schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Investigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland

Abstract Background The Alcohol etc (Scotland) Act 2010 was implemented in Scotland on Oct 1, 2011, and included a ban on multi-buy discounts of alcohol in Scotland's supermarkets and off licences (ie, off trade). The main aim of the legislation was to remove the price incentive for consumers to pur... Full description

Journal Title: The Lancet (British edition) 2013, Vol.382 (S3), p.S17-S17
Main Author: Robinson, Mark, BSc
Other Authors: Geue, Claudia, PhD , Lewsey, James, PhD , Mackay, Daniel, PhD , McCartney, Gerry, MD , Curnock, Esther, MPH , Beeston, Clare, MPH
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0140-6736
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_1464980076
title: Investigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland
format: Article
creator:
  • Robinson, Mark, BSc
  • Geue, Claudia, PhD
  • Lewsey, James, PhD
  • Mackay, Daniel, PhD
  • McCartney, Gerry, MD
  • Curnock, Esther, MPH
  • Beeston, Clare, MPH
subjects:
  • Internal Medicine
ispartof: The Lancet (British edition), 2013, Vol.382 (S3), p.S17-S17
description: Abstract Background The Alcohol etc (Scotland) Act 2010 was implemented in Scotland on Oct 1, 2011, and included a ban on multi-buy discounts of alcohol in Scotland's supermarkets and off licences (ie, off trade). The main aim of the legislation was to remove the price incentive for consumers to purchase more alcohol than they may otherwise have intended and, in turn, to reduce population levels of alcohol consumption. Alcohol sales data provide the best estimate of population alcohol consumption. We have investigated the effect of the introduction of the Alcohol Act on off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland. Methods We obtained data for the volume of pure alcohol sold off trade in Scotland and in England and Wales from market research specialists Nielsen (Oxford, UK) for individual weeks between January, 2009, and September, 2012 ( appendix ). Sales estimates were produced from electronic sales records from most large multiple retailers and a weighted stratified random sample of smaller retailers. We have previously shown that alcohol retail sales data offer a robust source of data for measurement and monitoring of alcohol consumption in Scotland and England and Wales. We used interrupted autoregressive integrated moving average time-series models to test for any change in off-trade alcohol sales (all alcohol and by drink type) after the introduction of the Alcohol Act in Scotland. Models accounted for underlying seasonal and secular trends and were adjusted for changes in other potential confounding factors including disposable income, alcohol prices, and on-trade alcohol sales. Data for these covariates were obtained from the Scottish Government and Office for National Statistics; Nielsen and Office for National Statistics; and CGA Strategy (Stockport, UK), respectively. To provide a concurrent control group, we did the same analyses using data for England and Wales, where the Alcohol Act does not apply. Findings The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with a 2·6% decrease in per-adult off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland (95% CI −5·3 to 0·2). This decline was driven by changes in off-trade wine sales, which decreased by 4·0% after the Act was introduced (95% CI −5·4 to −2·6). The Act was also associated with reduced sales of pre-mixed alcohol beverages (–8·5%, 95% CI −12·7 to −4·1), although these account for a very small proportion of total off-trade sales (1%). The Act was not associated with changes in sales of spirits, beer, or cider or perr
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0140-6736
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0140-6736
  • 1474-547X
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.3452122
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_cross
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_journals_1464980076
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid3146226951
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c1856-c37c46735f9531e32772a8cfb2db26540d224330d68292d67497ce4800b0cd193
addsrcrecordideNqFkE1rFTEUhkNR8Fr9CULAjS6mzdckd1wopfQLCi6q4C5kkjNtappck0zx_vtm7hULblyFA8_75JwXoXeUHFFC5fENoYJ0UnH5gfKPkgnBOn6AVlQo0fVC_XiBVn-RV-h1KfeEECFJv0L1Kj5Cqf7WVJ8iThOud4BhmsDWZTL4YQ7Vd-O8xc4Xm-ZY8WgaucBTV7NxgE2w6S4FXEyA8qmFoqlzNgHD7w1k_wAt5CO-sakGE90b9HIyocDbP-8h-n5-9u30srv-enF1enLdWbruZWe5sqLt3E9DzylwphQzazuNzI1M9oI4xgTnxMk1G5iTSgzKglgTMhLr6MAP0fu9d5PTr7mdqe_TnGP7UlMhxdBIJRvV7ymbUykZJr1pK5u81ZTopWC9K1gv7WnK9a5gzVvuyz4H7YRHD1kX6yFacD639rRL_r-Gz_8YbPDRWxN-whbK87K6ME32ksVB-c7A-ROlEJZx
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1464980076
display
typearticle
titleInvestigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorRobinson, Mark, BSc ; Geue, Claudia, PhD ; Lewsey, James, PhD ; Mackay, Daniel, PhD ; McCartney, Gerry, MD ; Curnock, Esther, MPH ; Beeston, Clare, MPH
creatorcontribRobinson, Mark, BSc ; Geue, Claudia, PhD ; Lewsey, James, PhD ; Mackay, Daniel, PhD ; McCartney, Gerry, MD ; Curnock, Esther, MPH ; Beeston, Clare, MPH
descriptionAbstract Background The Alcohol etc (Scotland) Act 2010 was implemented in Scotland on Oct 1, 2011, and included a ban on multi-buy discounts of alcohol in Scotland's supermarkets and off licences (ie, off trade). The main aim of the legislation was to remove the price incentive for consumers to purchase more alcohol than they may otherwise have intended and, in turn, to reduce population levels of alcohol consumption. Alcohol sales data provide the best estimate of population alcohol consumption. We have investigated the effect of the introduction of the Alcohol Act on off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland. Methods We obtained data for the volume of pure alcohol sold off trade in Scotland and in England and Wales from market research specialists Nielsen (Oxford, UK) for individual weeks between January, 2009, and September, 2012 ( appendix ). Sales estimates were produced from electronic sales records from most large multiple retailers and a weighted stratified random sample of smaller retailers. We have previously shown that alcohol retail sales data offer a robust source of data for measurement and monitoring of alcohol consumption in Scotland and England and Wales. We used interrupted autoregressive integrated moving average time-series models to test for any change in off-trade alcohol sales (all alcohol and by drink type) after the introduction of the Alcohol Act in Scotland. Models accounted for underlying seasonal and secular trends and were adjusted for changes in other potential confounding factors including disposable income, alcohol prices, and on-trade alcohol sales. Data for these covariates were obtained from the Scottish Government and Office for National Statistics; Nielsen and Office for National Statistics; and CGA Strategy (Stockport, UK), respectively. To provide a concurrent control group, we did the same analyses using data for England and Wales, where the Alcohol Act does not apply. Findings The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with a 2·6% decrease in per-adult off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland (95% CI −5·3 to 0·2). This decline was driven by changes in off-trade wine sales, which decreased by 4·0% after the Act was introduced (95% CI −5·4 to −2·6). The Act was also associated with reduced sales of pre-mixed alcohol beverages (–8·5%, 95% CI −12·7 to −4·1), although these account for a very small proportion of total off-trade sales (1%). The Act was not associated with changes in sales of spirits, beer, or cider or perry in Scotland. There was no evidence to support an association between off-trade alcohol sales and the dummy Alcohol Act variable in England and Wales. Interpretation The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with reduced off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland, largely attributable to a decline in wine sales. Key strengths of our study include the use of objective data for alcohol sales rather than subjective data on self-reported consumption, and the adjustment of our time-series models for underlying trends and potential confounders. Limitations include the exclusion of alcohol sales by certain retailers, the inability to disaggregate population sales estimates by different subgroups, and the short period after implementation of the Act. However, similar changes were not noted in England and Wales, where the Act does not apply, which lends weight to the hypothesis that the changes witnessed in Scotland were as a result of the Act rather than other unmeasured factors or biases. Thus, legislation to ban alcohol discounting seems an important policy in the mix to reduce population alcohol consumption levels. Funding Purchase of the sales data was funded by the Scottish Government as part of the wider Monitoring and Evaluating Scotland's Alcohol Strategy portfolio of studies.
identifier
0ISSN: 0140-6736
1EISSN: 1474-547X
2DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62442-3
3CODEN: LANCAO
languageeng
publisherLondon: Elsevier Ltd
subjectInternal Medicine
ispartofThe Lancet (British edition), 2013, Vol.382 (S3), p.S17-S17
rights
0Elsevier Ltd
12013 Elsevier Ltd
2Copyright Elsevier Limited Nov 29, 2013
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontrib
0Robinson, Mark, BSc
1Geue, Claudia, PhD
2Lewsey, James, PhD
3Mackay, Daniel, PhD
4McCartney, Gerry, MD
5Curnock, Esther, MPH
6Beeston, Clare, MPH
title
0Investigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland
1The Lancet (British edition)
descriptionAbstract Background The Alcohol etc (Scotland) Act 2010 was implemented in Scotland on Oct 1, 2011, and included a ban on multi-buy discounts of alcohol in Scotland's supermarkets and off licences (ie, off trade). The main aim of the legislation was to remove the price incentive for consumers to purchase more alcohol than they may otherwise have intended and, in turn, to reduce population levels of alcohol consumption. Alcohol sales data provide the best estimate of population alcohol consumption. We have investigated the effect of the introduction of the Alcohol Act on off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland. Methods We obtained data for the volume of pure alcohol sold off trade in Scotland and in England and Wales from market research specialists Nielsen (Oxford, UK) for individual weeks between January, 2009, and September, 2012 ( appendix ). Sales estimates were produced from electronic sales records from most large multiple retailers and a weighted stratified random sample of smaller retailers. We have previously shown that alcohol retail sales data offer a robust source of data for measurement and monitoring of alcohol consumption in Scotland and England and Wales. We used interrupted autoregressive integrated moving average time-series models to test for any change in off-trade alcohol sales (all alcohol and by drink type) after the introduction of the Alcohol Act in Scotland. Models accounted for underlying seasonal and secular trends and were adjusted for changes in other potential confounding factors including disposable income, alcohol prices, and on-trade alcohol sales. Data for these covariates were obtained from the Scottish Government and Office for National Statistics; Nielsen and Office for National Statistics; and CGA Strategy (Stockport, UK), respectively. To provide a concurrent control group, we did the same analyses using data for England and Wales, where the Alcohol Act does not apply. Findings The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with a 2·6% decrease in per-adult off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland (95% CI −5·3 to 0·2). This decline was driven by changes in off-trade wine sales, which decreased by 4·0% after the Act was introduced (95% CI −5·4 to −2·6). The Act was also associated with reduced sales of pre-mixed alcohol beverages (–8·5%, 95% CI −12·7 to −4·1), although these account for a very small proportion of total off-trade sales (1%). The Act was not associated with changes in sales of spirits, beer, or cider or perry in Scotland. There was no evidence to support an association between off-trade alcohol sales and the dummy Alcohol Act variable in England and Wales. Interpretation The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with reduced off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland, largely attributable to a decline in wine sales. Key strengths of our study include the use of objective data for alcohol sales rather than subjective data on self-reported consumption, and the adjustment of our time-series models for underlying trends and potential confounders. Limitations include the exclusion of alcohol sales by certain retailers, the inability to disaggregate population sales estimates by different subgroups, and the short period after implementation of the Act. However, similar changes were not noted in England and Wales, where the Act does not apply, which lends weight to the hypothesis that the changes witnessed in Scotland were as a result of the Act rather than other unmeasured factors or biases. Thus, legislation to ban alcohol discounting seems an important policy in the mix to reduce population alcohol consumption levels. Funding Purchase of the sales data was funded by the Scottish Government as part of the wider Monitoring and Evaluating Scotland's Alcohol Strategy portfolio of studies.
subjectInternal Medicine
issn
00140-6736
11474-547X
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
recordtypearticle
recordideNqFkE1rFTEUhkNR8Fr9CULAjS6mzdckd1wopfQLCi6q4C5kkjNtappck0zx_vtm7hULblyFA8_75JwXoXeUHFFC5fENoYJ0UnH5gfKPkgnBOn6AVlQo0fVC_XiBVn-RV-h1KfeEECFJv0L1Kj5Cqf7WVJ8iThOud4BhmsDWZTL4YQ7Vd-O8xc4Xm-ZY8WgaucBTV7NxgE2w6S4FXEyA8qmFoqlzNgHD7w1k_wAt5CO-sakGE90b9HIyocDbP-8h-n5-9u30srv-enF1enLdWbruZWe5sqLt3E9DzylwphQzazuNzI1M9oI4xgTnxMk1G5iTSgzKglgTMhLr6MAP0fu9d5PTr7mdqe_TnGP7UlMhxdBIJRvV7ymbUykZJr1pK5u81ZTopWC9K1gv7WnK9a5gzVvuyz4H7YRHD1kX6yFacD639rRL_r-Gz_8YbPDRWxN-whbK87K6ME32ksVB-c7A-ROlEJZx
startdate2013
enddate2013
creator
0Robinson, Mark, BSc
1Geue, Claudia, PhD
2Lewsey, James, PhD
3Mackay, Daniel, PhD
4McCartney, Gerry, MD
5Curnock, Esther, MPH
6Beeston, Clare, MPH
general
0Elsevier Ltd
1Elsevier Limited
scope
0AAYXX
1CITATION
20TT
30TZ
40U~
53V.
67QL
77QP
87RV
97TK
107U7
117U9
127X5
137X7
147XB
1588A
1688C
1788E
1888G
1988I
208AF
218AO
228C1
238C2
248FE
258FH
268FI
278FJ
288FK
298G5
30ABUWG
31AN0
32ASE
33AZQEC
34BBNVY
35BEC
36BENPR
37BEZIV
38BHPHI
39C1K
40DWQXO
41FPQ
42FYUFA
43GHDGH
44GNUQQ
45GUQSH
46H94
47HCIFZ
48K6X
49K6~
50K9-
51K9.
52KB0
53KB~
54LK8
55M0R
56M0S
57M0T
58M1P
59M2M
60M2O
61M2P
62M7N
63M7P
64MBDVC
65NAPCQ
66PQEST
67PQQKQ
68PQUKI
69Q9U
70S0X
sort
creationdate2013
titleInvestigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland
authorRobinson, Mark, BSc ; Geue, Claudia, PhD ; Lewsey, James, PhD ; Mackay, Daniel, PhD ; McCartney, Gerry, MD ; Curnock, Esther, MPH ; Beeston, Clare, MPH
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c1856-c37c46735f9531e32772a8cfb2db26540d224330d68292d67497ce4800b0cd193
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2013
topicInternal Medicine
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Robinson, Mark, BSc
1Geue, Claudia, PhD
2Lewsey, James, PhD
3Mackay, Daniel, PhD
4McCartney, Gerry, MD
5Curnock, Esther, MPH
6Beeston, Clare, MPH
collection
0CrossRef
1News PRO
2Pharma and Biotech Premium PRO
3Global News & ABI/Inform Professional
4ProQuest Central (Corporate)
5Bacteriology Abstracts (Microbiology B)
6Calcium & Calcified Tissue Abstracts
7Nursing & Allied Health Database
8Neurosciences Abstracts
9Toxicology Abstracts
10Virology and AIDS Abstracts
11Entrepreneurship Database
12Health & Medical Collection
13ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
14Biology Database (Alumni Edition)
15Healthcare Administration Database (Alumni)
16Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
17Psychology Database (Alumni)
18Science Database (Alumni Edition)
19STEM Database
20ProQuest Pharma Collection
21Public Health Database
22Lancet Titles
23ProQuest SciTech Collection
24ProQuest Natural Science Collection
25Hospital Premium Collection
26Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
27ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
28Research Library (Alumni Edition)
29ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
30British Nursing Database
31British Nursing Index
32ProQuest Central Essentials
33Biological Science Collection
34eLibrary
35ProQuest Central
36Business Premium Collection
37Natural Science Collection
38Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
39ProQuest Central Korea
40British Nursing Index (BNI) (1985 to Present)
41Health Research Premium Collection
42Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
43ProQuest Central Student
44Research Library Prep
45AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
46SciTech Premium Collection
47British Nursing Index
48ProQuest Business Collection
49Consumer Health Database (Alumni Edition)
50ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
51Nursing & Allied Health Database (Alumni Edition)
52ProQuest Newsstand Professional
53ProQuest Biological Science Collection
54Consumer Health Database
55Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
56Healthcare Administration Database
57Medical Database
58Psychology Database
59Research Library
60Science Database
61Algology Mycology and Protozoology Abstracts (Microbiology C)
62Biological Science Database
63Research Library (Corporate)
64Nursing & Allied Health Premium
65ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
66ProQuest One Academic
67ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
68ProQuest Central Basic
69SIRS Editorial
jtitleThe Lancet (British edition)
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Robinson, Mark, BSc
1Geue, Claudia, PhD
2Lewsey, James, PhD
3Mackay, Daniel, PhD
4McCartney, Gerry, MD
5Curnock, Esther, MPH
6Beeston, Clare, MPH
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleInvestigation of the effect of a multi-buy discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland
jtitleThe Lancet (British edition)
date2013
risdate2013
volume382
issueS3
spageS17
epageS17
pagesS17-S17
issn0140-6736
eissn1474-547X
codenLANCAO
abstractAbstract Background The Alcohol etc (Scotland) Act 2010 was implemented in Scotland on Oct 1, 2011, and included a ban on multi-buy discounts of alcohol in Scotland's supermarkets and off licences (ie, off trade). The main aim of the legislation was to remove the price incentive for consumers to purchase more alcohol than they may otherwise have intended and, in turn, to reduce population levels of alcohol consumption. Alcohol sales data provide the best estimate of population alcohol consumption. We have investigated the effect of the introduction of the Alcohol Act on off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland. Methods We obtained data for the volume of pure alcohol sold off trade in Scotland and in England and Wales from market research specialists Nielsen (Oxford, UK) for individual weeks between January, 2009, and September, 2012 ( appendix ). Sales estimates were produced from electronic sales records from most large multiple retailers and a weighted stratified random sample of smaller retailers. We have previously shown that alcohol retail sales data offer a robust source of data for measurement and monitoring of alcohol consumption in Scotland and England and Wales. We used interrupted autoregressive integrated moving average time-series models to test for any change in off-trade alcohol sales (all alcohol and by drink type) after the introduction of the Alcohol Act in Scotland. Models accounted for underlying seasonal and secular trends and were adjusted for changes in other potential confounding factors including disposable income, alcohol prices, and on-trade alcohol sales. Data for these covariates were obtained from the Scottish Government and Office for National Statistics; Nielsen and Office for National Statistics; and CGA Strategy (Stockport, UK), respectively. To provide a concurrent control group, we did the same analyses using data for England and Wales, where the Alcohol Act does not apply. Findings The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with a 2·6% decrease in per-adult off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland (95% CI −5·3 to 0·2). This decline was driven by changes in off-trade wine sales, which decreased by 4·0% after the Act was introduced (95% CI −5·4 to −2·6). The Act was also associated with reduced sales of pre-mixed alcohol beverages (–8·5%, 95% CI −12·7 to −4·1), although these account for a very small proportion of total off-trade sales (1%). The Act was not associated with changes in sales of spirits, beer, or cider or perry in Scotland. There was no evidence to support an association between off-trade alcohol sales and the dummy Alcohol Act variable in England and Wales. Interpretation The introduction of the Alcohol Act was associated with reduced off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland, largely attributable to a decline in wine sales. Key strengths of our study include the use of objective data for alcohol sales rather than subjective data on self-reported consumption, and the adjustment of our time-series models for underlying trends and potential confounders. Limitations include the exclusion of alcohol sales by certain retailers, the inability to disaggregate population sales estimates by different subgroups, and the short period after implementation of the Act. However, similar changes were not noted in England and Wales, where the Act does not apply, which lends weight to the hypothesis that the changes witnessed in Scotland were as a result of the Act rather than other unmeasured factors or biases. Thus, legislation to ban alcohol discounting seems an important policy in the mix to reduce population alcohol consumption levels. Funding Purchase of the sales data was funded by the Scottish Government as part of the wider Monitoring and Evaluating Scotland's Alcohol Strategy portfolio of studies.
copLondon
pubElsevier Ltd
doi10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62442-3