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Spaced Learning Enhances Subsequent Recognition Memory by Reducing Neural Repetition Suppression

Spaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of cognitive neuroscience 2011-07-01, Vol.23 (7), p.1624-1633
Main Author: Xue, Gui
Other Authors: Mei, Leilei , Chen, Chuansheng , Lu, Zhong-Lin , Poldrack, Russell , Dong, Qi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
NMR
Publisher: One Rogers Street, Cambridge, MA 02142-1209, USA: MIT Press
ID: ISSN: 0898-929X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617892
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recordid: cdi_mit_journals_10_1162_jocn_2010_21532
title: Spaced Learning Enhances Subsequent Recognition Memory by Reducing Neural Repetition Suppression
format: Article
creator:
  • Xue, Gui
  • Mei, Leilei
  • Chen, Chuansheng
  • Lu, Zhong-Lin
  • Poldrack, Russell
  • Dong, Qi
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Article
  • Articles
  • Brain
  • education
  • Face
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Learning
  • Learning - physiology
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Memory
  • Mental Recall - physiology
  • Neural Inhibition - physiology
  • Neurosciences
  • NMR
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance
  • Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
  • Photic Stimulation - methods
  • Recognition (Psychology)
  • Recognition (Psychology) - physiology
  • Studies
  • Time Factors
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 2011-07-01, Vol.23 (7), p.1624-1633
description: Spaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half under the massed learning condition (i.e., four consecutive repetitions with jittered interstimulus interval) and the other half under the spaced learning condition (i.e., the four repetitions were interleaved). Recognition memory tests afterward revealed a significant spacing effect: Participants recognized more items learned under the spaced learning condition than under the massed learning condition. Successful face memory encoding was associated with stronger activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, which showed a significant repetition suppression effect modulated by subsequent memory status and spaced learning. Specifically, remembered faces showed smaller repetition suppression than forgotten faces under both learning conditions, and spaced learning significantly reduced repetition suppression. These results suggest that spaced learning enhances recognition memory by reducing neural repetition suppression.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0898-929X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0898-929X
  • 1530-8898
url: Link


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descriptionSpaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half under the massed learning condition (i.e., four consecutive repetitions with jittered interstimulus interval) and the other half under the spaced learning condition (i.e., the four repetitions were interleaved). Recognition memory tests afterward revealed a significant spacing effect: Participants recognized more items learned under the spaced learning condition than under the massed learning condition. Successful face memory encoding was associated with stronger activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, which showed a significant repetition suppression effect modulated by subsequent memory status and spaced learning. Specifically, remembered faces showed smaller repetition suppression than forgotten faces under both learning conditions, and spaced learning significantly reduced repetition suppression. These results suggest that spaced learning enhances recognition memory by reducing neural repetition suppression.
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subjectAdult ; Article ; Articles ; Brain ; education ; Face ; Female ; Humans ; Learning ; Learning - physiology ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Memory ; Mental Recall - physiology ; Neural Inhibition - physiology ; Neurosciences ; NMR ; Nuclear magnetic resonance ; Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology ; Photic Stimulation - methods ; Recognition (Psychology) ; Recognition (Psychology) - physiology ; Studies ; Time Factors ; Young Adult
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abstractSpaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half under the massed learning condition (i.e., four consecutive repetitions with jittered interstimulus interval) and the other half under the spaced learning condition (i.e., the four repetitions were interleaved). Recognition memory tests afterward revealed a significant spacing effect: Participants recognized more items learned under the spaced learning condition than under the massed learning condition. Successful face memory encoding was associated with stronger activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, which showed a significant repetition suppression effect modulated by subsequent memory status and spaced learning. Specifically, remembered faces showed smaller repetition suppression than forgotten faces under both learning conditions, and spaced learning significantly reduced repetition suppression. These results suggest that spaced learning enhances recognition memory by reducing neural repetition suppression.
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