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Persistence of Fortune: Accounting for Population Movements, There Was No Post-Columbian Reversal

Using data on place of origin of today's country populations and the indicators of level of development in 1500 used by Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (2002), we confirm a reversal of fortune for colonized countries as territories, but find persistence of fortune for people and their descendants. P... Full description

Journal Title: American economic journal. Macroeconomics 2014-07-01, Vol.6 (3), p.1-28
Main Author: Chanda, Areendam
Other Authors: Cook, C. Justin , Putterman, Louis
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Pittsburgh: American Economic Association
ID: ISSN: 1945-7707
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recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_1541529877
title: Persistence of Fortune: Accounting for Population Movements, There Was No Post-Columbian Reversal
format: Article
creator:
  • Chanda, Areendam
  • Cook, C. Justin
  • Putterman, Louis
subjects:
  • Agriculture
  • Ancestry
  • Censuses
  • Colonies & territories
  • Colonized Countries
  • Comparative Developement
  • Comparative Development
  • Countries
  • Early Developement
  • Early Development
  • Economic development
  • Economic history
  • Geography
  • Gross domestic product
  • Human capital
  • Long
  • Macroeconomics
  • Population
  • Population density
  • Population estimates
  • Run Economic Growth
  • Studies
  • Urbanization
ispartof: American economic journal. Macroeconomics, 2014-07-01, Vol.6 (3), p.1-28
description: Using data on place of origin of today's country populations and the indicators of level of development in 1500 used by Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (2002), we confirm a reversal of fortune for colonized countries as territories, but find persistence of fortune for people and their descendants. Persistence results are at least as strong for three alternative measures of early development, for which reversal for territories, however, fails to hold. Additional exercises lend support to Glaeser et al.'s (2004) view that human capital is a more fundamental channel of influence of precolonial conditions on modern development than is quality of institutions.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1945-7707
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1945-7707
  • 1945-7715
url: Link


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descriptionUsing data on place of origin of today's country populations and the indicators of level of development in 1500 used by Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (2002), we confirm a reversal of fortune for colonized countries as territories, but find persistence of fortune for people and their descendants. Persistence results are at least as strong for three alternative measures of early development, for which reversal for territories, however, fails to hold. Additional exercises lend support to Glaeser et al.'s (2004) view that human capital is a more fundamental channel of influence of precolonial conditions on modern development than is quality of institutions.
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subjectAgriculture ; Ancestry ; Censuses ; Colonies & territories ; Colonized Countries ; Comparative Developement ; Comparative Development ; Countries ; Early Developement ; Early Development ; Economic development ; Economic history ; Geography ; Gross domestic product ; Human capital ; Long ; Macroeconomics ; Population ; Population density ; Population estimates ; Run Economic Growth ; Studies ; Urbanization
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abstractUsing data on place of origin of today's country populations and the indicators of level of development in 1500 used by Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (2002), we confirm a reversal of fortune for colonized countries as territories, but find persistence of fortune for people and their descendants. Persistence results are at least as strong for three alternative measures of early development, for which reversal for territories, however, fails to hold. Additional exercises lend support to Glaeser et al.'s (2004) view that human capital is a more fundamental channel of influence of precolonial conditions on modern development than is quality of institutions.
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