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Lay health workers and HIV programmes: implications for health systems

One of the consequences of massive investment in antiretroviral access and other AIDS programmes has been the rapid emergence of large numbers of lay workers in the health systems of developing countries. In South Africa, government estimates are 65,000, mostly HIV/TB care-related lay workers contri... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS Care (Print) 2010-07-01, Vol.22 (sup1), p.60-67
Main Author: Schneider, H.
Other Authors: Lehmann, U.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Abingdon: Taylor & Francis Group
ID: ISSN: 0954-0121
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_1554279278
title: Lay health workers and HIV programmes: implications for health systems
format: Article
creator:
  • Schneider, H.
  • Lehmann, U.
subjects:
  • Acquired immune deficiency syndrome
  • AIDS
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Antiretroviral drugs
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Citizen participation
  • Community Health Services - organization & administration
  • Community Health Services - supply & distribution
  • Community Health Workers - organization & administration
  • Community Health Workers - psychology
  • Community Health Workers - supply & distribution
  • Drug therapy
  • Health care delivery
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Health Policy
  • health systems
  • HIV
  • HIV Infections - therapy
  • Home Health Aides - organization & administration
  • Home Health Aides - psychology
  • Home Health Aides - supply & distribution
  • home-based care
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Immunodeficiencies
  • Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
  • Immunopathology
  • Infectious diseases
  • lay health workers
  • Medical personnel
  • Medical sciences
  • Medical treatment
  • Mental health
  • Occupational health and safety
  • Organization of mental health. Health systems
  • Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
  • Psychopathology. Psychiatry
  • Public health
  • Public sector
  • Social participation
  • Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry
  • South Africa
  • Traditions
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
  • Volunteers
ispartof: AIDS Care (Print), 2010-07-01, Vol.22 (sup1), p.60-67
description: One of the consequences of massive investment in antiretroviral access and other AIDS programmes has been the rapid emergence of large numbers of lay workers in the health systems of developing countries. In South Africa, government estimates are 65,000, mostly HIV/TB care-related lay workers contribute their labour in the public health sector, outnumbering the main front-line primary health care providers and professional nurses. The phenomenon has grown organically and incrementally, playing a wide variety of care-giving, support and advocacy roles. Using South Africa as a case, this paper discusses the different forms, traditions and contradictory orientations taken by lay health work and the system-wide effects of a large lay worker presence. As pressures to regularise and formalise the status of lay health workers grow, important questions are raised as to their place in health systems, and more broadly what they represent as a new intermediary layer between state and citizen. It argues for a research agenda that seeks to better characterise types of lay involvement in the health system, particularly in an era of antiretroviral therapy, and which takes a wider perspective on the meanings of this recent re-emergence of an old concept in health systems heavily affected by HIV/AIDS.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0954-0121
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0954-0121
  • 1360-0451
url: Link


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descriptionOne of the consequences of massive investment in antiretroviral access and other AIDS programmes has been the rapid emergence of large numbers of lay workers in the health systems of developing countries. In South Africa, government estimates are 65,000, mostly HIV/TB care-related lay workers contribute their labour in the public health sector, outnumbering the main front-line primary health care providers and professional nurses. The phenomenon has grown organically and incrementally, playing a wide variety of care-giving, support and advocacy roles. Using South Africa as a case, this paper discusses the different forms, traditions and contradictory orientations taken by lay health work and the system-wide effects of a large lay worker presence. As pressures to regularise and formalise the status of lay health workers grow, important questions are raised as to their place in health systems, and more broadly what they represent as a new intermediary layer between state and citizen. It argues for a research agenda that seeks to better characterise types of lay involvement in the health system, particularly in an era of antiretroviral therapy, and which takes a wider perspective on the meanings of this recent re-emergence of an old concept in health systems heavily affected by HIV/AIDS.
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5Attitude of Health Personnel
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14Health care delivery
15Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
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24Human immunodeficiency virus
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27Immunodeficiencies
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29Immunopathology
30Infectious diseases
31lay health workers
32Medical personnel
33Medical sciences
34Medical treatment
35Mental health
36Occupational health and safety
37Organization of mental health. Health systems
38Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
39Psychopathology. Psychiatry
40Public health
41Public sector
42Social participation
43Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry
44South Africa
45Traditions
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abstractOne of the consequences of massive investment in antiretroviral access and other AIDS programmes has been the rapid emergence of large numbers of lay workers in the health systems of developing countries. In South Africa, government estimates are 65,000, mostly HIV/TB care-related lay workers contribute their labour in the public health sector, outnumbering the main front-line primary health care providers and professional nurses. The phenomenon has grown organically and incrementally, playing a wide variety of care-giving, support and advocacy roles. Using South Africa as a case, this paper discusses the different forms, traditions and contradictory orientations taken by lay health work and the system-wide effects of a large lay worker presence. As pressures to regularise and formalise the status of lay health workers grow, important questions are raised as to their place in health systems, and more broadly what they represent as a new intermediary layer between state and citizen. It argues for a research agenda that seeks to better characterise types of lay involvement in the health system, particularly in an era of antiretroviral therapy, and which takes a wider perspective on the meanings of this recent re-emergence of an old concept in health systems heavily affected by HIV/AIDS.
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