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Phylogenetically structured traits in root systems influence arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in woody angiosperms

Background and aim There is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root order... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2016, Vol.404 (1/2), p.1-12
Main Author: Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar J
Other Authors: Horning, Amber L , Smemo, Kurt A , Blackwood, Christopher B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cham: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1247638
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recordid: cdi_osti_scitechconnect_1247638
title: Phylogenetically structured traits in root systems influence arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in woody angiosperms
format: Article
creator:
  • Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar J
  • Horning, Amber L
  • Smemo, Kurt A
  • Blackwood, Christopher B
subjects:
  • angiosperm evolution
  • Angiosperms
  • arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
  • BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • cortex area
  • Ecology
  • Evolution
  • Fungi
  • Genetic aspects
  • Life Sciences
  • Morphology
  • Mycorrhizas
  • nutrient uptake strategies
  • Observations
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Plant nutrition
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant roots
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • Quantitative trait loci
  • Regular Article
  • root functional traits
  • root order integration
  • Root stele
  • Root systems
  • Soil quality
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soils
  • Trees
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2016, Vol.404 (1/2), p.1-12
description: Background and aim There is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root orders (i.e., high root trait integration), whereas more derived species are expected to display a sharp transition from acquisition to structural roots. Moreover, we hypothesized that interspecific morphological differences rather than soil conditions will be the main driver of AMF colonization. Methods We analyzed 14 root morphological and chemical traits and AMF colonization rates for the first three root orders of 34 temperate tree species grown in two common gardens. We also collected associated soil to measure the effect of soil conditions on AMF colonization. Results Thick-root magnoliids showed less variation in root traits along root orders than more-derived angiosperm groups. Variation in stele: root diameter ratio was the best indicator of AMF colonization within and across root orders. Root functional traits rather than soil conditions largely explained the variation in AMF colonization among species. Conclusions Not only the traits of first order but the entire structuring of the root system varied among plant lineages, suggesting alternative evolutionary strategies of resource acquisition. Understanding evolutionary pathways in belowground organs could open new avenues to understand tree species influence on soil carbon and nutrient cycling.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titlePhylogenetically structured traits in root systems influence arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in woody angiosperms
creatorValverde-Barrantes, Oscar J ; Horning, Amber L ; Smemo, Kurt A ; Blackwood, Christopher B
creatorcontribValverde-Barrantes, Oscar J ; Horning, Amber L ; Smemo, Kurt A ; Blackwood, Christopher B ; Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States)
descriptionBackground and aim There is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root orders (i.e., high root trait integration), whereas more derived species are expected to display a sharp transition from acquisition to structural roots. Moreover, we hypothesized that interspecific morphological differences rather than soil conditions will be the main driver of AMF colonization. Methods We analyzed 14 root morphological and chemical traits and AMF colonization rates for the first three root orders of 34 temperate tree species grown in two common gardens. We also collected associated soil to measure the effect of soil conditions on AMF colonization. Results Thick-root magnoliids showed less variation in root traits along root orders than more-derived angiosperm groups. Variation in stele: root diameter ratio was the best indicator of AMF colonization within and across root orders. Root functional traits rather than soil conditions largely explained the variation in AMF colonization among species. Conclusions Not only the traits of first order but the entire structuring of the root system varied among plant lineages, suggesting alternative evolutionary strategies of resource acquisition. Understanding evolutionary pathways in belowground organs could open new avenues to understand tree species influence on soil carbon and nutrient cycling.
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subjectangiosperm evolution ; Angiosperms ; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi ; BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ; Biochemistry ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; cortex area ; Ecology ; Evolution ; Fungi ; Genetic aspects ; Life Sciences ; Morphology ; Mycorrhizas ; nutrient uptake strategies ; Observations ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Plant nutrition ; Plant Physiology ; Plant roots ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; Quantitative trait loci ; Regular Article ; root functional traits ; root order integration ; Root stele ; Root systems ; Soil quality ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soils ; Trees
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descriptionBackground and aim There is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root orders (i.e., high root trait integration), whereas more derived species are expected to display a sharp transition from acquisition to structural roots. Moreover, we hypothesized that interspecific morphological differences rather than soil conditions will be the main driver of AMF colonization. Methods We analyzed 14 root morphological and chemical traits and AMF colonization rates for the first three root orders of 34 temperate tree species grown in two common gardens. We also collected associated soil to measure the effect of soil conditions on AMF colonization. Results Thick-root magnoliids showed less variation in root traits along root orders than more-derived angiosperm groups. Variation in stele: root diameter ratio was the best indicator of AMF colonization within and across root orders. Root functional traits rather than soil conditions largely explained the variation in AMF colonization among species. Conclusions Not only the traits of first order but the entire structuring of the root system varied among plant lineages, suggesting alternative evolutionary strategies of resource acquisition. Understanding evolutionary pathways in belowground organs could open new avenues to understand tree species influence on soil carbon and nutrient cycling.
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abstractBackground and aim There is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root orders (i.e., high root trait integration), whereas more derived species are expected to display a sharp transition from acquisition to structural roots. Moreover, we hypothesized that interspecific morphological differences rather than soil conditions will be the main driver of AMF colonization. Methods We analyzed 14 root morphological and chemical traits and AMF colonization rates for the first three root orders of 34 temperate tree species grown in two common gardens. We also collected associated soil to measure the effect of soil conditions on AMF colonization. Results Thick-root magnoliids showed less variation in root traits along root orders than more-derived angiosperm groups. Variation in stele: root diameter ratio was the best indicator of AMF colonization within and across root orders. Root functional traits rather than soil conditions largely explained the variation in AMF colonization among species. Conclusions Not only the traits of first order but the entire structuring of the root system varied among plant lineages, suggesting alternative evolutionary strategies of resource acquisition. Understanding evolutionary pathways in belowground organs could open new avenues to understand tree species influence on soil carbon and nutrient cycling.
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