understanding of HIV diversity in Mexico and highlight the way internal migrations allow HIV mutations and genetic features to permeate regions less subjected to international migrations. The implications of these findings will become more evident as Mexico hosts increased repatriations of migrants in the coming years.
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