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The training curriculum in hospital infection control

Standardised training curricula for infection control nurses (ICNs) and recognition of the specialty exist in many European countries, but infection control physician (ICP) is not a specialty recognised by the UEMS. To gather information on curricula for ICPs, members of the ESCMID Study Group on No... Full description

Journal Title: Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2005, Vol.11 (s1), p.33-35
Main Author: Voss, A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 1198-743X
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recordid: cdi_narcis_primary_ru_oai_repository_ubn_ru_nl_2066_47431
title: The training curriculum in hospital infection control
format: Article
creator:
  • Voss, A
subjects:
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cross Infection - prevention & control
  • Curriculum
  • Europe
  • General aspects
  • Health Policy
  • Human infectious diseases. Experimental studies and models
  • Humans
  • Infection Control
  • infection control nurse
  • infection control physician
  • Infection Control Practitioners - education
  • infection control structure
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medical sciences
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • training
ispartof: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 2005, Vol.11 (s1), p.33-35
description: Standardised training curricula for infection control nurses (ICNs) and recognition of the specialty exist in many European countries, but infection control physician (ICP) is not a specialty recognised by the UEMS. To gather information on curricula for ICPs, members of the ESCMID Study Group on Nosocomial Infections received a questionnaire. There is discussion about which ‘professions’ should be included in an infection control team. Within the 12 countries included, the average full-time equivalents (FTEs) for ICPs and ICNs per 1000 beds were 1.2 and 3.4, respectively. In addition to ICNs and ICPs, an infection control team should also include a data manager, an epidemiologist, secretarial/administrative support, and possibly, surveillance technicians. Overall, the composition of an ideal infection control team was estimated to be 9.3 FTE per 1000 beds. The background of ICPs can be clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Among the participants, it was predominantly clinical microbiology. The ideal training curriculum for the ICP should include 6 years of postgraduate training. Of these, at least 2 years should be ‘clinical training’ (e.g., internal medicine) to acquire experience in the management of high-risk patients. Furthermore, training with regard to infection control and hospital epidemiology should be offered as a ‘common trunk’ for those being trained in clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Important issues that remain are: implementation/standardisation of training curricula for doctors, recognition of ICP as a separate specialty or sub-specialty of clinical microbiology and/or infectious diseases, validation of on-the-job training facilities in terms of the number of doctors and nurses who can give training and the category of patients/problems present, and mandatory postgraduate education/continuing medical education specific for infection control for doctors and nurses in the field.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1198-743X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1198-743X
  • 1470-9465
  • 1469-0691
url: Link


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descriptionStandardised training curricula for infection control nurses (ICNs) and recognition of the specialty exist in many European countries, but infection control physician (ICP) is not a specialty recognised by the UEMS. To gather information on curricula for ICPs, members of the ESCMID Study Group on Nosocomial Infections received a questionnaire. There is discussion about which ‘professions’ should be included in an infection control team. Within the 12 countries included, the average full-time equivalents (FTEs) for ICPs and ICNs per 1000 beds were 1.2 and 3.4, respectively. In addition to ICNs and ICPs, an infection control team should also include a data manager, an epidemiologist, secretarial/administrative support, and possibly, surveillance technicians. Overall, the composition of an ideal infection control team was estimated to be 9.3 FTE per 1000 beds. The background of ICPs can be clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Among the participants, it was predominantly clinical microbiology. The ideal training curriculum for the ICP should include 6 years of postgraduate training. Of these, at least 2 years should be ‘clinical training’ (e.g., internal medicine) to acquire experience in the management of high-risk patients. Furthermore, training with regard to infection control and hospital epidemiology should be offered as a ‘common trunk’ for those being trained in clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Important issues that remain are: implementation/standardisation of training curricula for doctors, recognition of ICP as a separate specialty or sub-specialty of clinical microbiology and/or infectious diseases, validation of on-the-job training facilities in terms of the number of doctors and nurses who can give training and the category of patients/problems present, and mandatory postgraduate education/continuing medical education specific for infection control for doctors and nurses in the field.
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subjectBiological and medical sciences ; Cross Infection - prevention & control ; Curriculum ; Europe ; General aspects ; Health Policy ; Human infectious diseases. Experimental studies and models ; Humans ; Infection Control ; infection control nurse ; infection control physician ; Infection Control Practitioners - education ; infection control structure ; Infectious Diseases ; Medical sciences ; Microbiology (medical) ; training
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notesPanel of ESGNI members: F. Allerberger (Austria), E. Bouza (Spain), B. Cookson (UK), F. Daschner (Germany), M. Dettenkofer (Germany), P. Gastmeier (Germany), B. Gordts (Belgium), P. Heczko (Poland), B. Jovanovic (Serbia and Montenegro), W. Koller (Austria), H. Mittermeyer (Austria), E. Nagy (Hungary), H. Richet (France), S. Unal (Turkey), A. Widmer (Switzerland)
abstractStandardised training curricula for infection control nurses (ICNs) and recognition of the specialty exist in many European countries, but infection control physician (ICP) is not a specialty recognised by the UEMS. To gather information on curricula for ICPs, members of the ESCMID Study Group on Nosocomial Infections received a questionnaire. There is discussion about which ‘professions’ should be included in an infection control team. Within the 12 countries included, the average full-time equivalents (FTEs) for ICPs and ICNs per 1000 beds were 1.2 and 3.4, respectively. In addition to ICNs and ICPs, an infection control team should also include a data manager, an epidemiologist, secretarial/administrative support, and possibly, surveillance technicians. Overall, the composition of an ideal infection control team was estimated to be 9.3 FTE per 1000 beds. The background of ICPs can be clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Among the participants, it was predominantly clinical microbiology. The ideal training curriculum for the ICP should include 6 years of postgraduate training. Of these, at least 2 years should be ‘clinical training’ (e.g., internal medicine) to acquire experience in the management of high-risk patients. Furthermore, training with regard to infection control and hospital epidemiology should be offered as a ‘common trunk’ for those being trained in clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Important issues that remain are: implementation/standardisation of training curricula for doctors, recognition of ICP as a separate specialty or sub-specialty of clinical microbiology and/or infectious diseases, validation of on-the-job training facilities in terms of the number of doctors and nurses who can give training and the category of patients/problems present, and mandatory postgraduate education/continuing medical education specific for infection control for doctors and nurses in the field.
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